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UlUnois Roman's College 

LIBRARY 

GIFT OF ' ' 



r^^^ B0UND 

\ m JACKSONVILLE. IU I 



Patronize 
Our Advertisers 



THEY SUPPORT US 
IN RETURN 
SUPPORT 
THEM 



THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORES 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 
74 S. SIDE SQ. 

Buckthorpe Brothers 

Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 

♦♦♦Colonial *3iut... 

The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Recep- 
tions and Luncheons 

We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any quan- 
tity. We also serve dinners,when reservation is made in 
advance. 

1213 WEST STATE STREET 
Illinois Telephone 93 Bell Telephone 67 

\A/iegandl /Vlarlcet 

224 E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 
ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IN 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

TelepKone 59 229 E. State St. 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

EVERYTHING IN 

DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lane's Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 

It's Well Worth Considering 



Fancy Box Stationery 
Address Books 

313 W. STATE ST. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 



Program Pencils 
Wanl Gold and Silver 
Eversnarp Pencils 

W. B. Rogers 



Use Brazola Coffee 

Sold by 

Jenkinson-Bode Co. 

Coffee Roasters and 
Wholesale Grocers 



Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
EVENING COURIER 

For Today's News 



FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
Catalogues, Pamphlets, Letter- 
Heads, etc., at lowest prices. 



WOMAN'S FURS 

The styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

FRANK BYRNS HA J- 



STORE 



Economy Grocery 



Quality — Cou rtesy — Service 

East State Street 



PURE FOODS 

Illnois Phone 49 



Patronize Our Advertisers 




These shops aren't advertising to see themselves in print- 
they want, and deserve, our patronoge. 



>RADY BROS 

EVERYTHING IN 

Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 

45-47 South Side Square 



MXffiS 

Exclusive Agents 

Hartman Wardrobe Trunks 

Complete Line Hand Baggage 

Mannish 
Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ezard 

The Book and Novelty Snop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETINGS 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILLE 

I still believe in and sell "QUALITY" foot- 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New/ Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 




Spietl) Studio 

Photography In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 

Portraiture 

S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

"Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 South Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co, 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready-to-Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



The 

Artcraft Printing 

Office 



213 WEST MORGAN ST. 

Telephone 400 

EMIL HARWEY 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORKS 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388— Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 

Everything Musical 

49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 

GROCERY 

A good place to get good things 

to eat at a reasonable 

price 

EAST STATE STREET 



AT YOUR SERVICE 

FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 
YOUR FILMS TO US 

The Armstrong 

Drug Stores 

QUALITY STORES 

S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State St. 
Jacksonville, 111. 



Sha n k: & rfs 

AiVoman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
store will give you a better 
idea as to what is new. 


W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 

322-324 East State Street 


SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


J. P. BROWN 
Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 


1F\m Stationery 
and 
<5lft Sbop Novelties 


TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 


19 South Side Square 

Jacksonville 


HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 


H. J. SMITH 

MILLINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 
LADIES' HOSIERY 

South Side Square 


CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



J 

117 ~4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

W cllll TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 

FLOWERS FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 



These shops aren't advertising to see themselves in print — 
they want, and deserve, our patronoge. 




%) Always 



__^ %# _,_ h . FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

SSffX^Ti *™ FOR BRUSHES AND 

UKU13 <^<-J. FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT— 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 
OF FOOTWEAR FOR 
'2&&&P YOUNG PEOPLE 

We Repair tt g~\ X3 13 Tj^ T> 6«J W e snine 
Shoes XX V_J IT Mr JjJ JtC SS Shoes 

On the Corner 

For Those >Vno Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies' Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFNER 

// it's New — We Have It io WEST SIDE SQ. 

EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 



Woman's College girls can always find a complete 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Tomlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 
Quality and Service our Motto 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

EAST STATE STREET 



Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 

Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH! 

Made Glean Sold Glean 

EAT 

MORE 

BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let uf supply tne eats for your next feed 



ftv^ 



© I) e <£ o 1 1 e 9 e (Breetings 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

The Road that Runs Over the Hill i 

'23 at Matanzas 2 

The Moon is in a Mist 5 

A Lace Fan 5 

On Being Sure 9 

Music Notes 10 

Adventures in the Lives of Junior Campers 1 1 

Sophomore-Freshman Hop 14 

Societies 1 5 

Miss Knopf 16 

Scholarship Honors 17 

A Schoolmarm Goes After Her Mail 19 

The Commentator 2 1 

Have a Grin 22 



Z3I?<£ (Tollege Greetings 



THE ROAD THAT RUNS OVER THE HILL. 

Ada M. Clotfeltet, '22 

Receives honorable mention in contest for 1922 College Anthology 

Our hills lie wrapped in a bluish haze, 

Our valley's asleep in the sun, 
For autumn has come with her dreamy days, 

And Indian summer's begun. 
Like stately ships the clouds sail high 

In a wide arched sea of blue: 
Broad fields below, as the clouds drift by, 

Are quiet and peaceful, too. 
But I look far off and I wonder still 
What becomes of the road that runs 
over the hill. 

The silver ribbons of little streams 

Go a winding lazily; 
Faint, pink smoke, pungent with dreams, 

Hangs over them hazily. 
Oh, our valley is gorgeous with autumn trees, 

Scarlet, and green and gold, 
And over it all broods tranquil ease, 

Drowsy with peace untold. 
But I look far off, and I wonder still 

What becomes of the road that leads 
over the hill. 

Over my head a swallow flies 

And a promise of freedom fulfills. 
For it's lost where yonder the unseen liei. 

The land just over the hill. 
Oh, the road is wide, and the road is good, 

And it leads to an unknown world: 
The valley may sleep in the sun if it would 

With banner of mist unfurled. 
But I look far off, and wonder still 
What becomes of the road that runs 
over the hill. 



Obe (TolUgc (BreeUngs 



23 at Matanzas 

Freshmen and Sophs, don't miss these Matanzas accounts. 
They are entertainingly written for those who were not there as 
well as for those who had the fun of going — a pleasure that you 
may share in a year or so. — Editor. 

"Matanzas! Matanzas!" shouted the conductor and then 
hastily retreated before the swarm of girls who were pushing 
down the aisle. The small red box-car with the name "Matan- 
zas" boldly standing out wore a familiar expression to most of 
the Seniors. 

After piling the baggage on a wagon we started down the 
sandy road to Sans Souci, the Senior cottage- The Seniors who 
rode on top of the trunks and suit cases, hanging on to the Jun- 
ior 'ukes\ cases and grocery boxes were entertained by listening 
to the conversation of Mr. Oats, the driver. He confided all his 
troubles to Jo, who took charge of the horses whenever he went 
back to pick up a dropped package. 

Sans Souci cottage was hailed with delight, and prepara- 
tions were at once begun for the steak fry, really a combination 
of steak and ashes, with the effect of the ashes somewhat lessened 
by the use of onions and pickles. 

A few of the more adventuresome spirits bravely started to 
walk to Havana but returned riding in state and talking about 
the wonders of Havana, where they had bought sundaes for only 
ten cents! Billie Betcher and Flossie Weber had "obtained" sev- 
eral melons which were promptly added to the food supply of 
the camp. 

The Juniors gave a peppy dance in their cottage Saturday 
night and invited the Seniors and some of the class of '22 who 
were staying at Idlewild. The grads' entertained with one 
of their thrilling stunts and the selections which their orchestra 
played were truly awe-inspiring. 



^>l)£ (TolUgt (Greetings 



Sunday was a red letter day in Senior camp. In the morn- 
ing the sleepy heads were roused by the news that waffles were 
being prepared by the 'commentors', Ruth and Helen G. And 
such waffles! their flavor was not lessened by the wood chopping 
that had to be done between courses to coax along the greedy 
stove that was always clamoring for fuel. 

Dressing chickens is no great task when necessary equipment 
is at hand, but it is the work of an artist to dress them with 
luke warm water and to carve them with knives that were nev- 
er intended for such purposes. Margaret daintly and apologetical- 
ly picked one fowl while D. M. slashed bravely at hers with 
set lips. Almost the whole camp had a turn at the chickens so 
the flavor was all the better at dinner time. 

It was loads of fun to wade along the shallow beach and 
pick up shells and turtles. Anthony and Cleopatra, along with 
Romeo and Juliet were snatched from their sandy homes and 
in spite of frantic exertions were secured and brought back as 
"souvenirs". 

A high rope swing hanging out over a steep sloping sand 
bank offered great attraction to some. Billie and Eloise became 
very expert in the art, but Billie started thinking of "combust- 
ions" while she was on the swing, and so found herself landed 
on her neck in the sand pile. 

A snipe hunt planned by Miss Boyd and Miss Whitmer for 
the express purpose of ensnaring some of the Seniors, especially 
Janette, created great excitement for a time but the snipes were 
rather scarce and hard to find. The hunt created so much excite- 
ment it was hard for the Seniors to fall in so it was way in the 
"wee sma' hours" before there was quiet in the cottage. The 
cooks hunted refreshments and coffee was served just before re- 
tiring — about 4:30 a. m. Even retiring at that hour there was 
little sleep for Ruth and Billie who had bunks too narrow and 
too short for comfort. 

Monday afternoon came all too soon and it was a bit hard 
to go back to civilization but there were so many pleasant me- 
mories to take back all had the feeling that 



Z3l)£ (Tolles* Greetings 



"Matanzas is the place to go, 
To form your friendships rare- 
Laughter, chimes and happy times 
And girls without a care. 
Glad, we were glad, 
But sad we turned away, 
But we won't forget to go 
Back Matanzas way-ay-ay 
Back Matanzas way." Eloise Calhoun 

n n n n 

And the 1922 Seniors did'nt forget to come. There they 
were in the cottage next door, Marian DePew, Margaret Merker, 
Gladys Laughlin, Lura Hurt, Harriet Keys, Hildreth Ashwood, 
Velma Bain and Margie Hamilton, a sort of "family" reunion. 

It is with sorrow that we must close our happy tale with a 
notice of the untimely death of Anthony and Cleopatra, who 
perished in a fruit jar pining for the waters of Matanzas. 
Romeo and Juliet are still alive, tho ailing. Horatius, who had 
the strongest constitution, made a bold escape. Rumor says that 
he was captured and taken to the fourth ward school, but if on 
crawling into bed some night you should find a very small turtle 
beneath your pillow, you will know that it is Horatius, weary 
of wandering, come home to die. 

n n n n 

NIGHT AT MATANZAS 

By Alma Blodget. 
Moon high up above the trees 
Shines upon the lake; 
Beams that fall on ripples, 
And leave prisms in their wake. 
Bonfire on the shore, 
Coals glowing on the sand, 
Rising to a blood-red flame 
By the lake breeze fanned. 
Voices far out-singing — 
In boats beyond the light, 
Bear in them the splendor 
Of the lake and the night. 
4 






X5\)t (Tollegc (Greetings 



THE MOON IS IN A MIST 
Audrey King 
Receives honorable mention in contest for 1922 college 
anthology 

The moon is in a mist. 

She is a harem-lady behind a veil; 

A transparent veil, a veil of misty grey. 

It reveals; it conceals, 

It is very beautiful. 

The moon is behind a mist. 
She is like a lady with shining eyes, 
She is like a flower grey with dew. 
She is like a pleasant mystery. 

The poem by Margaret Fowler, "At a College Window", 
was accepted for the anthology, not yet issued. 

Eloise Calhoun 

n n n n 

A LACE FAN. 
Josephine Rink, '23. 

Carson Chalmers looked thoughtfully at the black lace fan 
in his hands. It was large and beautifully covered, and he 
could almost see the two black eyes that had looked at him so 
roguishly from behind its folds. 

That had been a wild night at Bob's studio party in Paris 
six years before. How could he, a Chalmers and a serious-minded 
law graduate just out of college — how could he have enjoyed 
such a revel? As he thought it over, he decided that he hadn't 
enjoyed it — there had been just one person who had made the 
evening bearable, and he had never seen her before nor since. 
Strange that Bob hadn't been able to enlighten him as to who 
she was, or whence she came, but it seemed that she had been 
bold enough to come without invitation, and her charm made 
them overlook the intrusion. Yet there seemed to be a strange 
contradiction in her make-up. Her black velvet gown, long and 
clinging, was daringly cut, and her face, which must have been 
beautiful, was hidden by a mask of black satin and lace. Her 

5 



Obc (TolUgc (Greetings 



voice was low and cultivated, and she spoke French, Spanish and 
English with equal ease. Since there was no trace of foreign ac- , 
cent in her English, Chalmers had decided that she must be an 
American. At times she had seemed very quiet and sensible. 

"I don't really believe you belong in this kind of life, Mr. 
Chalmers." 

"No, I don't. I suppose I'm too quiet to suit these people. 
Fact is, I've never been able to see just what made Bob so fond 
of me when we're so different. But how did you learn my 
name?" 

Ignoring his question, she continued, "And I can just see 
the girl you'll marry. She will be a sweet little blonde, just 
home from a very quiet, secluded girl's school, and so unsophisti- 
cated that she'll actually be refreshing after your day in the 
court room. Mind, you must never mention this naughty party 
to her. She'd die of mortification to think you'd spend such 
an evening." 

"You've drawn a very ideal picture, and I'll probably 
marry just such a girl — if she'll have me. Frankly, I don't ap- 
prove of the type of woman I see here tonight." 

"Certainly not. Your type likes to be set up on a pedestal 
and worshiped. I used to have the same idea, and I may again 
some day — but not while that tantalizing music lasts. Come, 
let's dance!" 

But as Chalmers didn't dance, the girl tossed her black 
fan into his lap and was carried away to the dance floor on 
the arm of one of a number of men who were watching for just 
such a chance. The music was queer and oriental and the melo- 
dy made a definite impression on Chalmer's mind as he watched 
the girl fling herself into the rhythmic movements. After a few 
minutes he became disgusted himself for watching such flippancy, 
and he quietly ordered his wraps and slipped away, quite for- 
getting the fan in his pocket. 

And he still had the fan. Several times he had thought of 
destroying it, but he could never quite bring himself to do it, 



Ol)c College (Greetings 



so be kept it hidden safely where Peggy would not find it. Sweet 
little Peggy! What would happen if she were to learn of that 
party? Chalmer's face actually reddened when he thought of 
it. It had been the one mis-step of his life, and he squirmed un- 
easily when he remembered that he had once done a thing he 
could not tell his wife. 

The girl had been almost correct in her delineation of his 
future wife. To be sure, she had black hair instead of light, and 
she was a little older than the sweet girl graduate, but she was 
quiet and sensible. His mind went back to the day he met her — 
three years ago at his sister's commencement. Happy little sister 
with her Bachelor's degree and a major in foreign languages! 
She had graduated with high honors, but there was a greater 
cause for her hilarity. She and her language instructor had been 
very good friends, and the older woman was taking her to 
Europe for the summer, partly for pleasure and partly for study 
of languages and customs. Chalmers had thought it very love- 
ly for sister, but he would have been much better satisfied if Miss 
Peggy Hamlin were not to be so far away, for he had taken a 
great liking to her. It seemed that the feeling was mutual, for 
after it had grown for a time, it burst into bloom as an orange 
blossom. 

That had been a year and a half ago, and here he sat, re- 
calling it all while staring at the lace fan. Only twice had he al- 
lowed himself to take the fan out and muse over it. There was 
something in the remembrance of its owner that was peculiarly 
satisfying. In fact, Peggy's eyes had often reminded him of the 
ones behind the fan, but it was always with an inward kick at 
himself that he dismissed the comparison from his mind. To- 
night the likeness was especially strong and persistant. Try as 
he would, he could not dismiss it. Could it be possible that he 
was growing tired of Peggy and her quietness? No! — he would 
not trade her for a world of flirts in black gowns. Why, oh why! 

Suddenly his line of thought was broken by a sound. He 
listened intently. Someone was singing, but so faint was 
the voice that he could scarcely hear it. Presently, as he caught 



X5i)<L (LolUgfc (Sr^etings 



bits of the melody, a strange feeling crept over him. As he pieced 
the bits together, he realized that sometime, somewhere, he had 
heard the song. His brain strove in vain to remember the circum- 
stances. Suddenly there flashed before his mind the last scene at 
Bob's studio party, and in the midst of the revel was the girl in 

the black gown. For a moment he sat stunned. Could it? 

No! it couldn't be! Quite possibly one of the servants knew the 
song and was singing it. But the doubt was torment. He rose 
slowly, dropped the fan into his chair, then hurried into the 
hall. The music had ceased, and he stood bewildered for a mo- 
ment. He feared to seek Peggy, for he could not explain to her 
his desire to find the singer, but something drove him to her 
room. As he raised his hand to give the customary three raps 
before entering, he heard a sob and without knocking, Chalmers 
threw the door open. Peggy was sitting on the edge of the bed 
and spread before her was a black velvet dress, a black mask and 
a pair of long black kid gloves. 

n n n n 

Oh Lord! 

They've done it again! 

My parents have closed their eyes 

And walked between the aisles 

Of some department store, and grabbed: 

A waist, a skirt, another waist 

And sent them on to me, 

As one thrusts rags on a wooden cross 

To make a scarecrow. 

What shall I do? 

I can't offend them. 

But neither can I wear these things 

That they call clothes. 

— Dorothy Dieman. 

n n n n 

To Eloise Calhoun, President of the Senior Class. 
You asked for March 21 for the Senior-Junior party. Are 
you sure that you want it during the Easter recess? This might 
be convenient in many ways, but would be a trifle unusual. 

The Date Committee. 
8 



Oi)t (TolUge (Breetings 



Vol. XXVI- Jacksonville, III, Oct. 1922 No. 1 

STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 

Associate Editor Eloise Calhoun 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 



ON BEING SURE 

"The reason most people never learn anything", said Uncle 
Abraham, puffing his ancient pipe, "is that they are always too 
dawgonne sure." (Note: we do not really possess an Uncle Ab- 
raham, and if we did he probably wouldn't talk like that; but 
we don't dare use questionable words ourselves, because we are 
such a new editor, and have such a time with our style, such as 
remembering to use the editorial plural in speaking of ourselves, 
that it is safest to attribute anything a bit shady in the way of 
rhetoric to something harmless like an uncle, until we get our 
reputation established and can say anything we want to, like 
Bernard Shaw. As we were saying when interrupted — )Our 
Uncle Abraham (fictious) intended to say that whole trouble 
with the world is that too many people have opinions. 

Ah! Uncle Abraham (mythological) will now be discard- 
ed; the peril of the editorial plural is past; I — I mean we — 
now write without interruption. 

Opinions are to many their most sacred possessions. They 
preserve them as they do their complexions. Complexions are 
freshened and often changed, however; their opinions — never! 
Somebody taught them something once, and they will believe 
it to the end of time, tho' evidence is piled on evidence to get 
them to change their minds. 



obe <£olkge (bntlitiQs 



Never be sure: 

That the girl across the hall is attractive. 
That the girl next door is not. 
That you don't like spinach. 
That spiritualism is an absurdity. 
That your heart is broken. 
Remember that at one time men were sure that the earth 
was flat. Never be so sure that you won't listen to argument. 

This is not the same as saying, "Never be sure of anything. 
The woman who veers in her beliefs like an autumn leaf is as 
much to be avoided as the one of the cast-iron opinions. The 
great reformers of the world have been "dead sure" of the 
things they championed. But they would have avoided many 
mistakes if they had been more open to advice. 

It's another case for the happy medium, — opinions, plus the 
willingness to change them. To parody again the long-suffering 
song that the Seniors brought back from Matanzas, — 

"What we need is convince-ability. 
Just got to have more convince-ability." 

— M. F. and Uncle Abraham. 
n n n n 

Candle-lighting and Founders' Day, the important event of 
the month, deserves more space than can be given it in this issue. 
See the November Greetings. 

n n n n 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC NOTES. 

An interesting series of faculty and artists recitals has been 

prepared to be given before Christmas on the following dates: 

Oct. 1 6 — Faculty recital, Mme. Colard. 

Oct. 23 — Artist Series, Alma Hays Reed, Soprano and Mar- 
garet O'Conor, harpist. 

Oct. 30 — Organ recital, Director Pearson. 

A series of short Thursday morning recitals is also being 

given by the College of Music faculty ar the High School and 

Junior High School starting on Oct. 1 2. 

Several state and county prize winners are enrolled in the 

college of music for advanced courses this year, among whom 

are Virginia Clark, Goldie Suydan, Madeline King, Louise Vas- 

concellos and Rhoba Phillips. 

10 



Ol)£ College Greetings 



ADVENTURES IN THE LIVES OF JUNIOR 
CAMPERS. 

The coolness of the moist air, the singing of the maple 
leaves as they came pattering down on the immense stretches of 
poison ivy, sand, and other things, the call of the lake and of 
forest paths, all went toward making our stay at Matanzas a real 
one. There's nothing like the feeling you get as you walk 
down the narrow winding road between the two mountains of 
maple and hickory trees. The back door of a cottage now and 
then comes in range of vision; towels, wash cloths, wash basins, 
pans and tables are the usual decorations. Sometimes a group of 
girls in knickers or bathing suits is preparing for a formal camp 
lunch. 

The first thing we Juniors did was to hunt up some boats 
and that's the way we came to know "Uncle Bill". When we 
reached his shanty we were almost covered with burrs and our 
shoes were full of sand. We looked our part as well as he did — 
the best part of Matanzas. He very willingly rented us some 
boats and then and there began the process of blister formation 
on our hands as we rowed back. The process continued in de- 
velopment until the foundation was well laid for the horney, 
rough and calloused pieces of anatomy that now hold this pen 
and paper. 

The water looked so inviting, green scum, little air bub- 
bles and all, that we could not resist a plunge before lunch which 
we fortunately did not have to prepare. We moored our boat, 
ran up the beach and stealthily crept up the back stairway and 
into our bathing suits. Just as carefully we came down and were 
just pushing off shore when Billie Betcher advanced from un- 
seen quarters and hailed us. 

"Small children", quoth she, "What are you doing?" 

"We're going swimming." muttered Dixie, the good champ- 
ion of the water. 

"Miss Boyd said to tell you not to go in," malicely trumph- 
ed.. "Because," as our faces fell, "the water's bad enough 
anyway." 

11 



Ol)<* (TolUge (Greetings 



When we came back, our good chaperone Miss Whitmer 
was satisfying her animal loving soul by petting a little box 7 
turtle, some crayfish and toads and frogs.. If I had never entered 
into the atmosphere of "The Ancient Mariner" before, I did then 
as I thought of all those slick, slimy crawling things which 
would in all probability seek my pillow for rest that night. 

Saturday night we Juniors invited the Seniors and our last 
year's seniors up to our cottage. Instead of the usual source of 
entertainment we reversed it. The old seniors put on a musical 
program; there is not space here to tell you about that and any- 
way you can read it in the society columns of any newspaper. 
It will be sufficient here to tell you that Gladys Laughlin acted 
as musical director and Margaret Merker as the "bananas". The 
Juniors served watermelon in the dance hall and on the porch 
overlooking the lake. That's the reason why Janette had to sweep 
the cottage the next morning. 

Did you ever know a super-thrill? Well, four of us Jun- 
iors had one that first night in camp. Although the joke's on us, 
it's too good to keep and I'll have to tell you about it. Down by 
the "Whoopee" cottage is an immense tree. Its great limbs 
stretch out over the lake. Beneath it is a low, level stretch of sand 
slopes slowly into the water. Almost at right angles to this 
sandy slope rises a steep bank which supports on its topmost 
point a sort of diving board. Now the super-thrill comes in when 
one climbs this bank, walks out to the end of the board, takes 
tight hold of the long rope that dangles from the strong limb, 
takes a firm seat on the bag of sand that is suspended from this 
rope, and pushes off- Especially if you do it at night as we did 
it's bound to make cold chills run up and down your back. 

Our yells and whoops unfortunately attracted the attention 
of some of our neighbors and before we knew where it came 
a great form loomed up. Gathering the remnants of our scatter- 
ed courage together we waited breathlessly until further develop- 
ments. By the time it came near enough for us to see that 
it was a man Janette and I were out of sight. But Hal and Dixie 
did not realize until it was too late the truth of Miss Weirsema's 

12 



Ol)e College (BreeUncjs 



maxim that running is a good protection. Strenuous physical 
training and swinging the wicked glove had made Dixie's arm 
strong and swift. So when her fist rushed forward our visitor's 
head turned upward and his eyes searched the heavens for the 
bright stars. 

While their victim was recovering Hal and Dixie made good 
time back toward the cottage. They announced their coming by 
wild yells of "a man". "He's coming, Oh help! Help!" I was 
sitting on the front steps and almost went through the screen 
door trying to get in. Bonnie was asleep on the bed and she gave 
a terrific leap toward the ceiling — I'll wager she never jumped 
so high before and probably never will again. When we all got 
in and had reacher the stage when we were all talking at once 
some rattlings and fumblings at the door attracted our attention. 
Petrified and in absolute silence we huddled closer together. 
Here was the man again. A strong determination was written on 
every feature and great glasses covered his eyes. A cap pulled far 
down over his forehead, a blue shirt and a pair of yellow trous- 
ers completed his costume. His fumbling fingers at last found 
the door knob and it began to open. A piercing scream, a rush, 
quavering voices and we all blindly followed Elaine on her mad 
rush to the back door. A firm footstep — the swish of riding 
breeches — and our good chaperone and protectoress advanced 
forward. 

"Sir", she said. Everything was still. "What do you want?" 

"I — I want to take the young ladies for a ride." The low 
voice had a peculiarly soft southern accent. 

"But we do not know you." 

"I'm a perfectly respectable man." What could that twitch 
of the mouth mean but a dry sense of humor? 

"Why do you not come in the daytime to give us your in- 
vitation?" That was a stickler and he was silent for a time. 

"I work all day" — and the excellent control gave way and 
we listened amazed to the peals and peals of laughter; not the 
laughter of a man but of a woman. Off came the cap — long wavy 
hair; off came the glasses — a woman's eyes- 

13 



Obc (Tollcge (Brewings 



So here's to Miss Whitmer — we'll have to hand it to her. If 
you want an exciting story ask her about the moonshiners. She 
only told us that she saw some but she might tell you more. 

Back there the moist air is still blowing and the leaves are 
still pattering down on the poison ivy and sand burrs. Next 
year we'll walk down the narrow winding road but not as Jun- 
iors. We'll go in the back door of "Elsinore" and have our good 
time all over again. — D. Dean. 

n n n n 

And Have You Heard 
Earlier in the fall Matanzas was chosen for a most inter- 
esting announcement party. Florence Madden, '20, Edna 
Osborne, '20, Mildred Funk, '20, Lucile Kirby, '23 and Mir- 
iam Sipfle, '20 were there for the announcement of the latter's 
engagement to Walter Heckman of New York State. "Sip" 
dear, our love and best wishes. 

n n n n 
SOPHOMORE-FRESHMAN HOP. 
On September 31st, the Sophs very kindlv initiated the 
Freshmen into the mysteries of a manless hop in the gymnasium. 
Each little girl was escorted by a Sophomore They had secured 
the services of the Clark-King orchestra, whoso tantalizing tunes 
coaxed the most dignified into dancing. At first, the Freshmen 
timorously proclaimed that they couldn't lead, but the un- 
daunted hostesses (many of whom had never led before) gaily 
whisked their guests about with professional ease. The Soph- 
mores proved that men, tho' a pleasant accessory, are not neces- 
sary to merriment and a happy evening. 

n n n n 

Wife (at breakfast) — Could I have a little more money for 
shopping today?" 

Husband — "Certainly. Would you rather have an old five 
or a new one?" 

Wife — "A new one, of course." 

Husband — "Here's the one — and I'm four dollars to the 
good." — Ex. 

14 



Ol)e College (Greetings 







^ Y~- 



NEW SOCIETY MEMBERS. 

The upperclass societies welcome the following: 
Lambda Alpha Mu — Audrey Layman, Donnabel Keys, 
Grace Walker, Zenith Homberger, Harriet McOmber, Mary Nelle 
Harper, Mildred Brown, Carol Roark, Barbara Smith, Ruth 
Gillfillan, Ruth Muirhead, Winifred Potter, Frances Brooks, 
Eleanor Dowd, Catherine Stevenson, Ruth Esparaza, Lucile 
Morris, Thelma Pires. 

Helen Gowdy, President; Sarita Jones, Secretary. 

Theta Sigma — Myra Chiles, Christine Cotner, Maud 
Craigmiles, Florence Adams, Dorothy Elrod, Maurine Gilpin, 
Beatrice Hasenstab, Ethyl Keller, Margaret Kessler, Hazel Moore, 
Lois Oliver, Mary Thompson, Wilhelmine Wagner. 

Helena Betcher, President; Helen Bly, Secretary. 

Belles Lettres — Hattie Baughman, Virginia Gentry, Beulah 

15 



Ol)e College (Breetlngs 



Farnham, Belle Irelan, Ethel Moris, Charlotte Rodgers, Grayce 
Rexroat. 

Velda Meadows, President; Ruth Webb, Secretary.' 
Phi Nu — Fredericka Balch, Zola DeHaven, Agnes Davis, 
Dorothy Dieman, Gertrude Foster, Irene Fruit, Velma Kitchell, 
Martha Logan, Marie Luke, Helen Moffit, Gwendolynne 
Schroyer, Maxine Sperry, and Mae Virgin. 

Helen Massie, President; Eloise Calhoun, Secretary. 

n n n n 
MISS KNOPF. 

Miss Nellie A. Knopf spent six weeks this summer paint- 
ing in Manitou, Colorado and its vicinity. While there she had 
the privilege of having criticisms on her work from Birger Sand- 
jen- Those who had the good fortune to see the water color ex- 
hibition at Strawn Memorial last year will remember the joy- 
ousness and wonderful technique of Mr. Sandjen's paintings. 

Miss Knopf had her ''On a Gloucester Hillside" on exhibi- 
tion at the Pageant of Progress in Chicago this summer. Two 
other paintings "September Morning on the Beach" and "Cam- 
eron's Cove, Co!orado"were included in the art exhibition at the 
Central States Fair held in Aurora in August. This exhibition 
was an unusual collection of the contemporary works of our best 
American painters. Miss Knopf was also represented by "The 
Mountains, Colorado", in an exhibition of one hundred selected 
paintings by American Artists at the Rochester N. Y. Memorial 
Art Gallery. A water color "Clouds and Sunshine on the 
Peaks" is touring the Art Museums in a collection from the 
Second International Water Color Exhibition and another water 
color, "Spring Flower Motif" is included in a touring exhibi- 
tion sent out by the American Federation of Arts. 

n n n n 
HELEN DE WITT 
Dr. Harker received a letter not long ago from Helen De- 
Witt of Denver. Helen is the girl of whom he spoke in chapel 
several weeks ago, a former president of the Student's Association 
and of Lambda Alpha Mu, who left college in her senior year, 
and who has been waiting for health ever since. In her letter she 
tells of relief from the severe pain and of being up and about a 
little. "What more," she says, "can I ask?" 

16 



<o\)2 (TolU^e (Brewings 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS, 1921-1922. 
High Honors. 

list have an average of 90 or 
rank in the order given- 

1924 

1. Dyarman, Carrie 

2. Terhune, Grace 

3. Jordan, Audrey 

4. Munson, Harriett 

5. Barwise, Alice 

6. Roark, Mary Elizabeth 

7. Lowry, Bernadine 
1925 

1. Cotner, Christine Cotner 

2. Pires, Thelma 

3. Davis, Agnes 

4. Farnham, Beulah 

5. Kitchell, Velma 

6. Logan, Martha 

7. Morgan, Opal 

8. Hieronymus, Verna 
Bell, Twilla 



Those in the High Honor 


above for the year's work, and 




1922 


1. 


Ashwood, Hildreth 


2. 


Dell, Hazel 


3. 


Chiles, Helen 


4. 


Cover, Estelle 


5. 


Remley, Dorothy 


6. 


Clotfelter, Ada 


7. 


Munson, Marian 




1923 


1. 


Hodgens, Eva Gertrude 


2. 


Pires, Elson 


3. 


Fowler, Margaret 


4. 


Wackerle, Mrs. Alice 


5. 


Wallace, Janette 


6. 


Calhoun, Eloise 



90. 



9 



10. Luke, Marie 



Honor List 
Those in the Honor List have an average between 88 and 



1922 

1. Bain, Velma 

2. Hurt, Lura 

3. McOmber, Miriam 

4. Merker, Margaret 

5. Paschall, Helen 

6. Poole, Helen 

7. Dugger, Carman 

8. Ellison, Mary 

1923 

1. Blodget, Alma 

2. Rinehart, Suzanne 

3. Styles, Grace 

4. Weber, Florence 



1924 

1. Bailey, Helen 

2. Clark, Mary Lois 

3. King, Audrey 

4. Kriege, LeNore 

5. McCalmen, Helen 

6. Mershon, Verna 

7. Anderson, Luro 

8. Gibbons, Lesta 

9. Kennish, Ruth 

10. Marko, Lucy 

11. Randle, Kathryn 

12. Vick, Lucille 

13. Webb, Ruth 

14. Zwermann, Eva 



17 



Z5l)t College (Greetings 



Honorable Mention 



Those receiving honorable mention have an average between 



85 and 88. 








1922 


11. 


Homrighous, Mildred 


1. 


Adams, Mary Rose 


12. 


Meridith, Janette 


2. 


Keys, Harriett 


13. 


Waldron, Mildred 


3. 


Laughlin, Gladys 


14. 


Byland, Helen 


4. 


Muse, Jane 


15. 


Craig, Josephine 


5. 


Lacy, Jennie 


16. 


Garvey, Marjorie 


6. 


Mayer, Mildred 


17. 


Jones, Sarita 




1923 


18. 


Paulding, Frances 


1. 


Betcher, Helena 


19. 


Sturgeon, Marguerite 


2. 


Dinsmore, Eleanore 


20. 


Watters, Marguerite 


3. 


Holder, Faye 


21. 


Weaver, Glenadine 


4. 


Massie, Helen 




1925 


5. 


Smith, Dorothy May 


1. 


Gilfillan, Ruth 


6. 


Hall Harriett 


2. 


Hatch, Lois 


7. 


Rink, Josephine 



0. 


Keller, Ethel 


8. 


Unversaw, Gertrude 


4. 


Shank, Leota 


9. 


Foster, Ada 


5. 


World, Marion 




1924 


6. 


Baughman, Hattie 


1. 


Burmeister, Margaret 


7. 


Blankenship, Genevie 


2. 


Filson, Mrs. Helen 


8. 


Clinton, Marjorie 


3. 


Whitlock, Myra 


9. 


Fruit, Irene , 


4. 


Yanseck, Katherine 


10. 


Hunter, Marie 


5. 


Ballow, Mary 


11. 


Keys, Donnabel 


6. 


Brougher, Helen 


12. 


Muirhead, Ruth 


7. 


Dean, Dorothy 


13. 


Myers, Elizabeth 


8. 


Dryden, Margaret 


14. 


Virgin, Mae 


9. 


Fullerton, Fay 


15. 


DeHaven, Zola 


10. 


Harrison, Julia 


16. 


Dowd, Eleanora 






17. 


Harper, Mary Nell 






18. 


Layman, Audrey 






19. 


Main, Dorothy 






20. 


Rexroat, Gracye 






21. 


Schroyer, Gwendolynn 






22. 


Thompson, Mary 




n n n 


EI 



Professor of History — "What do you know of the age of 
Elizabeth?" 

Jones (dreamily) — "She'll be nineteen next week." 

—Ex. 

18 



Z3l)e College (Greetings 



A SCHOOLMARM GOES AFTER HER MAIL. 

I had barely brought the car to a stop at the Post Office 
when a perfect herd of the young of the genus homo surround- 
ed me: — Whites, Mexicans and individuals bordering on either, 
entirely disguised by a coating of dirt swarmed over every avail- 
able portion of the car. 

"Where you goin' Miss Martin? — See my new knife, I saw 
it drop out of a man's pocket and I found it. — Lookit May's 
bobbed hair — I picked up 38% bushels of potatoes Saturday. 
Where'd your mama go today? — We got a new calf and we 
named it Rosebud. See my sore toe!" 

Questions and information were hurled at me simultaneous- 
ly and with perfect team work. Tactfully endeavoring to look 
as if I were answering each individual I asked, "Will some one 
please get my mail for me?" 

"I will, I will!" and Edna streaked in after it. 

Dortha and her father approached. Dortha joined the 
throng and her father, unmistakably fat, and ambled on with a 
characteristic "Howdy" — while Dortha with a pleased smile and 
sure of praise announced, "I used one of them big words today 
you told us to remember." 

"Oh good! What one?" I asked with professional interest. 

"I told papa he was colossal." 

"Here's your mail, two letters for you, wonder who they're 
from?" and Edna proffered the mail. One letter was official look- 
ing and I hastily read it while Jimmy experimented with the 
lights and ignition. 

"Dear Miss Martin", it read, "The monthly reports for 
January and March for Dist. 67 are missing. Will you kindly 
make out same and send at once. We also beg to be allowed to 
call attention to a discrepancy in your term report. Your total 
enrollment is 24. Your average daily attendance, as given is 
25.78. Will you kindly correct this and exercise a little more 
care in your approximation. 

Very truly, 

H. S. Jackson, Superintendent. 

19 



Or><£ College <Breeting5 



Dortha, clutching at my wavering attention, exclaimed, "O 
isn't our school garden doing fine? And O Miss Martin, some 
one's been picking the flowers and I know who. I'll tell you af- 
ter while," and she cast a bashful and meaning look at Ruth. 

Luckily she was interrupted by May: "O Miss Martin, 
we're going to have a picnic Sunday, can you come?" 
"Why I'll be delighted, May. Where is it to be?" 
"O, down at your place. Can you bring a fried chicken?" 
Eva chimes in; "It'd be nice if we could have some ice 
cream but we ain't got enough money." 

I feebly agreed to entertain the herd at my home, furnish- 
ing fried chicken and ice-cream. 

"I must go now, the folks will want their mail." 
The mob fell off the car and stood at a respectful distance. 
Jimmy was amusing himself with rotating the speedometer 
which had been carefully set with a view to measuring the gas 
used. 

"Well, Jimmy, aren't you going to get out?" 
"Oh no", complacently, "mama said I could go home with 
you and stay all day." — Margaret Wilson, ex — '23. 

n n n n 

OWED TO A STOMACH-ACHE. 

Billy Betchet 
I never wrote a poem before. 
I never will no doubt no more. 
But this one simply must be writ, 
So muse, please on my shoulder sit. 

I will not, will not write of spring, 
How with it it doth flowers bring, 
Nor of the gentle rain that falls, 
Nor of the robin's gladsome calls. 

What shall I write of? No one knoweth, 
So here goeth — 

Nothing! 
I guess I haven't a poet's soul. 
I sure do poorly play the role. 

20 



^?I)£ (TolUge (Breetings 



THE COMMENTATOR 

It has long been our own ambition to be able to see such 
little observations as occur to us as significant given a place of 
such importance as to assure them at least respectful attention. 
The opportunity has at last arrived and we are preparing to 
see ourselves in cold, hard print. We offer a little column of 
comments. 

n n n n 

No college can truly call itself an institution of higher learn- 
ing when its upperclassmen say with serenity, "I'm a gonna' do 
this or that;" its sophomores belabor our ears with "git" and 
"had of". Such a college deserves the name of college simply be- 
cause it cannot be called a "grammar" school. 

Unnecessary slowness is the chief ear-mark of stupidity. 
Were it not for the inconvenience it causes, we would be content 
to see it not, but since afflicted people are constantly ruining 
the comfort of others we rise to protest. The fact that haste 
makes waste does not exclude all expedition in the accomplish- 
ment of work. Whether we are transacting business at the office, 
either behind or in front of the desk, or whether we have some 
special task or lesons to do, let us do it with dispatch, if we 
wish to escape being called "dumb" in the popular sense of the 
word. 

Constant interference has the same effect as a nagging wife. 
It exasperates and leads to an attitude of sullenness. Hence our 
statement that people in authority should recognize the differ- 
ence between efficiency and undue meddling. Nothing produces 
more discord than "noisiness" even though a technical right 
for it exists. Parents have the legal right to open and read their 
children's letters but morally they are committing an act of great 
rudeness. 

People in authority should be willing to forgo a few of the 
privileges of their offices in order to produce harmony. Free 

21 






U 



Z5l)e College (Greetings 



thought and even free speech in subjects do not necessarily mean 
a weakness in rulers. 

This is an open column for the voicing of honest opinions. 
Don't keep your disapprovals to talk over with friends — print 
them for the good of the community. — Editor. 

n n n n 
HAVE A GRIN. 
Mary — "I'll marry you on one condition." 
Jerry — "That's all right; I entered college on four." — Ex. 
Freshman — When is Thanksgiving this year? I do hope it 
comes on Saturday so that we can go home over the week end! 

Excited Soph — "A girl is entertaining a man in the recep- 
tion room and all she has on is the floor lamp." 

The ringer of the cow bell or one of his fellow trusties had 
cause to think that "the debil was after him sho' nuff" when a 
pan of water descended upon him from a window, and, stopping 
beneath the next one to shake it off, he was "plunked" on the 
head by an orange. He will never believe that both were ac- 
cidental. 

Eva Gertrude, polite, tho' sleepy, at the breakfast table, — 
"Miss Napkin, here's your austin." 

"Did you know Frances Brooks was appointed a protem? 
Do you suppose that's the same as a proctor? See, here's the bul- 
letin board." 

It read — "the following are House Chairman pro tern." 

"She wore a most peculiar expression. When questioned, 
she explained, "I'm homesick, but I can't cry. Every time I get 
all fixed to weep somebody cheers me up." 

"When your bobbed hair sticks out that way", said Eva 
Gert's disdainful brother, "it looks like the south end of a north- 
bound hen." 

Jo — Do you mean to say that money we owe for Matan- 
zas includes all those chickens? How did we get them? 
Ruth — Cheep! Cheep! 

22 



THE 
AYERS NATIONAL BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. F. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 




DIRECTORS 

ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-President H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

H. C. CLEMENT, Asst. Cashier W. G. GOEBEL, Asst. Cashier 



Member of Federal Reserve Bank 



The Store for 

DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

HOSIERY, GLOVES, CORSETS 

NOTIONS 



R 






The Dunlap 

(EUROPEAN) 

A HOTEL THAT APPEALS TO WOMEN 

John M. Rule, Manager 



CAFE CONFECTIONERY 

peacock Jnn 

For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Our Fountain 

CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELERS 

I JACKSONVILLE Ry. & LIGHT CO. 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
T. A. Chapin, Vice-President £ g; FarTeil 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j) s. Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

GILBERTS DRUGSTORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN— 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 

Mollenbrok fe? McCullough 

Schram & Buhrman 
Jewelers 



BOTH PHONES 



JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 




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Everything 

to completely furnish 

the home 

Wallace-Nutting Pictures 

Quality, Service, Satisfaction 

The Best Place to Trade, after all. 



If you are grateful to the advertisers for their help in sup- 
porting our magazine — Say it with trade. 



Smith Federal 
Bakery 



Cleanliness 
is your buy word 

Quality 

is our watch-word 



F. J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
popular fancies of Late Fashion, always featuring the 
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F. J. Waddell & Company 



Y OU will be pleased with our fine line of 
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Gifts TLat Please . . . 

RUSSELL & THOMPSON 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BUR 



The Home of Better 
Shoe Repairing 

223 WEST MORGAN STREET 



Something to buy? 
Get it at a Greetings store. 



"The Home of Crispette" 

The Sanitary 

Pop-corn and 
Crispette Shop 

Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Loop Cafeteria and 
Care 



POPULAR PRICES 



WEST MORGAN STREET 



COME TO- 



LORETHS I 

Fr Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coats 

Kubota's Studio 

Specialty of High Grade Work 

KODAK FINISHING 
IIVA East State Street 



Jos. Burgert 


DORWARTS 


Dealer in 


Cask Market 


Good Shoes 


CHOICE MEATS 




OF ALL KINDS 


No. 26 


Both Phones 196 


North Side of Square 


No. 230 WEST STATE STREET 





Cully Coffee Company 

The Home of Good Coffee 



PHONE 268 



222 WEST STATE ST. 



Everything m Dry Goods and 
Millinery 

FLORETH'S 

West Side Dry Goods Co. 



A 

Good Place 

To 

Trade 



A 

Good Place 
To 
Trade 



Widmayer's High Grade Meals, Etc. 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 
W. F. Widmayer C. E. Segner 



Cosgriff's Coffee and Waffle 

Shop 



FAMOUS 

Opposite Court House 



WAFFLES 

West State Street 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



The Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the Hour 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARE 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 19C9 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle 
West, in a beautiful, dignified, old college town, noted 
for its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are looking 
for a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS 

n n n n 



BAKERIES 

Ideal Baking Co. 
Smith Federal Bakery 

BANKS 

Ayers National Bank 
Farrell State Bank 

BOOK STORES— OFFICE SUP'S 

Lane's 

W. B. Rogers 

Book and Novelty Shop 

Ye Booke Shoppe 

CLOTHING STORES 

Frank Byrns' Hat Store 
Myers' Bros. 
Tom Duffner 

CONFECTIONERS 

W. S. Ehnie & Bro. 
Bonansinga 
Princess Candy Co. 
Peacock Inn 
Crispette Shop 
Mullenix & Hamilton 

DOCTORS 

Dr. W. 0. Wait 

DRUG STORES 

Armstorog Drug Stores 
Coover Drug Co. 
Gilbert's Drug Stores 

DRY GOODS. READY-TO-WEAR 

C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Floreth's (East Side) 

Floreth's (West Side) 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Co. 

Rabjohn & Reid 

Shanken's 

F. J. Waddell 

DYEING AND CLEANING 

A. E. Schoedsack 
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 

Jacksonville Ry and Light Co. 
Walsh Electric Co. 

FLORISTS 

Harry Hofmann 
Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FURNITURE STORES 

Peoples' Furniture Co. 
Andre & Andre 



GROCERS 

Economy Cash Market 

Leek's 

Jenkinson-Bode, Wholesale 

Piggly Wiggly 

J. H. Zell 

Vasconcellos 

HARDWARE STORES 

Brady Bros. 
HOTELS 

New Pacific Hotel 
The Dunlap 

JEWELERS 

Bassetts 

Schram & Buhrman 

Russell & Thompson 

MEAT MARKETS 

Wiegand 

Widmjayer 

Dorwart's Cash Market 

MILLINERY 

H. J. Smith 
Miller Hat Shop 

MUSIC HOUSES 

J. Bart Johnson 
J. B. Brown 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Spieth's Studio 
Mollenbrok & McCullough 

PRINTING 

Courier Company 

Roach Press (East State St) 

Artcraft Printing Office 

RESTAURANTS 

Vickery's Colonial Inn 

Cafe Batz 

Cosgriff's Coffee & Waffle Shop 

Loop Cafeteria 

SECOND HAND STORES 

Easley Second Hand Store 

SHOE SHOP AND REPAIRS 

L. L. Burton 
Jos Burgert 
Hopper & Son 
Mathis, Kamm & Shibe 
Jas. Mc Ginnis 
Edwin Smart Shoe Co. 

THEATERS 

Luttrell's Majestic Theater 

Scotts' 

Rialto 



THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORES 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 
74 5. SIDE SQ. 

Buckthorpe Brothers 

Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 



Schram & Buhrman 
Jewelers 

BOTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



Wiegand Market 

2^4 E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 
Quality and Service our Motto 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lane's Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 



It's Well Worth Considering 



Fancy Box Stationery 
Address Books 



Program Pencils 
Wanl Gold and Silver 
Eversharp Pencils 



313 W. STATE ST. \J\J R R aerQ 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS ■* ** ■ ■—*• * ^ **-*€» ^~ * ^ 



Use Brazola Coffee 

Sold by 

Jenkinson-Bode Co. 

Coffee Roasters and 

Wholesale Grocers 



Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
EVENING COURIER 

For Today's News 



FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
Catalogues, Pamphlets, Letter- 
Heads, etc., at lowest prices. 



WOMAN'S FURS 

The styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

FRANK BYRNS ha s t tor E 
Economy Grocery 

Q "ST c s°t u ate F ^r ice PURE FOODS 

Illnois Phone 49 



Box of Fine Stationery 

Hammermill Bond 

250 Sheets of Paper and 250 Envelopes $2.25 

Roach Printing Office 

Opposite Post Office 



These shops aren't advertising to see themselves in print — 
they want, and deserve, ~>ur patronoge. 



_ 



BRADY BROS 


MYERC 


EVERYTHING IN 


MffiNur 


Hardware 


Exclusive Agents 


House Furnishings, Paints 


Hartman ^^ardrobe Trunks 


Auto Tires and 


Complete Line Hand Baggagi 


Supplies 


Mannish 


45-47 South Side Square 


Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ezard 

The Book ana Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETINGS 1 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILLE 



I still believe in and sell "QUALITY" foot-'' 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 




Spietl) Stu6io 

Photography In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 
Portraiture 
S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

("Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 North Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 


The 


KNOWN FOR 


Artcrart Printing 


Ready-to-Wear 


Office 


and 


213 WEST MORGAN S 


POPULAR PRICED 


Telephone 400 


Dry Goods 


EMIL HARWE 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORK* 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388— Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 
Everything Musical J 

49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 


AT YOUR SERVICE 
FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 




YOUR FILMS TO US 


GROCERY 


±ne Armstrong 


A good place to get good things 
to eat at a reasonable 


Drug Store 


price 


QUALITY STORES 




S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State S 


EAST STATE STREET 


Jacksonville, 111. 



ihankens 

MVoman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
tore will give you a better 
lea as to what is new. 



W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 



322-324 East State Street 



y& ^fcooke Styoppe 



SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



TFiite Stationery 
ati& 

Gift Sbop Novelties 



J. P. BROWN 

Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 



TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 



19 South Side Square 

Jacksonville 



HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 



CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 
Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 
tore: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



H. J. SMITH 

MILLINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 
LADIES' HOSIERY 

South Side Square 



J 

\X7^ ~ 4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

W am TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 

FLOWERS FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER I1N 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

Telephone 59 229 E. State St. 




%) Always 



, FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

SSllX™ *™ FOR BRUSHES AND 

UKUb ** u ' FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT— 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 

OF FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

We Repair TJ /^W TT* X~> Tj^ T~> ^-J We shine 
Shoes H VJ MT MT Hi Jt<L SS Shoes 

On the Cornet 

For Tnoae \Vno Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies' Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFNER 

// it's New— We Have It 10 WEST SIDE SQ. 



EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 



72 E. Side Square 



Telephone 130 



Woman's College girls can always find a complete 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Tomlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 



C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

EVERYTHING IN 

DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 

Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

EAST STATE STREET 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH] 

Made Clean Sold Clean 

EAT 

MORE 

BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us aupply the eats for your next feed 



© \) e <£ o 1 1 d g e <5 r e e t i n 3 5 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

When Girls First Came to the Woman's College 

Founder's Day 

Facts for Reference 

From the Cradle to the Court 

The Honor System — Is It Working? 

Grades Are Too High! 

The Commentator 

Sport Dope 

To One Well Loved 

The Struggle of Charging Ironshooter 

Alpha Pi Delta 

Speed 

Editorials 

Parsonage Sketches 

Class Officers 



24 
28 
28 
30 

3i 

32 

34 
35 
37 
37 
41 
42 

43 
47 
49 



X5\)Q. (TolUge (Greetings 



WHEN GIRLS FIRST CAME TO THE WOMAN'S 

COLLEGE. 

This lively sketch of life at I. W. C. about 1850 was found 
in an 1897 issue of the Greetings. It was evidently written by 
a woman who had been a student here when the college was first 
opened in 1847, and who wanted to show the girls of '97 that 
the girls of the fifties were human. The sketch is unsigned, but 
whoever the author is or was, we thank her and borrow her arti- 
cle from '97 for the enjoyment of 1922. 

"When the sessions were held in the basement of the old 
East Charge all the girls boarded in private families, and were 
under no restrictions outside school hours. When the build- 
ing was completed we began rooming in it. Our rooms were 
warmed with the old Todd stoves, and lighted with candles. 
The halls were as cold as Greenland." 

The Height of Fashion 

"School began in September and closed in July, ten months 
with no vacation except a few days at Christmas. Sometimes a 
party of eight or ten girls would be the guests of another girl 
during these brief holidays, making the journey to and from her 
home in a two-horse wagon. Once it was a wedding party, 
miles away in the country, when the mud was bottomless, on a 
cold mid-winter day, but we bloomed out in thin dresses with 
low necks and short sleeves. The bride's gown was of peach- 
blow barege, with a plain full skirt and a pointed bodice, long 
flowing sleeves lined back to the elbows with peach-blow satin 
that showed the fine white lace under-sleeves. Her bonnet was 
a white straw lined with puffed white silk with enormous clust- 
ers of lilies of the valley on one side and tied with broad white 
satin ribbon under the chin. The hair was combed down and 
slightly puffed over the ears. 

"One girl excited general interest by appearing one morn- 
ing with her hair in the regulation puff on one side, while on 
the other side it was brushed or "roached" straight back. She 
explained that she had two sweethearts, one liked the puff and 
the other the "roach", and she was endeavoring to please them 
both." 



24 



Ol)c College (Greetings 



Radical Suffragettes 

"Occasions of display were not frequent, and as I recall it 
now, the chief diversions were revival meetings. In '52, a revival 
of great power practically broke up the school work for several 
days. Prayer meetings were held during recitation hours. The 
influence of the revival was felt more in the College than any- 
where else and resulted in the conversion of almost every student. 
Once in a great while a lecturer came this way. Mrs.Frances Gage, 
a pioneer in the suflrage movement, was one of these. At the 
commencement of her lecture she said: "We hear a great deal in 
these days about a woman's sphere. I think I lost my sphere long 
ago when as a girl I had to drive the cows to the pasture and in 
the winter carry an axe along with me to break the ice for them 
to drink." She won many of us to a belief in what was then a 
new and unpopular doctrine. 

"Once in every five months we gave a public exhibition, 
which served the two-fold purpose of developing latent talent 
and of keeping the cause of the College constantly before the 
people. At one of these an unique conversation between an in- 
habitant of Earth and a visiting sister from the Moon won much 
applause. Even political subjects were handled. "The Dissolu- 
tion of the Union" was a topic of debate so early as '54, and 
Dr. Akers pronounced the speech of the girl who spoke for the 
Union a fine one. 

"Persons who still recall that commencement when Helen 
Wilman gave her oration on "Our Country", with its anti- 
slavery sentiment, and the thrilling scene enacted on the plat- 
form at the close, have not forgotten that Governor Yates said 
of the production that it "was worthy to have been heard in the 
halls of Congress." 

This Might Happen Now 

"These exhibitions were notable events and always drew 
large crowds. It was the custom in those days to seat all women 
whether the men were seated or not. One evening three young 
men came early and received seats very near the stage next to 
the partition, and were congratulating themselves that they were 

26 



Ol)£ (TolUgfc (Brewings 



not to be disturbed when an old lady who came late observed 
the three men. She walked up the aisles and began shoving in 
so vigorously that a young lady next to one of the young men, 
who was exceedingly bashful, presently found herself seated up- 
on his lap. There was nothing for him to do but move out, 
followed by the other two. 

"The personnel of the faculty was then as it has been since 
— varied. 

"Miss Olin, the sister of the great Stephen J. Olin, was 
much advanced in years and wore a cap. She was very gentle, 
and was much beloved by the girls. And there were girls, even 
in our days, who had small capacity or no desire for receiving in- 
struction, girls who simply imbibed a very little from hearing 
others recite, and never made passable recitations themselves. 
These girls used to try to atone to the gentle lady of the caps 
for their deficiencies by hugging her at the close of recitation with 
a fervor of inextinguishable affection." 

Methods Change, But — 

"Another teacher was currently reported to have been at 
one time "electrified." Her nerves were so shattered that at a 
push or touch the poor lady would almost jump out of her chair, 
and an uplifted finger would sometimes cause her to scream. It 
was a pleasing diversion among some of the girls to brush by her 
and inadvertently poke her with an elbow. Then there was the 
absent-minded professor, whose soul dwelt among such serene 
heights, that whenever a girl needed his help on a problem, he 
always went away with a new decoration pinned to his uncon- 
scious back. 

"One little circumstance connected with another teacher who 
was very stern and exacted much of us all deserves recall. A 
young girl had been guilty of some misdemeanor and was about 
to be expelled. The teacher, of whose severity we were all afraid 
thought it all over — what it would mean for a girl to go home 
with this blight fastened upon her for all the years of her life — 
and she went to the president and pleaded with him to allow 
her to remain. She promised to be responsible for the girl's be- 

26 



Tb\)<i. Collage (Braetinss 






havior. She took her to room with her and so nobly fulfilled her 
trust that she won the girl's life-long gratitude. 

"Art and music received little attention. Reading was prac- 
ticed daily, and we even heard lectures on elocution in those days. 
Spelling and word analysis gave us a valuable ground-work for 
clear expression in writing, which was then the graceful accomp- 
lishment of a college course. We were much given to versify- 
ing, and there was a poetical, reflective cast to the most of our 
effusions." 

A Gentle Rap. Is It Ttue? 

"In chemistry we had a simple apparatus and learned fully 
as many things which we afterwards forgot as are now deemed 
necessary. In fact, there was not such a great difference between 
the course then and the course now, and it is our belief that we 
girls of the early fifties did more earnest, honest studying than 
do the student these days. 

"We came to College often-times at great sacrifice, and we 
had a high conception of what a college education meant. Some 
girls came to fit themselves for teaching, the only respectable call- 
ing except house service then open to women, and even in that 
there was a strong prejudice in many localities against it. Many 
more girls came for a few months only; they came to get a gen- 
eral idea of what higher education meant and some practical 
hints for carrying their work on by themselves." 
Home-making the Aim 

"The girl who wished to prepare herself for a career, who 
had a definite ambition to do original and creative work in music, 
art or literature, had not been born. An education which to-day 
means not a great deal unless one has with it this power of sur- 
passing his fellows in some one line of work, in those days was, 
in itself, a distinction. 

"We had no dream beyond being home-makers as our moth- 
ers had been before us, but that, for the acquisition of which we 
were giving our best energies, was to fit us more perfectly for 
home-making, to render us dispensers of a more graceful hos- 
pitality and to add a glory, all its own, to common life." 



27 



"Gfye (Totkge (Sr^etings 



FOUNDER'S DAY, OCTOBER 10, 1922 

1846-1922. SEVENTY-SIX YEARS 
Light of candles, blue and yellow; 
Voices singing, words that say 
How we love our Alma Mater. 
That was Candle Lighting Day. 

The words were those of our own students and faculty, 
the voices were those of our alumnae as well, who were waiting 
for us, sixty strong, when we came up from dinner, with their 
song in honor of Mrs. Harker, whose birthday made the day a 
double celebration. 

Telegrams and letters from friends of long standing made 
us very happy on this evening. Some of the I. W. C. societies, at 
Chicago, Los Angeles, Kansas City and Springfield, also sent 
greetings. Of special interest were those from the three oldest 
living alumnae: Mrs. Alice McElroy Griffith, 91 years old, of 
the class of 1852; Mrs. Faithful Shipley Ebey, 92 years old, of 
the class of 1853, and Miss Louisa E. Vance, 93 years old, of 
the class of 1855. 

t >TTTTTT< > 

FACTS— KEEP FOR REFERENCE. 

Compiled from President Harker's Oral History of the College. 
ACADEMIC RECOGNITION OF ILLINOIS WOMANS COLLEGE. 

Previous to 1902 the College had maintained from its 
very beginning in 1846 a high standard of scholarship as com- 
pared with the current college standards. It had not, however, 
aspired or pretended to give the full collegiate education, but 
had always included at least one year of the regular collegiate 
course. 

In 1902 the College announced that it would give 2 years 
of college work, which would admit it thereafter to Junior Col- 
lege rank. 

In 1 908 the College added two years more to its curriculum, 
thus acquiring full collegiate rank. The first graduates to re- 
ceive degrees were Neva Wiley and Elizabeth Davis, in 1909. 

In 1 9 1 o the College was recognized by and given member- 

28 



"Dl)£ (TolUge (Greetings 



ship in the North Central Association and also by the Univers- 
ity Senate of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 1 9 1 6 it was listed by the University of Illinois in Class 
A, and has since been recognized in such class by many other 
universities and colleges. 

In 1920 it was placed on the standard list of the Associa- 
tion of American Universities, an honor given to comparatively 
few colleges. 

In 1 92 1 it was admitted to membership in the American 
Association of University Women, giving the privilege of active 
membership in that Association to all graduates of the College 
since 1909. 

The high scholarship of the Illinois Woman's College and 
the unusual community helpfulness and ability of its graduates 
are known and recognized throughout the whole country. 

1 mrnn > 

ADDITIONS TO PROPERTY AND ENDOWMENT SINCE 1898. 

1899 — The East Wing was built. 

1900 — The West Wing was extended. 

1 90 1 — The Lurton property, three acres on the west, was pur- 
chased. 

1902 — The West Front Extension was built. 

1903 — The Self property on the east was purchased. 

1904 — The Power House was built. 

1906 — Music Hall was built. $50,000 Carnegie Endowment 
secured. 

1909 — Harker Hall built and dining-room extension made. 

191 o — Addition to College cottage. 

19 1 3 — $180,000 Endowment and Improvement fund 

1915 — $100,000 Endowment fund. 

1916 — Library extension was built. 

1 9 1 7 — Gymnasimum was built. 

1905-22 — Purchase of surrounding property for campus en- 
largement. 

1921-23 — $500,000 Endowment and Improvement fund. 

29 



Z5l)£ College (Greetings 



FROM THE CRADLE TO THE COURT. 

Miss (Margie) Hamilton tells what it feels like to belong to the 

faculty. 

When I was called aside one day, 
And asked to set in brazen print 
My delicate thoughts in public view! 
To state them freely without stint! 
I absentmindedly answered "yes". 
Alas, I realize my error! 
For when I think what eyes will read 
Then I am filled with mortal terror. 
For should I dare commit myself 
And call the student state superior, 
I would confess myself inferior. 
But should I laud the faculty 
And praise their life the most, 
(However low I rank myself) 
I might be said to boast. 
Yet there is much that I can say 
With safety and propriety, 
With due regard for everything 
Nor undue notoriety. 
It awes me much to grace the roster, 
But really, when there's a stunt 
Or we have a speaker in chapel, 
— It's nicer to be up in front. 
It's harder not to laugh up there 
And easier to get amused. 
Absence from the faculty meetings 
Cannot be orally excused. 
But there's a glorious advantage, 
And great is the praise that it entitles. 
— I don't have to study half the night 
Whenever I come from late recitals! 



30 



I31)* College (Breetings 



THE HONOR SYSTEM— IS IT WORKING? 

In answering this question, the average student would say- 
one of two things. If she were in a very good humor, and all 
was right with her world, she would answer, "I should say it 
is! Why it's a hundred per cent better than the proctor system! 
I like this independence and honor line." But if you approached 
her after a long, sleepless night during which her neighbors next 
door had a feed, and those on her left had a truth party, and 
those on her right stayed up to study and incidentally to torture a 
ukelele, she would answer, no doubt, in a very different tone. 

But to go back to our question — is the honor system work- 
ing? It seems to me that it is impossible to pronounce a verdict 
on a thing so young. It is true that too many girls take ad- 
vantage of the system to further their own good times. Many 
indiscretions arise from thoughtlessness. But young people have 
always been and will always continue to be thoughtless, so why 
blame it on the honor system? 

Other colleges have honor systems. Some of them work 
wonderfully well, others but indifferently. Some of them 
have high ideals, others, indifferent ones, and their honor is 
generally in proportion to their ideals. Where is there a college 
with ideals higher than those of I. W. C? Where is there a col- 
lege president who has striven harder to instil honor into his 
students than our own? We have a fine bunch of girls this 
year, and it would seem a pity for our ideals to be 
judged as of a lower order because of our inability to live 
up to our honor system. 

There is but one way to make our honor system a success, 
that is, let every girl look to her own honor, and leave out the 
knocks on the honor of her fellow students. When the honor 
system reaches this stage, we can honestly say, "y cs "' when we 
are asked if it is working. — Sophomore. 

I "ttttt< > 

Junior — We'd have a circus if those two guys were here. 

Frosh — What two guys? 

Junior — Barnum and Bailey. — Ex. 

31 



Ofye College (Breetings 



Vol. XXVI. Jacksonville, III., Nov., 1 922 No. 2 

STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 

Associate Editor Eloise Calhoun 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 

GRADES ARE TOO HIGH! 

The Scholarship Honors for 1921-22, as published in last 
month's Greetings provided interesting and astonishing reading. 
Practically the whole Senior class was on the list; over two-thirds 
of the Juniors and more than half of the whole enrollment of 
the school. That seems a wonderful showing. Evidently the 
Woman's College receives only the choicest of choice students, 
and brings out the best in them. 

So much for the outward appearance, as noted by the in- 
dulgent eye. But some of us know better: how we "pulled" that 
B plus in — when'Ve didn't open a book all year except at exam 
time.." The bright and shining light of our high school class 
whose special forte was that particular subject, and who even 
"boned" all Christmas vacation on a special report, wrote ex- 
citedly from her University that she had received a B, — "and 
there were only about five in the whole class who got even that. 
You're taking it too, aren't you? What did you make?" Remem- 
ber how we neglected to answer that question? 

That A in Astronomy, we'll remember that; it did mean 
work and perhaps we did deserve it, but we never thought our- 
selves exceptional students, and we thought A's should be re- 
served for exceptional students. At least Dr. Harker in his talk 
to the Fundamentals class tells the Freshmen that any new girl 
making an average of 80 is doing very good work for a college 

32 



*5\)<i. College ©reelings 



student. It should mean as much as a 90 in High school. Forty 
per cent of the Freshmen last year had an average above 85 — are 
girls as a whole that much brighter than our president expects? 

When we go home this Christmas, and discuss school papers 
with our friends, won't you be a little hesitant about showing 
those honor lists?We'll hear, "I thought I. W. C. had only 300 
students. Do your honor rolls include everyone?" We'd rather 
have a B we could be proud of than an A that we feel ought to 
be hidden under a basket, wouldn't we? And perhaps if the 
grades on dizzy heights were scarce and more difficult to obtain, 
we might exercise our minds in obtaining them. — A Senior. 

Editor's note — We will not deny the existence of courses 
that can be passed by a final craw as the only studying, but feel 
that the above article gives the impression that they are more 
numerous than they actually are. The main point of the article, 
however, we heartily support; — grades, BOTH for honest daily 
work and for "snap" courses, are too high. 

t iTrrrra > 



STAFF OF THE ILLIWOCO 



Editor-in-Chief 
Associate Editor 
Art Editor 
Calendar 
Humor 

Manager 

Assistants — 
Adviser 



Business Staff 



Audrey King 

Luro Anderson 

Avis Murphy 

Esther Purl 

Katherine Yanseck 



Katherine Randle 
-Harriet Munson, Lucile Vick, Elaine Rosness. 

Miss Whitmer 

I UTTTTL 1 



We welcome Ruth Harker Hunt and her husband on their 
visit here. The College was until the last few years Ruth's only 
home, and to the Seniors at least it is very natural to see her at 
the Harker table. 



33 



Ol)£ (Toliege (Greetings 



THE COMMENTATOR 

OF MEN 

How much we must regret that no sage has ever found and 
immortalized the truth that men are the root of all evil. They 
cause evil not only among themselves, but more frequently than 
anything else, break up the tranquillity of a group of naturally 
congenial females. One look, too interested, one phrase too kind- 
ly spoken, and the damage is done. 

We write thus cynically because we are growing old. We 
almost believe our day has gotten to it's mid-night. And so we 
now take time to play the spectator rather than the actor. Yet we 
believe that there is truth in what we say. Has no one noticed a 
certain veiled "cattiness" which rivalry for men produces? 

I >TTTTTT< > 

THE INQUIRING NOSE. 

The figure of the neighborhood snoop is one which has al- 
ways caused us beaucoup d' amusement, but when even we, the 
innocent Spectator, have a long curved nose, well formed for 
scenting scandal, thrust in at our door, we lose our attitude of 
philosophic amusement and struggle with the desire to seize the 
nose and grapple with it. 

It entered into our domicile the other day. We sensed it com- 
ing and hastened to put away all written matter, don a mask, and 
warn our friends. And when it arrived, what a lot of cautious 
squirming and sniffing to catch any possible unguarded items. 
Oh, bring on the cayenne! 

Well, the nose (as well as the mouth, eyes and ears) we have 
always with us. Yet what a joy it would be if the nose could be 
reduced to a normal A nose. 

< >TTTTTT< \ 

The main difference between students and faculty is that 
when faculty put in a day's work they don't feel like running 
around nights, but when students put in the night running 
around they don't feel like working days. — Ex. 

34 



Orje College (Brewings 



SHADOWS OF COMING EVENTS. 

NOVEMBER 

1 2- 1 8 — World Fellowship Week of prayer. 

13 — Maurice Dumesnil, pianist. 

16 — Student Day. 

18 — Town Girl's Entertainment. 

20 — Junior-Senior Party. Mid-semester reports. 

27 — Miss Horsbrugh and Miss Sapio, recital. 

30 — Thanksgiving. Dramatic Club plays. 

DECEMBER 
1-3 — Student Volunteer Conference. 
4 — Y. W. C. A. Bazaar. Miss Davis' recital. 

< nana > 
SPORT DOPE 

They have asked me who is going to win the hockey tour- 
nament. I don't know, but I have my own opinion. Haven't 
you yours? I have always put my money on the class of '24 
and usually I lose it; this year I won't. Do you know about our 
teams? 

Now, the class of '23 used to have a dandy team; that was 
a long time ago before their sophomore class was split in two. 
No longer do they whirl in the society of success for one can not 
win a game now because of the length of the opponent's skirt 
or the awkwardness of the opposite gloved hands. The seniors, 
we'll admit, have the extra avoirdupois and they can absolutely 
fill up their striking circle with their goal keeper, Alma Blodget, 
and their right full back, Flo. But let us not worry about this, 
Juniors, because Alma never could tell directions and she may 
step aside and put the ball through for us. ("Huh!" — Seniors) . 

The Juniors, class of '24, are a good all around bunch — 
ask Miss Boyd about their class spirit and their sportsmanship. 
There are a few on the team who help the team; many help the 
opponent's team, and some do not help either. They play a 
smooth steady game at first and then gradually pep up until the 
opponents are so amazed at the display of goal shooting that 
they stand still and watch — until the score is called. 

35 



Olje (Tollege (Breetin^s 



If the Freshmen come to the Thanksgiving banquet with 
shins skinned and knees knocked, you'll know that it's because 
the grass was too green. This is one time when their pro- 
tective resemblance does not stand well for them. Freshmen 
usually get along with very few fouls because they strictly ob- 
serve all rules. At least Hazel I. will not be called for kicking 
the ball; the referee will have to watch "coaching on the field." 

Our two new games this year are soccer and volley ball. 
Some of the soccer players can kick the ball all the way over to 
the cottage; others are not habitual kickers. Although Lola Lesar 
will soon appear on the field wearing a face guard and Vivian 
Pires knee protectors, such trappings are largely for looks, for 
the players sustain very few injuries. 

Volley ball attracts our young flappers. They are all play- 
ing because it increases the size of the hands and makes one 
graceful. Miss Wiersema also has a peculiar affinity for the 
game. Do you think it is for any of the above reasons she is 
playing? Is it because of the ball or the position of the field? 

As for tennis, the old courts do not know themselves. The 
new wire, the lack of leaves and the rubber soles pounding up 
and down please their ancient athletic nature. We have some 
good material this year and quite a bit of real tennis spirit. That 
is the spirit that gets you out of bed at six o'clock and keeps 
you out there playing through dinner. Marian Prout comes 
from the East with her real New Jersey methods. Any one who 
has seen her play knows she plays a dandy game. She will offer 
some resistance when Winnie Potter at last consents to really 
play. Can you tell me something? Is Winnie Potter's serve 
natural or acquired? Janette Meredith is putting something 
over on the rest of the tennis players. She gets extra practice bat- 
ting molecules around at night in her dreams. 

It's hard to pick out a winner so early in the season, but 
it's always safe to bet on the class of '24. Hockey Ball, Tennis 
Ball, Soccer and Volley Ball, you tell'em we're all right! 

< >TTTTTT< > 



A Freshman was found the other day who thought you 
cool a car by stripping the gears. — D. V. 



36 



"Dlje. College i&reettttgs 






TO ONE WELL LOVED. 
— After hearing Dumesnil. 

A master made music tonight; 
And I took each glorious tone, 
And shut it away in my heart 
To save it's beauty for thee. 
For I hoard all things of light, 
That when we come to our own 
We may never know or fear the dark, 
O Sharer of Life with me. 

I >TTTTTTi ) 

THE STRUGGLE OF CHARGING IRONSHOOTER 
By Irma Sturdevant 

(A story based on true incidents of the old Rosebud Indian 
Reservation of South Dakota.) 

Charging Ironshooter sat in the doorway of the old log 
cabin as he watched the evening sun spread an iridescent glow 
across the western sky, and the dark outline of Rattlesnake butte 
reminded him of a gate between the surrounding prairie and that 
beautiful realm of glorious color beyond. Charging contemplated 
this scene, not without a stir of emotion and reverence for the 
supreme things of nature in which dwelt his god. In his heart 
there was a turmoil which caused him to restlessly shift about at 
times. Then he became quiet and with eyes that seemed to see 
beyond gazed out towards the setting sun. 

The hay had been cut and stacked. Freighters were hauling 
supplies of coal for the winter. The grain crops had been har- 
vested. Autumn was here. Yes, Charging knew that. The 
birds were starting for the southland. Crisp cool breezes rustled 
the leaves which were already turning to beautiful shades of red 
and brown. All this meant just one thing to Charging, "school". 
It had a sinster meaning for him and he dreaded the thoughts of 
leaving the lazy carefree life to return to boarding school. 

The prospects of a dull winter ahead made him somber and 
silent. Running Bear, his old grandmother, who had taken 
care of Charging since he was a tiny papoose, watched him with 

37 



Olje College (Greetings 



consternation in her eyes. He had formed the habit of taking 
long rides on Pinto, his little pony, and when he emerged from 
the path that led through the thicket near the cabin, she marked 
how his brooding eyes glanced into space apparently searching 
for something far out on the horizon. When she spoke to him 
he did not hear. Always, he was silent when Running Bear re- 
proved him and she was unable in any way to discover his inner- 
most thoughts. 

Soon, the day came when Charging must leave for the gov- 
ernment school. Running Bear accompanied him on his journey 
to the Southwest and stayed with him until she thought him 
settled for the winter. 

The seclusion of the school life was oppressing to the Indian 
lad, but he found agreeable companionship with King Eagle 
Feather, another Indian of about his own age. The two would 
sit silent in their classes, giving no response to the patient in- 
structors. Charging would yield neither to reason nor persua- 
sion. It was clear in his own mind, that contrary to his own 
wishes he was being forced to learn the education of the white 
man. Contrary to his nature, he had to stay in a certain limited 
territory set apart from that which he loved, the wild freedom of 
open spaces. Now, this joyous liberty was his no more. In 
silent obstinancy Charging continued his tasks and lived his life 
at the boarding school apart from the others except for his one 
friend King Eagle Feather. 

One morning Charging and King were missing at the morn- 
ing assembly of students. The superintendent, who was ac- 
quainted with Charging's obviously permanent dissatisfaction, 
immediately sent out government officials in search of the two 
boys. With aid of a cow boy, who knew the country well, 
the Indian lads were soon located and brought back to school. 

On his return, Charging became more and more restless. 
Hatred grew within his breast. Life seemed to him unfair. He 
was unable to determine the cause of all this injustice, or why 
these unpleasant conditions should become his fate. 

Charging was very fond of music. He loved the lilt and 

38 



^>l)£ College (Breedings 



rhythm of the old Indian love songs, and the chants and weird 
tunes sung by the old medicine men. He sat at the piano one 
day, listlessly fingering the keys and transposing chords of some 
soft melody to a minor key. King sat nearby listening. Turn- 
ing to his friend, Charging looked at him with far-seeing, pierc- 
ing black eyes, and slowly and thoughtfully he said, "King, 
everything as it moves, now and then, here and there, makes 
stops. The bird as it flies stops in one place to make it's nest 
and in another to rest in its flight. And man when he goes 
forth stops when he wills. So the God has stopped." "And 
where has the god made stops?" asked the curious but serious 
minded King. Directing his gaze out through the window, 
Charging replied. "The sun, which is so bright and beautiful, is 
one place where he has stopped. The moon, the stars, the 
winds, he has been with. The trees, the animals, are all where 
he has stopped, and the Indian thinks of these places and sends 
his prayers there to reach the place where the god has stopped 
with help and blessing. Tomorrow, I shall leave this place. I 
have offered my prayers to the spirit of the buffalo and he will 
help; to-morrow and then Charging will be happy." 

The morrow came with a cold wind from the northwest. 
The old weather prophets predicted snow. At twilight, the 
silent Charging walked slowly and stealthily around to the back 
of the building and went in. Crouching against the wall, he 
stole warily down the back stairs to the furnace room. There 
in a corner, he placed the rags and oil to which he set fire. Quick- 
ly but silently he then passed out of the building. 

The fire alarm was given. The Indian boys and girls ran 
to and fro, unintelligibly screaming in Indian and broken Eng- 
lish. In vain did the instructors endeavor to keep quiet among 
the disorderly students. The rooms were filled with a dense 
black stifling smoke as hot red flames leaped higher and higher. 
The northwest wind drove the hissing flames on and on. The 
partially burned walls crashed to the ground, and fresh flames 
burst forth creating an awful heat in the cold winter night. A 
mass of gleaming light came pouring out of the windows that 



39 



^?l)£ (TolUge (Greeting* 



had not yet fallen. A dense dark fog rose up from the blaze 
like some monstrous black demon reaching for the sky. Its 
stifling odor was discerned at great distances from the source. 
The destruction of the boarding school was complete. 

A few rods distant from the fire, away from the surging 
crowd, stood Charging Ironshooter. With his hands out- 
stretched towards the heavens, he thanked the good god Tunkam 
for answering his prayers and freeing him from the bands that 
had held him. No more would he have to return. He reveled 
in the heat of the fire. Exultingly he inhaled that smoke. It 
meant his freedom. With a sense of abandonment he started to- 
wards the land of the setting sun, back to his old grandmother. 
He had gone but a short distance when he met King Eagle Feath- 
er. One look at his friend's usually impassive face, and King 
knew the cause of the destruction of the school. The light of 
fiendish glee in those dark flashing eyes before him told that. One 
look passed between the two friends, no word was spoken but 
there was silent understanding and they journeyed together on 
that bleak winter's night. 

The boys had no provision and no horses, so like Indian 
runners of old they crossed the prairie on foot, bound eastward 
for the camp of Okreek which they hoped to reach by daybreak. 

As they went on and on the wind became stronger and cold- 
er, the stars put out their twinkling lights, a bleak cloud spread 
over the heavens. White flakes began to fall through the air. The 
boys could not face the fierce wind that came swooping down 
across the prairie. They stumbled along, making little progress 
toward the Indian camp. The blinding snow came thicker and 
faster. It beat against their faces. The boys staggered forth on 
feet that were numb from the cold. Large drifts were beginning 
to form. With faltering steps they plunged through them. The 
wind came in gusts. The wet snow formed thin sheets of ice on 
their almost frozen faces. 

After plunging along in the snow for hours, Charging, even 
more exhausted than his weary companion, could no longer face 
the raging tempest. The life which he had found to be so 

40 



T5I)<j (TolUge (Breetittgs 






stormy was about to end. To no avail were King's efforts to urge 
him on. Removing his own buckskin wrap, the faithful friend 
wrapped it around the body of Charging, then went on alone in- 
to the black night. The moaning wind as it swooped around in 
circular motion made spectral phantoms of the snow. On and on 
he went until in the distance he saw a faint glow of light. It 
was the Okreek camp. By the time he reached his destination a 
faint glow spread across the eastern horizon. The wind subsided, 
the snow had almost ceased. 

King told his story at the camp. A searching party was soon 
formed and the horsemen made their way across the bleak and 
desolate white prairie. After a few hours the lost boy was 
found. He lay in a heap, half buried in snow. His 
unrelentless attitude toward the civilization of the white 
man had brought young Charging Ironshooter to an untimely 
death. Like the pitiful cry of a child was the Indian's vague 
feeling after unity. He could not understand. 

( >nimcz=zD 

ALPHA PI DELTA 
On October 23 the new members of Alpha Pi Delta and 
quite a few of last year's members met in their hall. Martha 
Logan, the president from last year, presided. The following of- 
ficers were installed in a simple but impressive ceremony. 
President — Marjorie Slough 
Vice-President — Frances Griswold. 
Secretary — Clyde Connell. 
Treasurer — Helen Wilson. 
Sargent-at-Arms — Elva Becker. 
Chaplain — Catherine Walker. 
Pianist — Mildred Blan. 
Chorister — Ruth Leech. 
Reporter — Vivian Pires. 
All the members are enthusiastic and anxious to make Alpha 
Pi Delta even better this year. November 1 is the birthday of 
the society and the old and new members celebrated by having 
a birthday party on Saturday evening, November 4, in their hall. 

41 



Oi)e (Tollege Greetings 



SPEED 

By Margaret Dryden 

A good description from "comp" class that will bring memories. 

There were eight of us in the car. We had been at a ball 
game about fifteen miles from home and as we had waited for 
some of the players who were to go home with us, we were late 
in getting a start from the field and the other cars were ahead. 

With a chorus of "Let's have a little speed", and an "all 
right, let's go" from the driver we were off. Everyone was 
laughing, as we had won the ball game and our nerves were still 
keyed up, and craving excitement. 

As we reached the edge of town Jack threw on the cutout, 
his face breaking into a broad smile as he shouted, "Did you say 
speed? Here we go." He slid a little lower into his seat and 
pitched his cap over into the back. His hands were held tightly 
on the steering wheel, his eyes were fixed steadily on the road in 
front of him except for quick glances to the left or right as we 
neared some side road. We stopped talking, and sat forward 
rather tensely as we too watched the road. 

We were by our first car so quickly that their shouts came 
to us but faintly as our car seemed to leap to greater speed. We 
passed others, getting only a glimpse of startled faces as their 
cars swung over to the side of the road. 

As we drew near Marissa, Jack slowed down, and we be- 
gan talking again, laughing at the expressions on each other's 
faces as we straightened our hair and relaxed into more comfort- 
able positions. "Speed!" said Jane grimly. "I've had enough — 
for a while." 

( mum ) 

Ain't it terrible to have Miss Lobdell or Miss Anderson call 
on everyone on the roll in regular order right up to your name, 
then skip to the bottom and start toward you again? — D. V. 



Cheek is the sub-soil of Rouge. 

Ethel Morris — Charlotte, is Baton Rouge any good? 

Charlotte — Don't know. Haven't tried it. 



42 



"Drje (Toilers (BreetittQs 




"But I don't have time!" That could, perhaps, be termed 
the college cry, at any rate the Woman's College cry. "I don't 
have time". It's an easy thing to say and it can be said without 
oflending the other fellow, or our own conscience; but it is a 
cowardly thing, when you know that you have time for any- 
thing under the sun that you truly want to do, such as seeing 
Rudolph Valentino in his latest picture, "The Wonderful Lov- 
er." 

One of the things that you don't have time to do is patron- 
ize the library magazines; no, patronize is not quite right, take 
advantage of is the word. Perhaps you don't see any opportu- 
nity in a rackful of magazines that are available in any public 
library, book shop, or drug store. The opportunity is not in 
the fact that they are there in your school library, but in the 
material that these magazines contain. 

You come to college to become educated, but being educated 
does not consist merely of knowing that the equation of every 
parabola is Y squared equals 4ax, or that the Magna Charta was 
signed in 12 15, or that Spenser wrote "The Faerie Queene". 
Being educated, then, does not consist of simply a fund of know- 
ledge; we might say it begins there. Your accumulation of facts 
is your foundation on which to erect a truly educated person. 
The framework of this structure is an up-to-date acquaintance- 
ship with a great many subjects, of which the most important 
are literature, art, knowledge of world affairs and world leaders. 
There is where the opportunity of these magazines comes in. 

43 



Obe College (Breetings 



You get the point? You purely remember the "fifteen minutes a 
day" advertisement of Dr. Elliot. He asserted that fifteen min- 
utes a day spent in reading the contents of his five foot bookshelf 
would give a man the equivalent of a college education. We say 
that a daily half hour spent on good magazines will give you a 
start toward being an educated person. You haven't time? But 
you have, if you want it. Think of the time you waste when 
chapel lets out early, when there are rolls for lunch and you get 
out of the dining-rom early, when you stand around the halls 
and talk and talk and talk — about whether you'd rather go to 
a show or stay home and get up your history notebook. 

The library magazines are varied and many, and are all in- 
teresting if you take time to get interested. The "Greetings" is 
giving the library five magazines for the year: The American 
Poetry Magazine, Life, The Saturday Evening Post, The Book- 
man, and Vanity Fair. Among these and the regular library 
magazines you may find one for your particular need. Let the 
ultra-serious student spend a few minutes with Life, let the 
matter-of-fact soul turn to the Poetry magazine; do your reading 
with the aim of being truly educated. — Dorothy Dieman. 



Dimnc 



D. V. suggests that as a balance to the Commentator in 
which we register our kicks, we mention things to be admired. 
So we will now render 

A Hymn of praise 

To 

The girl who wears her own clothes. 

The teacher who cancels a test for the day after the Symphony. 

The cookie that breaks in four pieces. 

The room-mate who closes the windows in the morning. 

The friend who returns the borrowed dime. 

The teacher who realizes that you may have an individual 

opinion. 
The maid who refills your water-glass when the mustard is hot. 
The girl who answers the corridor phone. 

44 



Oljc College Greetings 



STUDENT FRIENDSHIP FUND. 
Two hundred dollars was the amount given by I. W. C. to 
the Student Friendship Fund for the needs of the students of 
war ravaged Europe, as a result of the talk by Miss Margaret 
Quayle, a relief worker, on October 18th. This subscription 
should have been much larger. Non-attendance at the meeting 
at which Miss Quayle spoke probably accounted for this, as it 
is impossible to realize the situation of these students without 
listening to one who has been a part of it. To have these students 
of Russia brought to us so vividly that we seemed to see them 
was of more value to us as women than all the next day's lessons 
which some of you stayed away to prepare. "Don't let your 
studies interfere with your college education." 

I >T7lllli ) 

From a letter received by the Student Volunteer Band we 
quote the following: 

"Students who were made world citizens by the world war 
would do well to look to China. Here is the place to spend 
one's life. For the next generation the Pacific Basin will be the 
center of the world. The tides from all the seas are flowing this 
way, and one cannot live in China without feeling the push and 
pull of these world influences. Having a part in this developing 
civilization brings zest and excitement hard to be equaled at 
home — really equaled only in a few of the biggest jobs in 
America." 

I >TTTTTT< > 

If I were a man, 

I'd put on my oldest pair of corduroy pants, 

And a disreputable flannel shirt, 

And take a walk, 

And let the air and the tobacco calm my nerves. 

But I'm a girl! 
So I relieve my nerves 
By hauling my clothes out of the closet, 
And taking them down to the cookerie, 
And banging them viciously 
With an electric iron. 
45 



T5Y)t College (Greetings 



DON'T YOU? 

I think that life is quite a bore 

Don't you? 
But yet I want to live some more, 

Don't you? 
When lessons pile up, and I know 
The grades I'm pulling are quite low 
'Tis then, in thought, I homeward go. 

Don't you? 

Yet when I'm home, I think of school. 

Don't you? 
I really hate to be a fool, 

Don't you? 
So now I study night and day 
And raise my spirits in this way. 
I think that life is now quite gay. 

Don't you? 

— Ruth Muirhead. 

I ITTTTTn > 

Sarita, looking for rotifera under the microscope in biology 
lab, cries out in excitement, "O, Miss Whitmer, I see one! I see 
a Rotarian!" 

Elly Dowd — "I heard he was dreadfully soft." 
Christine Cotner — "I shouldn't be surprised. He's awfully 
fat." 

The elephant's a crazy beast 

He's anything but clever 
He never needs a stitch of clothes 

But packs his trunk forever. — Ex. 

D. V. makes a motion that we award a gallon of blood and 
sand to the inspired Junior who, in reading "Two Gentlemen 
of Verona," called Valentine, one of the characters, Valentino. 

A weiner — A hamburger in tights. 

46 



Z5t)e College (Breetings 






PARSONAGE SKETCHES 
Lena Bennett 

Friday evening, no lessons, and a book. I had just settled 
myself comfortably before the fire, when the door was opened 
and in walked Mrs. Hamlin. 

"No — No — dear — don't get up. I just stepped in to see 
your mother about the Ladies Aid meeting." 

As usual, she had just stepped in without ringing the bell. 

"What, reading again? You will ruin your eyes, and — Oh, 
does your father know you have that book? Girls of sixteen 
should be reading "The Elsie Series" and not works of Hardy 
or Kipling. I suppose your father hasn't time to select your 
books, but I should be glad to help you. I have several suit- 
able for a girl of your age. No thank you. I don't care for 
candy, especially chocolates. Seems to me I told your mother 
that chocolates would ruin your complexion and health. It 
would not hurt you to be a little slender any way. You come 
over tomorrow and I will let you have "In His Steps", and "Pil- 
grim's Progress". Yes, I know your father has "Pilgrim's Pro- 
gress", but I have underlined my copy and that helps so much. 

I will pick out some Why, good evening, Mrs. Bennett. I 

was just suggesting some books for your daughter to read. Have 
you the material for the quilt? We must see about the cotton, 
and take ." 

A fire in the grate was pleasant, but my room appealed to 
me more. 

< mum > 

That door bell again, and my hair is all up in curls! It 
seems to me that curlers and doorbells always come at the same 
time. 

I go down stairs wondering who is to admire my disfigured 
head this time. The Sunday School Superintendent was the 
last lucky one. Perhaps this is Mrs. Lane after the spoons for 
the coffee they are serving this afternoon — you know they are 
raising money to repair the church. Or is it Mr. Hendrix? He 
always leaves his hat in the church Sunday evening, and then 

47 



X5h<t <£olUge <&tq.<i tings 



comes to borrow our key Monday morning. He hasn't been here 
yet. 

But my guesses are wrong. This young gentleman isn't 
after the church key surely, nor can he need the spoons. I do not 
know him, but I do know why he is ringing our bell. Such in- 
tuition comes with living in a parsonage. 

"Good morning!" 

"Good morning. Does Rev. Bennett live here?" 

"Yes, but he isn't in just now. Will you leave a message?" 

"Yes — er — will he be here by three this afternoon?" 

(By three o'clock! That tells me they are leaving on the 
four fifteen train) . 

"Yes, he will be here." 

"Very well then — we will be, or I mean, — I will be here to 
see him at three-thirty." 

"Good day." 

I take the steps three at a time. This looks like a ten, and 
Dad has promised me the next fee. 

i >TTTTTT< > 

REFRESH YOUR MEMORIES AS TO THESE 
CLASS OFFICERS 

SENIOR — President, Eloise Calhoun; Vice-president, 
Ruth Webb; Secretary, Harriet Hall; Treasurer, Helena Betcher; 
Adviser, Miss Neville. 

JUNIOR — President, Esther Purl; Vice-president, Luro 
Anderson; Secretary, Carrie Dyarman; Treasurer, Mary Lois 
Clark; Adviser, Miss Whitmer. 

SOPHOMORE — President, Ethel Morris; Vice-president, 
Harriet McOmber; Secretary, Belle Irelan; Treasurer, Zola De- 
Haven; Adviser, Miss Anderson. 

FRESHMAN — Chairman, Dorothy Randle; Adviser, Miss 
Powell. ( HIUHL- Z3 

A freshman from the Amazon 
Put nighties of her Gramazon. 

The reason's that 

She is too fat 
To get her own Pajamaron. — Whiz Bang. 
48 



Obc College (BreeUncjs 



Qee, but Freshmen are intricate! 
Decalling our early day we 
fTncounter great difficulties. 
Fach class grows stronger as we advance, 
Toward cap and gown. How 
Indugent the authorities grow each year! 
Mothing restrictive is added and much is taken away which 
Qives undue feelings of superiority. 
§uch ain't becoming, you know. — 2 from '23. 

i >TTTTTT1 > 

Miss Wakely — "In looking back on my college days I don't 
see how I ever survived College Algebra." 

Alma Blodget (in all good faith) — Some of us wonder that 
too, Miss Wakeley. 

t ITTTTTH ) 

The autumn leaves are falling, 
Are falling everywhere; 
They are falling thru the atmosphere 
And likewise, thru the air. — Whiz Bang. 
1 imrnt > 

DID IT MAKE YOU FEEL LIKE THIS? 
Tomorrow is my twenty-first birthday, and I feel it. Yes, 
I feel as if I would be able to go forth and conquer the world 
now. There will be nothing that I will not know. I shall 
know all science, all literature, all art. I shall be able to sit 
down and write more beautifully than any one else, and as for 
composing verses, there will be no one I cannot excel. All magic 
shall be as an open book to me. Anyone who ever tasted my 
cooking will die of hunger afterwards unless able to continue to 
be nourished by food cooked by myself. My embroidery will be 
so exquisite that it will dazzle the eyes. I shall be master of 
all languages and whoever hears me play upon any instrument 
whatsoever will be unable to refuse me anything I desire. I 
shall win the national championship in all sports, both land and 
water. And I shall have all men at MY feet. — Selah! 

49 



THE 
AYERS NATIONAL BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. F. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 




DIRECTORS 

ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-President H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

H. C. CLEMENT, Asst. Cashier W. G. GOEBEL, Asst. Cashier 



Member of Federal Reserve Bank 



The Store for 

DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

HOSIERY, GLOVES, CORSETS 

NOTIONS 



RkDJOHNS&lMlD'fc 



The Dunlap 

(EUROPEAN) 

A HOTEL THAT APPEALS TO WOMEN 
John M. Rule, Manager 



CAFE CONFECTIONERY 

I peacock Jinn 



For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Our Fountain 

CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELER'S FANS 

I JA CKSONVILLE Ry. & LIGHT CO 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
T. A. Chapin, Vice-President J' g' FaS 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j[ s." Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

GILBERTS DRUG STORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN- 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 



Mollenbrok fe? McCullough 



Vicker^'s 
♦♦♦Colonial 3mt*.* 

The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Recep- 
tions and Luncheons 

We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any quan- 
tity. We also serve dinners,when reservation is made in 
advance. 

. 1213 WEST STATE STREET 
Illinois Telephone 93 Bell Telephone 67 




Andre & Andre 

Everything 

to completely furnish 

the home 

Wallace-Nutting Pictures 

Quality, Service, Satisfaction 

The Best Place to Trade, after all. 



Miss Davis (at table) — Why don't you talk? 
Hazel I. — Is — Is it my turn? 



Smith Federal 
Bakery 



Cleanliness 
is your buy word 

Quality 

is our watch-word 



F. J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
popular fancies of Late Fashion, always featuring the 
youthful lines so becoming, displayed daily in our Ready- 
to-Wear Section. 

Dresses Coats Suits Skirts Furs 
Negligees Silk Underwear Blouses Lingerie 

F. J. Waddell & Company 



VOU will be pleased with our fine line of 
Jewelry and Silverwear 

Gifts That Please . . . 

RUSSELL & THOMPSON 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BURTON 






Flash Lights 




and 


The Home of Better 


Batteries 


Shoe Repairing 


PETERSON BROS. 




320 E. State St. 


223 WEST MORGAN STREET 





"The Home of Crispette" 

The Sanitary 

Pop-corn and 
Crispette Shop 

Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Loop Cafeteria ana 
Care 

POPULAR PRICES 



WEST MORGAN STREET 



Thursday night — 

Mary Lois — What shall we do tonight? 

Audrey — Let's flip a coin, if it's heads we go to the movies, 
tails we go visit Avis and Freddie, if it stands on edge we'll study. 

COME TO— 

FLORETHS 

For Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coats 

Say Girls 

Why not make that X-mas money 

NOW? 

Sell refined specialties to the home and club. Full or 
spare time. Write BERNICE E. RAYMOUR 

3706 Grand Blvd. Chicago, Illinois 



Jos. Burgert 

Dealer in 

Good Shoes 



No. 26 

North Side of Square 



DORWARTS 

Cask Market 

CHOICE MEATS 

OF ALL KINDS 

Both Phones 196 

No. 230 WEST STATE STREET 



Cully Coffee Company 
The Home of Good Coffee 



PHONE 268 



222 WEST STATE ST. 



Everything in Dry Goods and 
Millinery 



A 

iood Place 
To 
Trade 



FLORBTH'S GMd T r ,ace 

Trade 



Weit Side Dry Goods Co. 



iVidmayer's High Grade Meats, Etc. 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 

W. F. Widmaycr C. E. Segncr 



Cosgriff's Coffee and Waffle 

Shop 



FAMOUS 

Dpposite Court House 



WAFFLES 

West State Street 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



rhe Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the E our 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARE 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle 
West, in a beautiful, dignified, old college town, noted 
for its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are looking 
for a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS 
n n n n 



BAKERIES 

Ideal Baking Co. 
Smith Federal Bakery 

BANKS 

Ayers National Bank 
Farrell State Bank 

BOOK STORES— OFFICE SUP'S 

Lane's 

W. B. Rogers 

Book and Novelty Shop 

Ye Booke Shoppe 

CLOTHING STORES 

Frank Byrns' Hat Store 
Myers' Bros. 
Tom Duffner 
Tomlinson 

CONFECTIONERS 

W. S. Ehnie & Bro. 
Bonansinga 
Princess Candy Co. 
Peacock Inn 
Crispette Shop 
Mullenix & Hamilton 
Merrigan 

DOCTORS 

Dr. W. 0. Wait 

DRUG STORES 

Armstorog Drug Stores 
Coover Drug Co. 
Gilbert's Drug Stores 

DRY GOODS. READY-TO-WEAR 

C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Floreth's (East Side) 

Floreth's (West Side) 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Co. 

Rabjohn & Reid 

Shanken's 

F. J. Waddell 

DYEING AND CLEANING 

A. E. Schoedsack 
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 

Jacksonville Ry and Light Co. 
Walsh Electric Co. 
Peterson Bros. 

FLORISTS 

Harry Hofmann 
Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FURNITURE STORES 

Peoples' Furniture Co. 
Andre & Andre 



GROCERS 

Economy Cash Market 

Leek's 

Jenkinson-Bode, Wholesale 

Piggly Wiggly 

J. H. Zell 

Vasconcellos 

Cully Coffee Co. 

HARDWARE STORES 

Brady Bros. 
HOTELS 

New Pacific Hotel 
The Dunlap 

JEWELERS 

Bassetts 

Schram & Buhrman 

Russell & Thompson 

MEAT MARKETS 

Wiegand 

Widmjayer 

Dorwart's Cash Market 

MILLINERY 

H. J. Smith 
Miller Hat Shop 

MUSIC HOUSES 

J. Bart Johnson 
J. P. Brown 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Spieth's Studio 
Mollenbrok & McCullough 

PRINTING 

Courier Company 

Roach Press (East State St) 

Artcraft Printing Office 

RESTAURANTS 

Vickery's Colonial Inn 
Cafe Batz 
Loop Cafeteria 

SECOND HAND STORES 

Easley Second Hand Store 

SHOE SHOP AND REPAIRS 

L. L. Burton 
Jos Burgert 
Hopper & Son 
Mathis, Kamm & Shibe 
Jas. Mc Ginnis 
Edwin Smart Shoe Co. 

THEATERS 

Luttrell's Majestic Theater 

Scotts' 

Rialto 



Box of Fine Stationery 

Hammermill Bond 

250 Sheets of Paper and 250 Envelopes $2.2 

Roach Printing Office 

Opposite Post Office 



When we do our Christmas shopping 
For our mothers and our dads 
Ideas will just come a-popping 
If we study the ''Greetings" ads. 



BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN 


Malll!? 


Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 


Exclusive Agents 
Hartman Wardrobe 1 run 
Complete Line Hand Bag 

Mannish 


45-47 South Side Square 


Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ez 

The Book and Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETIN( 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVIL 



I still believe in and sell "QUALITY" foe 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 




Spietl) Studio 

Photography In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 
Portraiture 
S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shihe, say: 

"Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 



No trouble to show goods. 



54 North Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready-to-Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



The j 

Artcraxt Printing 
Office 



213 WEST MORGAN ST 

Telephone 400 

EMIL HARWE\ 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORKS 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone S8S—Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 

Everything Musical I 

49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 

GROCERY 

A good place to get good things 

to eat at a reasonable 

price 

EAST STATE STREET 



AT YOUR SERVICE 

FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 

YOUR FILMS TO US 

The Armstrong 

Drug Store* 

QUALITY STORES 

S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State St 
Jacksonville, 111. 



Shanke rfs 

Woman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
store will give you a better 
idea as to what is new. 



W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 

322-324 East State Street 



^e ^&ooKe 5l)0»»e 



SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



TFine Stationer? 
anb 

(Sift Shop Novelties 



J. P. BROWN 

Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 



TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 



19 South Side Square 

Jacksonville 



HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 



CORSAGES, CUT FLOTVERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



H. J. SMITH 

MILLINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 
LADIES' HOSIERY 

South Side Square 



\X7* -. 4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

W ant TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 

FLOWERS FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IX 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

Telephone 59 229 E. State St. 




%) Always 



________ , FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

SSmX^O s. A d S e T FOR BRUSHES AND 

UKUb uu - FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT- 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




e tiyj(-€kier 



Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 

OF FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 



We Repair 
Shoes 



HOPPERS 



We shine 
Shoes 



On the Corner 



For Those Who Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies' Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFNER 

// it's New — We Have It 



10 WEST SIDE SQ. 



EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 






Woman's College girls can always find a complete 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Totnlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

BVEHYTHING IN 

DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

EAST STATE STREET 



Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 

Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH 

Made Clean Sold Clean 

EAT 

MORE 

BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us supply the eats tor your next reed 



^ I) e (College (Greetings 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

Night Poems 50 

Proof — A Christmas Story 5 1 

The Expectations of a Basket-Ball 55 

Grades 56 

Poems 58 

A. A. U. W., an Explanation 59 

The Less Serious 63 

I. W. C. in 2000 A. D. 64 

What the College Needs 67 

A Christmas Letter 68 

"This Freedom", Criticism 69 

More of the Less Serious 70 



75\)<i (To I lege <B reelings 



NIGHT POEMS. 
By Audrey King, '24 

I am an alchemist. 

The moon is my slave. 
She is silver or gold 

As my fancy chooses. 
When I am gay she gleams yellow with gold. 
When I brood, she is pale, of white silver. 
The moon is my slave, 

Yet am I a kind master: 
The moon is ever beautiful. 



Dunne 



The Moon And The Mist 

The moon is a cold, pale moon. 

She lies in the sky, like a tragic pale woman. 

The moon is the mother of mists. 

From her do they get their white grayness ; 

From her do they inherit their weirdness: 

Like her are they cold, wan, and stifled. 

The moon has bewitched the wind. 

He lies bound by her spell and his breathing has 
ceased. 

Now the mists creep fearfully from the fens 
Where he has beat them. 

They approach her as curling monsters a sorceress, 
And the pale, cruel moon loves the mists. 



50 



Or>£ (TolUgfc (Breetings 



Night Mist 

I am at the edge of the world. 
Beyond that farthest tree, 
So dim is mist I only sense its being, 
Begins Infinity. 

Infinity is grey — 

A grey impenetrable to human eye, 
Infinity is a sea, heavily calm, 
Sluggish with the burden of the souls 
Which slumber there. 



Dimnc 



PROOF 

The advertising sign did bring a story, — an unsigned one, but 
charming. 

There was plenty of snow that Christmas eve, heaped white 
and billowy over everything. It had started early in the after- 
noon, pelting down thickly — the first snow of the season — and 
all the thoughts of Christmas seemed to be crystalized and pre- 
cipitating furiously with it. Holly covered with snow gained 
an elusive enchantment, persons powdered with it turned clowns 
and scooped through the inch-deep whiteness of it gaily. "Merry 
Christmas!" with a new ring now the snow had come. 

The same zestful spirit caught Bob of nine years, Buddy, 
seven, and Freddy, four, to such an extent that they came in for 
supper looking like little fat snow men; Bob and Buddy as a re- 
sult of a snow ball fight, Freddy because of "making angels." 
Supper was rather a boisterous meal, with many a wild specu- 
lation as to what Santa would bring, how he would come and 
the hundred other things which small boys can ask about that 
one important Christmas figure. 

51 






"<5l)£ College i&reettngs 



Manda, colored general maid, knew the danger signal in 
such rapid chatter and such bright eyes. "Ah reckon it would be 
a good thing to let Bob and Buddy play on the front po'ch foh 
a li'l while," she advised, and Mrs. Burr with a hundred things 
yet to do before Christmas day, consented. 

A half hour on the front porch had made parts of it shiny 
as glass and terrifyingly slippery. Bob and Buddy, having their 
fill of sliding, now were "gathering diamonds" which consisted 
in scooping up great handfuls of snow from spots where it glit- 
tered in the light from the windows, and stuffing it into little 
pockets (where later on it would melt). 

"Do you think there really is a Santa Claus?" asked Bob 
suddenly in the midst of this game. 

"Why — " was all Buddy could answer, neglecting his 
diamonds completely — and then Mother opened the door to call 
them in. 

Half an hour later three funny little figures in pajamas- 
with-feet bundled into bed solemnly promising to go right to 
sleep. The door closed and immediately conversation started 
softly. 

"What did you mean when you said that — you know — 
that on the porch?" asked Buddy, trying to keep the question 
above the head of Freddy sitting bolt upright in his little bed. 

"You'd see," answered Bob darkly, "you'd see if you'd 
stay awake tonight. There isn't any!" 

"There is too!" Buddy was really defiant. "I'm going to 
stay awake and see if there isn't." 

"F'eddy stay 'wake too an' see," came an eager little voice 
from the other side of the room. 

"I'll tell you what!" Bob exclaimed with some excitement, 
"we'll all stay awake. We'll tell stories, Freddy first an' then 
you, Bud, an' then me." 

"Awight," Freddy answered cheerfully, always glad to be 
included no matter what the penalty. Immediately his crooning 
story-telling voice began. 

52 



Z5l)e Collage (Breetlngs 



"Once upon a time a long, long time ago" (Freddy always 
began his stories in this manner) "there was an awfully bad li'l 
boy. An' so a dwagon ate him up. An' the dwagon's insides were 
made of fiah, so the li'l boy didn't like it one bit. No sah he did- 
'nt" (here Freddy copied 'Manda's best style) "an' so he just 
jumped around in the old dwagon's insides an' " — 

"Listen!" said Bud suddenly. Sleigh bells sounded and 
drew nearer — passed — faded away, while three little boys listen- 
ed intently. 

"An' so," went on Freddy. 

"Your story's no good," interrupted Bob severely. "I'll tell 
one. 

Freddy lay back placidly; he hadn't wanted to tell any 
story in the first place. 

"Once there was a train," began Bob with great directness, 
"that was big enough for boys to get in and run, and it didn't 
haf to have any tracks, so you could run it right on the side- 
walks. It had a engine with real fire and you could put real 
coal in an' everything, an' you could run it. An' it had real 
chairs inside that you could sit on with velvet seats. You could 
have a engineer an' you could take up tickets." 

"Freddy's asleep," interrupted Buddy disgustedly, and, 
tribute to Bob's superior gift of narration, Freddy was asleep. 

"Good," said Bob. "He's too little to go down stairs any- 
how. Let's go down now — it must be awfully late." 

"It must be awfully late," agreed Buddy with a thrill and 
the two slid quietly out of bed. 

Silence and a long black stair, — the last step and a light 
showing under the portieres. A mysterous sound of rustling 
paper and subdued voices. Slowly, holding their breaths, Bob 
and Buddy peeped in. Mother and 'Manda unwrapping pack- 
ages, and no one else. 

"See, I told you!" said Bob, "I told you!" 

Buddy didn't answer, — just stood there looking, peering 
in anxiously. 

53 



T5ht College (Breetlngs 



Neither of them had seen Freddy's slow struggle down the 
stairs one step at a time, nor heard his little panting breaths, yet 
here he was suddenly, his round little eyes wide on the scene be- 
fore him. 

"Whe's Santa?" he asked in a loud husky whisper. 

Bud immediately clapped a hand over the inquiring little 
mouth and horror stricken he and Bob looked in to see whether 
they might be discovered. All within the room was quiet as 
ever, excepting that 'Manda now began to speak. 

" 'Pears to me Santa would be back soon," she said. "He 
went upstairs to see if the children was asleep. Good thing they 
is," she chuckled, "or ah reckon he'd come right back an' take 
all these here presents an' things here all 'way. Yes sah he 
would. Reckon if they was out of bed the best thing would be 
for them to git right back in foh Santa finds it out." 

The three little culprits stole back in haste lest Santa should 
discover them. There was no more talking. Bob and Buddy fol- 
lowed each his own interpretation of the scene downstairs. 
Freddy hadn't any thoughts and sleep came soon to all three. 

"Wake up, it's Christmas," called Freddy. "I's been down- 
stairs an' they's a Christmas tree an — " 

But Bob and Buddy were halfway down, sniffing oranges 
and pine-tree, — the fragrance of the season. It had been their 
plan to wake their parents with a song, 'Manda had thought of 
that, — but in their excitement they forgot it. The glittering 
tree with its wonderful burdens absorbed all their attention for 
a few minutes. Too tense they were for even a sound. 

"Ha!" said Buddy suddenly, his eyes shining. He had 
been puzzled over a slip of paper for some minutes. 

"What?" asked Bob, and then still carrying his skates 
walked over to read the slip of paper attached to Buddy's gun. 
Slowly he made it out: "You got out of bed last night. Santa." 

"That proves it!" cried Buddy triumphantly. 

"Proves what?" asked father, just coming in with mother. 

"That Santa is a kind man," answered Bob slowly. 



54 



Ofye College (Brectings 



"Oh, wc fo'got our song!" cried Freddy at the sight of his 
parents. 

"Well, sing it now, then," laughed Dad. "What was it?" 
"Oh Christmas twee," said Freddy with great seriousness. 
And so they all did sing it, with Freddy screwing up his 
face over all the hard words. 

."Oh Christmas twee, 
Oh Christmas twee, 
How faif-fu are thy bwanches" 

l >TTTTTf< > 

THE EXPECTATIONS OF A BASKET-BALL. 

The hockey stick leaned disconsolately against the wall of 
the athletic store room. He was cracked, his varnish was gone, 
and he sighed. "Now for a good winter's rest, and next year who 
knows, perhaps I may again send the ball thru the goal in a de- 
ciding score" 

The big fat basket-ball smiled so broadly that he nearly 
burst a seam. "My time is just coming," he said. A few more 
days and hundreds of anxious eyes will follow my path down 
the floor. It's such fun to tease them, — to run around the rim 
of the basket and make them think I'm going to fall outside in- 
stead of in. And the best thing about it is, that whichever way 
I do fall I'm sure of approval from at least half of the specta- 
tors." 

"When my manufacturer shipped me off to a Woman's Col- 
lege instead of a university, I was 'just killed.' But no freshman 
boy straight from loading wheat could whack me harder than 
some of these frail sisters when they get the spirit of combat. And 
all of the sisters are not frail, either. Sometimes when they fall 
on me I'm nearly done for. But anyway" (and he almost bounc- 
ed in expectation), "anyway, its glorious." 

"Don't talk so much," growled the base-ball bat, blinking 
a sleepy eye. "I'm not due 'til spring and if I don't get some 
rest I won't be able to make one girl tear her hair net fishing the 
ball out from under the south hedge." 

55 






©l>e College ©reelings 



Vol. XXVI. Jacksonville, III., Dec, 1922 No. 3 

STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 

Associate Editor Eloise Calhoun 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 



ARE GRADES TOO HIGH AT I. W. C.?— NO! 

Was it a Senior who had been making A's from very hard 
work throughout her years of toil, or was it a Senior who by lit- 
tle work and some bluffing had made A's, who said in last 
month's Greetings that grades were too high at I. W. C.? 

No matter in which class of the two she belongs, the grades 
of I. W. C. are not too high! 

One reason for this bold statement comes as a result of the 
number of girls who were ineligible for society this fall from the 
present Sophomore class. Eligibility requires a general average 
of 80. Out of the entire class one-fourth were ineligible. Was 
this the fault of the grading!' No ! 

Grades at I. W. C. averaging from 85% to 100% are very 
difficult to obtain. When a grade is made honestly by hard 
work, whether it is high or low it is one to be proud of, and per- 
sonally we believe that there are very few A's given without hard 
work and individual thinking. 

When we spend a little thought and time in looking over 
the Honor List of last year we see that the majority of the names 
are those who are the steady, dependable girls of I. W. C., the 
ones who really study for what they have obtained. 

Then why should we object to such a large Honor List if it 
stands for what it is named? — A Couple of Juniors. 

56 



Ol?e College (Greetings 



DO GRADES MEAN ANYTHING? 

Take your mid-term report. Rid yourself of prejudice and 
think it over. Your musings will be something like this: 

"That A, — ridiculous! This A, — I earned that. That B, — 
should have been B plus. The things that class have given me 
aren't the things that show up. That C, — deserved." 

The honest student evaluates her work according to her 
own standard of value and her own knowledge of the amount 
of work done, and respects or fails to respect her grades accord- 
ingly. 

( >tttttt< > 

CONCERNING GRADES 

The article in last month's "Greetings" stating that the 
grades given in our College are far too high for the work done 
by the pupils has been causing a great deal of comment. Many 
students who have been doing honest and conscientious work re- 
sent even the suggestion that we as a student body are "pulling" 
our grades. 

Of course we do not expect to be classed as the "choicest of 
the choice students", but we do contend that we are average 
students, studying under conditions a little better than the av- 
erage. The majority of the students live in the dormitory. This 
close connection with our Library and Classroom should be a 
great aid to careful study. Because of the size of our school most 
of the classes are comparatively small, affording excellent op- 
portunity for the members of the faculty to know the individual 
abilities of each student and make a fair judgment of her work. 

In proof of the amount of work required from the students 
one might list the number of times girls are too busy to work 
on a committee, to attend a meeting or to get a little fresh air. 
Of course not all "light pers" are used for study, but practically 
every privilege is taken advantage of; and, we know absolutely 
that girls are getting up at five or five-thirty morning after morn- 
ing to put more time on their lessons. 

57 



X5[)t College (Greetings 



It seems impossible that girls, coming to College (as many 
of us do) through the sacrifice and careful planning of our par- 
ents should prove unworthy of the best grades it is their ability 
to obtain. B's, B pluses, and even A's surely are not out of the 
reach of any serious minded, conscientious College student whose 
primary aim is to receive a thorough education, and I insist that 
we do "exercise our minds in obtaining them". — Another Senior. 



jmmc 



The sun is a great ball of fire, 

Of flaming orange fire 

In somber sky; 

A glorious, passionate sphere 

That drops slowly behind the grey horizin 

Veinly trying to arouse 

A cold and busy world 

With its splendor and vivid glory. 

— Dorothy Dieman. 

The Train 

A sudden whistle penetrates the murky night, 

And spreads like ripples in a placid pond! 

Now in the stillness I can hear 

The somber, steady onrush of some train: , 

A clanging, firey monster in the dark; 

Yet with the thrill of mystery, it bears 

Countless people on and on 

In lighted coaches thru the countryside. 

— Dorothy Dieman, '25 



58 



Ohe College (Greetings 



A. A. U. W. 

Former student, present student of the Illinois Woman's 
College, — see if you fit in any one of the three classes of members 
in this article. If so you are eligible or will be eligible to the 
A. A. U. W., which Miss Austin here explains. 

The American Association of University Women is an old 
organization under a new name. 

About forty years ago a group of women representing half 
a dozen colleges of high academic standing, met in Boston and 
formed an organization which they called The Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae. It's purpose as stated then, was to"unite the 
alumnae of different institutions for practical educational work, 
for the collection and publication of statistics, and other infor- 
mation concerning education, and, in general, for the mainten- 
ance of high standards of education." 

Some of the more important lines of work carried on by 
this association have been educational legislation, help for for- 
eign students, vocational guidance for college graduates, the 
award of fellowships for graduate study in American and Europ- 
ean Universities, and the stimulation of scientific research among 
women. Much important legislation has been secured. Foreign 
students have been aided in getting the best in the educational op- 
portunities of this country and in becoming acquainted with the 
most significant phases of American life. It was largely through 
the influence and help of this organization that the Intercollegiate 
Bureau of Occupation was formed. 

Very soon other colleges and universities sought admission 
to this association. A special committe was appointed on the 
Recognition of Colleges and Universities. It has since been the 
duty of this committee to examine the standards of the colleges 
seeking admission and to pass upon the eligibility to member- 
ship. 

The Association has used as its standard for academic rat- 
ing the list of colleges recommended by the Association of 

59 



Orje College (Breetln^s 



American Universities to foreign universities. This list contains 
not only those institutions on the accepted list of the Carnegie 
Foundation, but also those which are certified as of equivalent 
standing but excluded for other than educational reasons. 

Additional requirements for admission include a "reason- 
able recognition of women in the faculty and in the student 
body" of coeducational institutions; women on the Board of 
Trustees; a dean, or adviser of women, who is counted a regular 
member of the faculty; and adequate provision through halls of 
residence, or other buildings, for the social life of women stu- 
dents. 

Because of the exclusiveness of the Association of Collegiate 
Alumnae, the Southern colleges organized into a separate asso- 
ciation known as The Southern Association of College Women. 
Its standards were much the same and the existence of two such 
organizations seemed unnecessary. In the spring of 1921 these 
associations agreed to unite, but under a new name, The Asso- 
ciation of American University Women. The chief reason for 
the change of name was the fact that the old name had been 
greatly misunderstood by the European members of the Inter- 
national Federation of University Women, the term Collegiate 
being interpreted by them as denoting an institution of second- 
ary rank. The new name corresponds to that used by similar 
organizations in other countries. 

Through the persistent efforts of President Harker, Illinois 
Woman's College was put on the accredited list of the Associa- 
tion at the annual meeting in April, 1921. Our alumnae are 
now eligible to membership in any Branch of the Association 
convenient to their place of residence. 

There may be three classes of members in any Branch Asso- 
ciation :- 

First, National Members — those who hold a degree from a 
college on the eligible list of the National Association, includ- 
ing those who received their degree before the date of admission 
of the college to the Association. 

60 



*€>!)£ College (Breetings 



Second, Local Members — women who hold approved de- 
grees from any college or university not on the accredited list, but, 
recognized by the sectional committee of the Association. 

Third, Associate Members — women, not eligible to nation- 
al or local membership, who have had one full year of academic 
work in any college or university on the accredited list either of 
the national association or of the sections, and who are invited 
to become associate members in a Branch. This does not in- 
clude undergraduate students. Academic work is interpreted to 
mean such as would be accredited for one full year's work lead- 
ing toward the B. A. degree, although not necessarily taken for 
that degree. 

The Jacksonville Branch of the Association of American 
University Women was organized last year and admitted to the 
National Association at the annual meeting in April. Its list 
of national members now numbers more than eighty degree 
graduates of recognized institutions. It has also a growing list 
of local and associate members. Although organized less than 
a year ago, it has already proved itself of distinct educational and 
cultural value to the community. 

It is our hope that all alumnae of Illinois Woman's College 
on the eligible list in any one of the three classes of members, 
will avail themselves of the privilege of becoming a member of 
this great organization of college women, and will seek mem- 
bership in the nearest Branch Association. It affords an excellent 
opportunity for service in the cause of education, as well as for 
congenial association with other women of culture and high 
ideals. — Olive L. Austin. 

I >TTTTTTI > 



Soph; (at table) "She never asks in exam for the points 
you'd expect." 

Miss Johnston: "Then why don't you skip those points 
in studying?" 

Soph: "I did. She asked them." 

61 



T3l)<i (Tollege (Brewings 




Dec. 21, 1922 

"Will you please tell Ethel Morris that she has a phone call?" 
"O Boy! This is she. I'll be right down!" 

Blithely she tripped down the stairs. On the precious little slip 

was a number. It was a perfectly unknown number. Thrills! 

Shivers!! 

"Hello !Does someone there wish to speak to Ethel Morris?" 

(In her most dulcet tones.) 

"Yes, Miss Morris, This is the Public Library. You have a 

book three days over-due. Please return it, with the fine, as soon 

as possible." 

I tTTTTTT< \ 

"Joe, don't risk a fall out of the window while you're play- 
ing that uke. Remember, it belongs to your room-mate." 

C 



Dnnnc 



D 



"A third floor Sherlock believes she has discovered who was 
deliberately jumping up and down during quiet hour. It was 
a dishonorable steam pipe. 

62 



C?l?e College (Breetings 



DON'T BE WHAT YOU AIN'T 
By Martha Mayo, '26 

Don't be what you ain't, 

Just be what you is, 
For if you is not what you am 

Then you am not what you is. 

If you're just a little Senior, 
Don't try to be the school. 

If you're just a little Freshman, 
Don't try to act the fool. 

If you're just a Sophomore, 
Don't try to be the town, 
If you're just a little Junior, 
They'll surely take you down. 

Don't be what you ain't, 

Just be what you is. 
For the guy that plays it square, 

Is going to get what's his. 



Pimm > 



I hate with a righteous hatred: 

The soap that slides gaily under the bath tub when I'm 
bathing. 

The seven o'clock bell. 

The girl who whispers during a recital number. 

Cold Toast. 

The girl who "heard just a dandy joke for Greetings, but 
just can't remember it to save her life." 

The over-zealous student who reminds the instructor that 
she's "already assigned that lesson." 

Washing stockings. 

But all of these are whipped cream compared to my love for 
the person who doesn't bring back my electric iron. 

63 



Z5t)t College Greetings 



I. W. C IN 2000 A. D. 

Last month you read an account of I. W. C. life in 1850 
and the Student Association stunt also portrayed the early days. 
A hundred and fifty years have elapsed between that time and 
the following. 

It was a fall morning in 2000 A. D. when our heroine 
awakened, or rather, was awakened by being gently but firmly 
deposited on the floor. The mattress, which had been tipped 
sideward, gradually replaced itself, and steel hooks made the bed 
by drawing the covers into place. The automatic rising machine 
controlled from the power-house, with attachment to every 
mattress in the building, was working perfectly, so that the 
hundreds of students arose, or rather, were raised, simultaneous- 

The windows were closed, so that the room was warm. 
Were they likewise controlled from a central source? O, no. Her 
roommate had awakened early, and had closed the windows 
while still in bed by mental suggestion. Mental science and the 
power of mind over matter had developed to a stage whereby 
one could pull down a stubborn window, but not for several 
centuries would it be strong enough to compel one to arise when 
sleepy. 

Our heroine stood in her night-dress and pushed a button in 
the wall, and instantly the automatic dressing machine came 
down from its attachment on the ceiling. It was a metal cabi- 
net, and after the customary argument with her room-mate as 
to who should use it first, she stepped in. Steel claws 
clothed her carefully with garments that she had placed 
in it the night before, and she emerged clad in the costume of 
the day — a short sleeveless jacket, short trousers, rolled hose, (a 
revival of a century old style) ,and hair in waves to her shoulders. 
But her face had a most peculiar appearance. Her cheeks 
were pale, her nose a deep and passionate red. "That dumb 
machine," she exclaimed looking in the mirror. "It has the 
rouge and the powder mixed again." 

64 



Ofye College (Breetlngs 



"Machine nothing !"declared her room-mate with the symp- 
athy and tact which was still characteristic of that species. "You 
put 'em in the wrong compartments yesterday, when you put in 
the fresh supply." 

When both were dressed they did not as was customary in 
days of yore, dash madly down the stairs and into the dining 
hall. They took from the shelf a black canister labelled 
"BREAKFAST, WEDNESDAYS", and each took therefrom 
a small pill. 

Our friend then withdrew to a corner of the room with pen 
and paper. (Pens at this time were non-leakable, and generated 
their own ink.) She had to write a poem for comp, 
and she wanted quiet, so that she could summon to her aid 
the spirit of Robert Burns. She would have preferred Shakes- 
peare, but the big and powerful universities had first option on 
the spirits of the greatest poets. Milton, for instance, responded 
only to the call of Yale. He would never have considered allow- 
ing his spirit to roam in a woman's college. But Bobby Burns 
just doted on it. The girls never found him hard to summon. 
Our students at the ringing of the bell stepped out of the door 
onto a narrow carpet spread along the hall. From every door 
issued others who stood in line on the carpet. The floor beneath 
then began to move. Thru the halls they passed without a mo- 
tion of their bodies, each one stepping off as she came to her re- 
spective class room. 

So we find our heroine seated on the front row of a history 
class, not in a harsh wooden chair, but on a pillow strewn divan. 
Educators had decided that class-rooms should be made livable. 

"Has anyone heard the radio this morning?" inquired the 
professor. "If so you were probably interested in the campaign 
that the opponents of the Harmful Drink Prohibitionists move- 
ment are putting on. Those of you who have studied ancient 
history will recall that when prohibition of alcoholic drinks was 
passed an attempt was made to legalize the sale of beer and light 
wines. Now the opponents of the Anti-Coffee act are trying to 

65 



Obe College (Breetings 



legalize the use of cocoa and green tea. We predict failure." 

"But they're having a hard time trying to enforce the Cof- 
fee Act," volunteered our heroine. (She did not know her 
lesson, and was trying to side-track the instructor.) "Yesterday 
federal agents confiscated three coffee-pots right here in Jack- 
sonville." 

"Is that so!" exclaimed the teacher. "But we must get to the 
lesson. The assignment today was the League of Worlds, and 
the reasons for its failure. Gladys, will you give us first the 
terms of the treaty that ended the War of Planets." 

From class the moving carpet took them to chapel. It was a 
college sing that morning. "For the first song," said the leader, 
"let's sing that old quaint folk-song called 'Stumblin.' You 
will think it crude, but it is appealing in its dumb simplicity, and 
some of the unpleasant parts of the tune can be explained by the 
fact that it belonged to that early Jazz period in musical history. 
So-called "jazz" music was used frequently at the old-fashioned 
dances of the time, when they danced in couples instead of 
yielding themselves individually to the music, as we do now." 

After chapel our heroine rushed to her room and turned on 
the radio. It was the time for news from home. Always some 
member of the family was at the home station to tell her that 
Aunt Mary was sick or that John had a new girl or that they 
just couldn't wait until she came home. Then she switched to 
another station and prepared herself to receive from Paris the 
radio translation of her French lesson. 

But she was interrupted by a fellow-student who stepped 
over her engaged sign as students have been doing since the year 
one and will continue to do until the doors are locked as well. 
"Have you heard the scandal?" whispered the intruder. "Lorene 
is is campused for going flying without a chaperone, and you 
know how she gets those rides. She simply PICKS THEM UP 
by sitting on the roof and flirting with the aviators!" 



A. B. Wise in American Lit: — "Miss Powell, didn't Homer 
translate the Iliad and the Odyssey?" 

66 



X3be College (Breedings 



WHAT THE COLLEGE NOW NEEDS. 

For additional endowment and equipment $500,000. To- 
ward this amount $261,000 has already been subscribed. 

These subscriptions have been made on condition that the 
balance — $239,000 is subscribed by June 30, 1923. 

WHO CAN HELP? 

As Dr. Harker has often said, "The Greatest Need of the 
College is Friends." It needs the present student body, former 
students, your parents, anyone whom you may be able to per- 
suade to help. 

HOW CAN YOU HELP? 

By pledging some gift, no matter how large or how small 
it may be. By persuading your friends to pledge. Let's make 
the present student body 100 per cent for endowment and a 
bigger college. 

Mildred E. Waldron, 

Endowment Chairman. 

I ITTTTTn > 

DEAR D. V.— 

Just read about the stingiest man on earth. He had a toy 
balloon vulcanized. 

MINK. 

( nTTTTT< 1 

TRIOLET. 

No more I'll waste my time away 

And try to bluff my courses thru : 

Mid-year exams begin today. 

No more I'll waste my time away. 

Again, remorseful, do I say, 

— Tho this resolve is far from new — 

No more I'll waste my time away 

And try to bluff my courses thru. 

67 



Z3lje College (Breetings 



Santiago, Chile, Nov., 1922 
Dear Sarita: 

It all seems a great big joke to think of you and a cold 
Christmas. You poor people up there! How can you have a real 
Christmas without a warm, golden sun, without lots of flowers 
and birds? 

Here, days are getting lovelier and warmer each day and 
we expect to have an ideal Christmas. Mother is making a lovely 
green organdie dress for me. You poor thinglAnd to think you'll 
have to wear a coat! 

The children are already much excited. They are all think- 
ing about the many varied things they would like to have and 
are wondering whether the child Jesus will approve of their 
choice. They all have figured out where they are going to hang 
their stockings and leave their shoes. 

While the children sleep and wait for the Child Jesus, we 
are planning on doing what the rest of the older folks do. We 
shall visit the churches, for the custom of representing the Child 
in the stable, etc. has not changed. 

Everybody seems to be busy preparing their presents, and 
the store windows are all beautifully decorated. 

We all wish you were here to enjoy our family reunion on 
that day, but we hope you will have a real Christmas, even if it 
is on an icy day. The spirit of Christmas is the same anyway 
whether you are in the torrid zones or in the arctic regions. 

We'll write you a long letter soon. This seems to be just a 
chat on Christmas, but that is all one hears everywhere, so I had 
to talk to you about it. 

With much love, 

Maria. 



online 



Mugs — "Billie, we need something for Greetings. Do 
you know any good jokes? 

Billie: (in a downcast mood.) "Yes. Me! 



68 



. 



Z3lje College (Greetings 



"THIS FREEDOM." 

Hutchinson's latest novel "This Freedom" deals with a 
question that is of great importance to many American women. 
Can a woman have a business career and still do her duty by her 
husband and children? 

In this novel an English girl marries with the understand- 
ing that in all things she will be equal with her husband, that 
there will be a "perfect equality". She makes a success in busi- 
ness but her three children all turn out badly while her husband 
feels deeply the lack of "home life". Then after she has seen the 
terrible failure of her children she tries to atone by giving up her 
career and caring for her grandchild. 

Mr. Hutchinson seems not to have definitely settled in his 
own mind the question of woman and her career. In the first 
section of the book he shows the unsuccessful and sordid life of 
the woman who stayed at home caring for her family, while in 
the second section he sets forth the failure of the business woman 
in her home life. 

Several competent critics have declared this book to be a 
great exaggeration of conditions, while others equally competent 
have called it pertinent criticism of woman's position in the 
world today. 

This book seems to me, an inexperienced critic, to be de- 
cidedly exaggerated. The results arising from conditions are 
too overwhelming. Because a talented woman who conducts 
her household with smoothness and success chooses to take up 
a business career she is condemned to suffer for it. In the post- 
cript the author deliberately smoothes over the calamities which 
he has brought upon the parents and declares — "They're all 
right now. Their little grandchild is looking after them." 

Whether or not the novel itself has any value, Mr. Hutch- 
inson has succeeded in bringing into still greater discussion the 
subject of woman and her career. — Eloise Calhoun. 

i rmrTTi > 

Hazel Moore says that she used to be thin, but that col- 
lege has made her a well-rounded girl. 

69 



Ol)e College <£ reelings 



Who is D. V.? Well, who has a joke for every occasion — 
and every person. Here are a few. D. V. doesn't remember 
where they came from, but thinks them very appropriate: 

Chaperone: "What do you mean by letting that young 
man kiss you? Part of the performance took place right under 
my nose." 

Kentucky: "Then what are you kicking about?" 

Miss Teague to Esther Purl: 

"Now, Esther, don't you think you had better turn the 
page? You have already translated the first ten lines on the 
next one." 

Wa Wa (a local celebrity) "I call my girl snap shot, be- 
cause eveywhere I go she has to be taken." 

B. P. O. E. (another) "Is that so? I call mine film be- 
cause she is so well developed." 

I >TTTTTT< > 

SOLILOQUY OF A FRESHMAN 

'Tis with tired and aching muscles, 
That I lay me down at night. 
Our gymnasium is so strenuous 
We can hardly stand aright. 
Lois is so spry and agile, 
But she's suffered through it all. 
She's now teaching us the "ox dance", 
And oft times we get a fall. 
Our class is large in number, 
And we sometimes are a sight 
When we all move incorrectly, 
Hardly knowing where we light. 
When upstairs our way we're wending 
Slowly climbing one by one 
The many steps before us, 
My, we're glad when day is done. 

L. S. —'26 
70 



T5k>z <£olUge (Greetings 



OUTSIDE THE ART STUDIO 



A girl was gazing at a picture, 
Completely 

In contemplation. 

O rare artist! Nothing less than 
Sacrilege 

Your meditation! 

In haste I drew back around the corner, 
But I could 

Only a short time. 

Slowly, then I went on to the studio. 
The girl stood 

The same great picture. 



Absorbed 



To disturb 



Stay there 



Before 



Startled, she turned from her thoughts of the picture. 
On hearing 

My slow 
Footsteps approaching. 
Then, turning back to the picture, 



Powdering 

In the reflection. 



She finished 
Her nose 



— A. F. 



Dnnnc 






Flo was limping down to dinner after the hockey game 
with the Juniors. "That Lucille Vick," she moaned, "played 
a regular jazz tune on my ankle." 

71 






THE 
AYERS NATIONAL BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. P. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 



J*/0ftk 


Ww^& 


iiiiitiif 


FB 


gfiiisiiii 


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, SmSp-E 


£ Slf. 


.iffisii 


6 Br 


l^o m [fKfl'IBl'El liflll 


■1 nSIiiV 




l'"l LjfiS 


''^^ShSmS 




>«*m 





DIRECTORS 

ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-Presi dent H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

H. C. CLEMENT, Asst. Cashier W. G. GOEBEL, Asst. Cashier 



Member of Federal Reserve Bank 



The Store for 

DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

HOSIERY, GLOVES, CORSETS 

NOTIONS 



R&djom&Deid'S 



The Dunlap 

(EUROPEAN) 

A HOTEL THAT APPEALS TO WOMEN 
John M. Rule, Manager 



;afe confectionery 

peacock 3nn 



• IIHINHIIIIHIIIIUMIIII i tlMHMlIMM 



For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Our Fountain 

'CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELER'S FANS 

! JACKSONVILLE Ry. & LIGHT CO. 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
| A Chapta, Vice-President £ A. Chapin 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j. s. Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 Weit State Street 

GILBERTS DRUG STORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN- 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 



Mollenbrok & McCullough 



Vlckery's 
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The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Recep- 
tions and Luncheons 

We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any quan- 
tity. We also serve dinners,when reservation is made in 
advance. 

. 1213 WEST STATE STREET 
Illinois Telephone 93 Bell Telephone 67 




Andre & Andre 

Everything 

to completely furnish 

the home 

Wallace-Nutting Pictures 

Quality, Service, Satisfaction 
The Best Place to Trade, after all. 



If you want a thing of good report 

Go to the men who the "Greetings" support. 



Smith Federal 
Bakery 



Cleanliness 
is your buy word 

Quality 

is our watch-word 



F. J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
popular fancies of Late Fashion, always featuring the 
youthful lines so becoming, displayed daily in our Ready- 
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Dresses Coats Suits Skirts Furs 
Negligees Silk Underwear Blouses Lingerie 

F. J. Waddell & Company 



VOU will be pleased with our fine line of 
Jewelry and. Silverwear 

Gifts That Please . . . 

I RUSSELL & THOMPSON 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BURTON 



The Home of Better 
Shoe Repairing 

223 WEST MORGAN STREET 



Flash Lights 

and 

Batteries 

PETERSON BROS. 

320 E. State St. 



"The Home of Crispette" 

The Sanitary 

Pop-corn and 
Crispette Shop 

Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Loop Cafeteria and 
Care 



POPULAR PRICES 



WEST MORGAN STREET 



Do you want a Pie? 
Do you want a Pen? 
Don't forget to buy 
From the Greetings men, 



COME TO— 

FLORETHS 

For Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coats 

Say Girls 
Why not make that X-mas money 
NOW? J 

Sell refined specialties to the home and club. Full or 
spare time. Write BERNICE E. RAYMOUR 

3706 Grand Blvd. Chicago, Illinois 



Jos. Burgert 

Dealer in 

Good Shoes 



No. 26 

Nortk Side of Square 



DORWARTS 

Cask Market 
CHOICE MEATS 

OF ALL KINDS 

Both Phones 196 

No. 230 WEST STATE STREET 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lane's Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 



It's Well Worth Considering 



Fancy Box Stationery 
Address Books 



Program Pencils 
Wahl Gold and Silver 
Eversharp Pencils 

313 w. state st. yy b Rogers 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS mt mM • *— 9% a ^ A ~- r ^^^— * i=3 



Use Brazola Coffee 

Sold by 

Jenkinson-Bode Co. 

Coffee Roasters and 

Wholesale Grocers 



Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
EVENING COURIER 

For Today's News 



FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
Catalogues, Pamphlets, Letter- 
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WOMAN'S FURS 

The styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

FRANK BYRNS HA sW 

Economy Grocery 

^tsSn^r" PURE FOODS 

Illnois Phone 49 



Cully Coffee Company 

The Home of Good Coffee 

PHONE 268 222 WEST STATE ST. 

Everything in Dry Goods and 
Millinery 

GoodVce pLORETH'S Goo (r ace 

Trade West Side Dry Goods Co. Trade 

Widmayer's High Grade Meats, Etc. 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 
W. F. Widmayer C. E. Segner 



If you want some knowledge 
Go to your faculty adviser 
If you want a purchase 
Go to a "Greetings" advertiser. 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



The Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the Hour 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARE 



THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORES 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 
74 S. SIDE SQ. 

\ Buckthorpe Brothers 

| Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 



Schram & Buhrman 
Jewelers 

BOTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



Wiegand 7V\ark:et 

224- E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 
Quality and Service our Motto 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGI 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle 
West, in a beautiful, dignified, old college town, noted 
for its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are looking 
for a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS 

n n n n 



BAKERIES 

Ideal Baking Co. 
Smith Federal Bakery 

BANKS 

Ayers National Bank 
Farrell State Bank 

BOOK STORES— OFFICE SUP'S 

Lane's 

W. B. Rogers 

Book and Novelty Shop 

Ye Booke Shoppe 

CLOTHING STORES 

Frank Byrns' Hat Store 
Myers' Bros. 
Tom Duffner 
Tomlinson 

CONFECTIONERS 

W. S. Ehnie & Bro. 
Bonansinga 
Princess Candy Co. 
Peacock Inn 
Crispette Shop 
Mullenix & Hamilton 
Merrigan 

DOCTORS 

Dr. W. 0. Wait 

DRUG STORES 

Armstorog Drug Stores 
Coover Drug Co. 
Gilbert's Drug Stores 

DRY GOODS. READY-TO-WEAR 

C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Floreth's (East Side) 

Floreth's (West Side) 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Co. 

Rab John & Reid 

Shanken's 

F. J. Waddell 

DYEING AND CLEANING 

A. E. Schoedsack 
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 

Jacksonville Ry and Light Co. 
Walsh Electric Co. 
Peterson Bros. 

FLORISTS 

Harry Hof mann 
Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FURNITURE STORES 

Peoples' Furniture Co. 
Andre & Andre 



GROCERS 

Economy Cash Market 

Leek's 

Jenkinson-Bode, Wholesale 

Piggly Wiggly 

J. H. Zell 

Vasconcellos 

Cully Coffee Co. 

HARDWARE STORES 

Brady Bros. 
HOTELS 

New Pacific Hotel 
The Dunlap 

JEWELERS 

Bassetts 

Schram & Buhrman 

Russell & Thompson 

MEAT MARKETS 

Wiegand 

Widmayer 

Dorwart's Cash Market 

MILLINERY 

H. J. Smith 
Miller Hat Shop 

MUSIC HOUSES 

J. Bart Johnson 
J. P. Brown 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Spieth's Studio 
Mollenbrok & McCullough 

PRINTING 

Courier Company 

Roach Press (East State St) 

Artcraft Printing Office 

RESTAURANTS 

Vickery's Colonial Inn 
Cafe Batz 
Loop Cafeteria 

SECOND HAND STORES 

Easley Second Hand Store 

SHOE SHOP AND REPAIRS 

L. L. Burton 
Jos Burgert 
Hopper & Son 
Mathis, Kamm & Shibe 
Jas. Mc Ginnis 
Edwin Smart Shoe Co. 

THEATERS 

Luttrell's Majestic Theater 

Scotts' 

Rialto 



Box of Fine Stationery I 

Hammermill Bond 

250 Sheets of Paper and 250 Envelopes $2.25 
Roach Printing Office 

Opposite Post Office 



BRADY BROS 

EVERYTHING IN 

Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 

45-47 South Side Square 



Exclusive Agents 
Hartman A^/ardrobe Trunks 
Complete Line Plana Baggag 

Mannish 
Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ezard 

The Book and Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETINGS 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILLE 

I still believe in and sell "QUALITY" foot- 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New/ Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 




Spietl) Stu6io 

Photography In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in Hign Grade 
Portraiture 
S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

"Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 North Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready-to-Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



Ike 

Artcraft Printing 

Office 



213 WEST MORGAN ST. 

Telephone 400 

EMIL HARWEY 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORKS 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388— Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 
Everything Musical I 

49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 


AT YOUR SERVICE 

FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 

YOUR FILMS TO US 


GROCERY 


±ne Armstrong 


A good place to get good things 

to eat at a reasonable 

price 


Drug Stores 

QUALITY STORES 

S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State St 


EAST STATE STREET 


Jacksonville, 111. 



Shanke rVs 

Woman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
store will give you a better 
idea as to what is new. 



W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 



322-324 East State Street 



$?e %ooke Sljoppe 



SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



3Fine Stationery 
and 
<Bift S\)op Novelties 



J. P. BROWN 

Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 



TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 



19 South Side Square 

Jacksonville 



HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 



CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



H. J. SMITH 

MILLINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 
LADIES' HOSIERY 

South Side Square 



\X7n *^ 4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

W cUll TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 

FLOWERS FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IN 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

Telephone 59 229 E. State St. 




^ Always — 



sns-n%#i=-» FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

S2i1Xt5% SK? FOR BRUSHES AND 

UKUb <■*"• FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 






ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT— 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 

OF FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

We Repair "U" ^^w Tr~> "*-> T7^ TH> 4^J We shine 
Shoes JlX KJ Jr IT JOJ K. CT Sfcoes 

On the Corner 

For Those Who Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN TV. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies* Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFNER 

// it's New— We Have It 10 WEST SIDE SQ. 

EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 



Woman's College girls can always find a complete 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Tomlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 



C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

EVERYTHING IN 

DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

EAST STATE STREET 



Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 

Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISHI 

Made Clean Sola Clean 

EAT 

MORE 

BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us supply the eats for your next feed 



© I) e College Greetings 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

Are Women People 72 

Ballade 74 

" 'Tis More Blessed to Give — " 74 

Warbling for Dollars 78 

A New Organization 79 

A Letter from Miriam 79 

More Recognition for Miss Knopf 82 

More Opportunity, Editorial 84 

Observations of Ophelia 86 

Pour Les Eleves de Francais et Espanol 88 

It's All in Her Daily Routine 89 

Privileges 9 1 

Jobs for the Seniors 92 

Snap-Shots of the West 92 

Sealed Bids 94 

My Tree 95 

"Candy, Mister?" 97 






X3rje <£olkge (Breetings 



ARE WOMEN PEOPLE? 

Arc women people? Well may anxious souls who take to 
heart the welfare of the race debate the question. Look back 
on the past. The negative will run up many points. The affirm- 
ative may secure notable individual cases, but the story of the 
past as a whole supports the other side. 

In Homer's time Trojan women ranked high as wives and 
mothers, but in the disposal of the spoils of war they were col- 
lected with the rest of the booty to be apportioned by lot among 
the victorious Greek warriors. The Greek women were no bet- 
ter off. Iphigenia was sacrificed by her royal father to secure 
favorable winds for the voyage to Troyland. Penelope, account- 
ed a widow because of the continued absence of Ulysses, was be- 
seiged by suitors and had to resort to stratagem to put them off. 
At no time did she question the fact that she must eventually 
marry if Ulysses did not return. 

The Roman women of the early period were under the 
dominion of men. A father had absolute power over his 
daughter until he gave her to her husband. Giving and receiving 
involved possession. There developed a very considerable degree 
of freedom for women in the later periods but at no time were 
they accounted the equals of men, capable of taking an active 
part in the government. 

From the Old Testament may be collected a long list of 
notable women, but the oriental idea prevails. Women were ob- 
jects to be given, bartered, exchanged at the will of their owners, 
men. The tenth commandment would be an insult to every 
thinking woman today if she did not realize that in classing a 
man's wife with his other material possessions (and not even 
first) it refers to conditions over three thousand years ago which 
happily do not now, as a rule, exist in our Western world. But 
we must not forget that there are millions of women in eastern 
countries who are accounted mere females, the possessions of men. 

Christ treated women as the equal of men and His just and 
humane example has done much to aid the cause of womankind, 

72 



T5\)t College i&reetlngs 



but Saint Paul's injunctions, revealing the ingrained, oriental 
influence, have gone far toward nullifying the liberal teaching 
of his Master. 

In our own country when the Constitution was drafted in 
1787, "We, the people" meant We, the men, for no one 
dreamed of women taking an active part in the affairs of state. 
The struggle to open to women equal educational advantages 
with men even more than the long fight for equal 
political rights shows how hard it is to break the age-old bonds 
of custom and precedent, even in a country where ideas of liberty 
and equality prevail. Since it took nearly a century and a quar- 
ter to win for women of the United States that political recogni- 
tion which admits them to full citizenship, it is clear that many 
years must pass before other less enlightened countries can be 
educated to appreciate the necessity of extending common justice 
to their women. 

We are living in a man-made world, and the fighting spirit 
rules. The military idea is the standard of measurement of all 
things. Women are not by nature warlike. The mothers of the 
race intuitively stretch out their arms to protect mankind, their 
children. The world needs their protecting care, and slowly but 
surely woman is winning her way to work, not fight, shoulder 
to shoulder with her partner, man. 

Work, co-operation, not fight, competition, must be the 
world's objective. Creation, not destruction, is the destiny of 
mankind and thus far the race has strayed from its path. Is it 
not because one half of its personnel has been looked upon as in- 
ferior? 

Women are people. We know it; but it will be many a 
weary year before the world at large so considers them. They 
need much training to get them out of the narrow groove into 
which they have been pushed for centuries. Illinois Woman's 
College is doing her part in teaching the girls that come under her 
care to feel their responsibilities and in preparing them to 
take an active, intelligent share in the work of the world. 

— F. E. Wakeley. 
73 



. 



Oljc College Greetings 



BALLADE 

Prince of Romance, Keeper of Youth, 
A natural subject I live 'neath your sway, 
Filled with a love of adventure and mirth, 
Heart for music and blossoms of May. 

Sourness and sadness and drabness of soul, 
Primness and staidness I abhor with a will. 
If age creeps upon me, as age surely must, 
Let age increase laughter and keep me young still. 

Prince of Romance, Keeper of Youth, 
Preserve me a spirit bold and gay. 
Save me a love of adventure and mirth, 
Heart for music and blossoms of May. 

— Audrey King 
t innm ) 

"'TIS MORE BLESSED TO GIVE—'' 

By Mary McMillan, '26 

Mrs. Bluffs, moist and uncomfortable, was spending the 
hot August afternoon in the shade of her lovely porch. Being 
fifty and weighing not less than two hundred pounds, she could 
not exert herself on such a day as this. Mrs. Bluffs was amusing 
herself by looking over the cards of thanks she had received this 
last year from five brides to whom she had sent wedding presents. 
She always gave such lovely presents! In fact, no one in town 
had such good taste as she. 

"Good afternoon, Mrs. Bluffs," called a merry voice from 
the street. 

"Why, how do you do, Katy? Are you coming up to see 
me this hot afternoon?" 

"Yes, for just a few minutes. We're all just dreadfully busy 
getting ready for the Sale. You know, it's to raise money for 
the library." 

74 



Ohe (Tollege (Brtetings 



"And you want everybody to give something, I suppose. 
I have a beautiful tray, all gilded and decorated with the most 
beautiful roses. You may have that." 

Katy shuddered slightly. "Oh, thank you, so much. We 
shall appreciate everything we get." 

Mrs. Bluffs ceased fanning, and pointed to the cards in her 
lap. 

"I was just looking over cards of thanks I got from Marian, 
Helen, Ruth, Dorothy and Marcia. You know I received in- 
vitations to all their weddings. Yes," she smiled serenely at Katy, 
"I'm quite a favorite with all the young girls. And I do so 
love to give them presents, things by which they can remember 
me always. Do you remember that handsome vase I gave Mar- 
ian? Oh, my dear, it was really quite expensive, but I got it 
at a sale, and saved forty-eight cents on it. You know what it 
was like; all bulgy at the bottom with a short, thin neck, and 
then quite spreading at the mouth. It seemed so- so- well, I 
guess I mean Oriental-like." 

Katy nodded. Yes, how well she remembered that vase! 
What a torture it was to even look at it. Marian had always 
kept it in the attic. 

But Mrs. Bluffs was continuing: 

"And that beautiful luncheon cloth I gave Helen! I got 
that down at Stevens for a dollar-ninety-eight. It was such a 
bargain ! It was just covered with large pink roses, and yellow 
and purple butterflies. I always was kinda partial to pink roses 
and butterflies. They just seem to go together somehow." 

Katy remembered what laughter the opening of that pack- 
age had elicited. Helen had said that she was going to keep that 
near her all the time, and if she ever got to feeling despondent, 
she would get out that luncheon cloth and have a real good 
giggle. "Yes, one look at that thing would give you either the 
giggles or hysterics," Marian had said. "Why it's even worse 
than my vase!" 

Mrs. Bluffs picked up another card. "And what did I give 
Ruth? Oh yes, that trinket-cabinet done in beautiful French 

75 



Orje College (Breedings 



gilt. Now that was a real present. I always bad a hankering 
after one of them myself." 

"Ruth would be only too glad to loan it to you, if you ever 
need it, I'm sure," suggested Katy. She knew only too well 
how delighted Ruth would be to get that horrid thing out of the 
house. Even the maid had failed to appreciate it when it had 
been put into her room. 

"I gave Dorothy a lamp, didn't I?" 

Katy groaned inwardly. She hoped that she would never 
have to look at that lamp again. But Mrs. Bluffs was still rem- 
iniscing: 

"Yes, a lamp. It was a bronze figure of Venice, or Cupid, 
or some one of those heathens holding the top part which had a 
lovely cerise velvet shade all covered with beads and embroidery. 
Yes, that was quite a beauty! I've never seen anything like it." 

"No," said Katy, and to herself she added, "and you never 
will." 

"But what did I give Marcia? It wasn't candle sticks, was 
it? No, I decided to keep those for myself" 

"I think you gave Marcia one of those water-colors you did 
while you were studying art, didn't you?" 

Mrs. Bluffs smiled. 

"Why, so I did. It was that one of a sun-set, wasn't it? 
Why, I remember. That was really the most artistic thing I ever 
did. I think I must have had divine inspiration for that." 

Katy was sure the inspiration wasn't divine. 

"And the blending of colors, and in the foreground that 
lovely little calf against a flaming, burnished sky. Why, what is 
the matter, my dear?" 

Katy was choking, gasping for her breath. "N-n-noth— 
nothing, thank you. All I need is a drink of water." She went 
to the well to get a drink, and when she returned, was quite her 
controlled self. 

"I think I must be going now. I have to see quite a few 
people before dinner. I'll call later for your tray. Good-bye." 

"Good-bye, Katy. Come again, won't you-" 

76 



T5\)& (College (Greetings 



"Yes, thank you, Mrs. Bluffs, and do come call on mother 
soon. She'd love to have you." After carefully closing the gate 
behind her, Katy hurried off down the street- 
It was the evening of the White Elephant Sale. Katy, 
dressed in a pretty white organdie, was rushing here and there 
arranging last minute details, and persuading people to buy as 
many articles as they could. Suddenly she espied Mrs. Bluffs, 
who with a bit of urging ought to be a good customer. 

"Oh, Mrs. Bluffs, you're going to buy something at the 
sale, aren't you? Please buy as many things as you can." 

Mrs. Bluffs smiled aimably, "Why yes, I'm going to buy 
some. When does the sale begin?" 

"Immediately. See, they are starting to sell now." 
Mrs. Bluffs pushed forward into the first row. She was 
going to see something of what she was buying. Of course, the 
packages were wrapped, but perhaps she could guess by the shape 
of them what they contained. Maybe some of the things would 
do for gifts later on. 

At the end of a half hour, everything had been sold. Mrs. 
Bluffs, hot and disheveled, but triumphant, nevertheless, pushed 
her way to a chair, with her arms full of packages. She sat down 
and began untying the packages. As the first article came to 
view, Mrs. Bluffs gave a little cry of surprise; when she had 
opened the second package, she gave a snort of anger, and with 
the disclosing of the contents of each succeeding package, she ap- 
proached a state of rage. As she opened the last, she arose with a 
surprising quickness, threw the articles roughly on the ground, 
and stamped out of the room, with her head held high. The 
people who had stood near her were watching curiously. Katy, 
struck with a sudden thought, hurried over to the chair where 
Mrs. Bluffs had opened her packages. Yes, they were all there! 
Stooping, she gingerly picked them up, and laid them on the 
chair: one vase, oriental in design; one luncheon cloth, decorated 
with pink roses and butterflies; one trinket cabinet, gorgeously 
gilded; one lamp of strange and intricate design; and one most 
colorful water-color, depiciting a lonely little calf against an ex- 
ceedingly gorgeous evening sky. 

77 



, 



T5\><i (TolUge (Greetings 



WARBLING FOR DOLLARS 

Bee Hasenstab started it all by talking to a man on the train. 
He was a Reverend, travelling for the Anti-Saloon League, so 
that it was perfectly proper, although Bee probably didn't know 
this in advance. At any rate, she told him about Endowment 
and he gave her a dime for her card. The rest of the I. W. C. 
homeward-bound crowd had gathered around by that time, ten 
in all, Ruth Webb, Gertrude Jacquith, Lucille Winn, Lois 
Wiersema, Ruth Kelly, Myrtle Lord, Mary Thompson, Miss 
Whitmer and Miss Swanson. 

Then the inspiration came, — an Endowment Concert! 

Miss Whitmer led, so of course "Yon Yonsen" was on the 
program. But first the passengers on the night C. ft A- were 
startled by a plea for "Sociability." "The Hungry Dog" was 
rendered with feeling, and "A Man Without a Woman" brought 
down the house. "By Stately Elms Surrounded" was a fitting 
climax. 

Then Bee's kind friend made an announcement, and they 
all passed the hat. Dimes, quarters, dollars! Said the kind man, 
"Let's go to another car!" 

Stage fright seized the young prima donnas, but the sight 
of silver inspired to further effort. One more car was entertained, 
and then the smoker. Total result $24.00. 

"It must be $25.00!" said the man. 

"What's all the racket?" inquired two men, coming from 
the diner. 

They were promptly informed, and a result the sum be- 
came $25.50. 

"Did you get that fat Irishman in the next car?" asked one. 
"Go after him." 

The fat Irishman had already contributed, but being fat 
and Irish he allowed himself to be relieved of fifty cents more. 
Net total $26.00! 

So here's to Reverend Yule who managed the little tour 
and here's to the ten lusty warblers. May their voices always 
be silver! 

78 



Obc (Tollegc (Breedings 






A NEW ORGANIZATION. 

With significant world events taking place like a three- 
ringed circus, so many and so fast that if you stop to hear the 
British lion roar you miss the performance of the Turkish jugg- 
ler, I. W. C. felt that it just couldn't keep up-to-date and at the 
same time get its history lessons which give the foundation of 
these events. So as a supplement to its classes the department of 
History and Social Science has organized a History Club for the 
discussion of present affairs. Membership is limited to those in 
the department. Professor Lobdell is adviser, and Thelma Pires 
president. There have already been several good meetings. The 
Greetings congratulates the department on its vigor and the col- 
lege on the possession of a new organization with a real function. 



Dininc 



A LETTER FROM MIRIAM 
Dear Marg:- 

Why is it that humans are so distractingly interesting? I 
believe with Edgar Guest that there is nothing quite like "just 
folks" to keep up one's interest in this old worn-out, thrill- 
exhausted world. If people only knew how much more enter- 
taining it was to hold down a job dealing with "folks", instead 
of juggling stocks and bonds, automobiles and silk, all for the 
filthy pelf — well, I'm afraid there would be a rush for my job, 
and I like it too well myself. So don't spread it too widely, if 
I tell you, how fascinating my work is among the alumnae. It 
isn't work, Marg, — its a twelve reel cinema, shown daily. 

You see I ring the honorable door bell of some good alum- 
nae matron's door and tell her maid, that I (including my full 
title of Alumnae Field Secretary of the Illinois Woman's Col- 
lege, to show her how important I am) have arrived. I have pre- 
viously memorized this lady's name, her maiden name, the year 
of her class when she was in college, and even looked up the 
name of some other person in that class so I can intelligently rem- 
inice (is there such a word?) with her. My hostess appears and 

79 






Ofyc (TolUgc (Breetlngs 



honestly you'd be surprised how glad she is to talk to me. I 
don't take that eagerness personally, of course, for I know that 
it is prompted by a desire to recall old days at the Woman's 
College. And again you would be amazed how the years be- 
tween us fall away, as that dear old soul, flapper of '68, chats on 
with me of our beloved Alma Mater. Yes, we swap gossip like 
two good "roomies" after Christmas vacation. I tell her that 
even Freshmen go now to the movies without chaperones, and 
she holds me fascinated with lurid tales of stolen spreads and 
pranks our "Age of Innocence" would never think of- Then I 
tell her of our Alumnae plans and how anxious we are to find 
every one and keep accurate record thereof, and of our coming 
1923 Alumnae directory. She helps me out by remembering 
the present address of her old roommate whom we had had on 
our casualty list "reported missing" for years maybe. 

So we chat along for an hour, and then because it's about 
four o'clock, and she knows girls, she has her maid bring in tea 
and honey cakes and salted almonds, and my enthusiasm for 
this Alumna waxes higher and higher. Can you blame me? Well, 
I've earned those honey cakes, Margaret, for the questions one 
can answer in a day are pretty nearly countless. I must know 
everything in and about Illinois Woman's College that has hap- 
pened for the last fifty years, and be ready to make it sound con- 
vincing too, when I tell it. Imagine these broadcasted at you in 
as many minutes: 

"Well, who is dean down there? I remember once when 
when Miss Weaver — ;" "Are dear Dr. and Mrs. Harker well?" 
"What are your endowment plans for next year?" "Is Miss 
Knopf still wearing blue and does she make the freshmen cry as 
of old?" "You say they are using the honor system — how does 
it work out?Listen,do the Belles Lettres still have the picture our 
class gave?" "Don't tell me little Georgie Metcalf is a big boy in 
High School! Why how old is he now?" 

I haven't any idea, but you may believe I guess! 

Oh of course not each visit I make is similar to the one of 

80 



Obe College (Brewings 



which I told. They are all colorfully different. That is what 
makes it so interesting. In one day I have called on: a young 
thing, newly wed, of the class of '20, who showed me all over 
her new house and asked about you and everyone; a dear little 
lady in a wheel chair, who told me of days "before the fire"; a 
smart young matron just rushing off to a club who has only a 
minute to spare; the daughter of the Governor at the Executive 
mansion next; a busy mother proud of her three darling child- 
ren, who talks to me about the time when the oldest daughter 
will be ready for I. W. C. ; and finally a portly madam who en- 
tertains me in her bedroom where two maids are curling her hair. 

Yes, it's heaps of fun, visiting these alumnae of mine. 

This friendly little note is also to warn you of the coming 
rival to your beloved Greetings. The Illinois Woman's College 
Alumnae News is going to grow this year into a thriving maga- 
zine of universal fame, Marg, believe us. 

In fraternal friendliness, 

Miriam McOmbet. 



Dnnnc 



Blink — "I hear your auto was stolen." 

Blank — "Yes, but I got it back. I put an add in the paper." 

Blink — "What did you say?" 

Blank — "I said, 'Lizzie, come home. All is forgiven.' " 

—Ex. 

I >TTTTTT< > 

Carol R. to Eloise C. — "Why are you knitting with your 
mouth open? To catch the stitches you drop?" 

< nnmt > 

Reporter: "And in what state were born, professor?" 
Prof.: "Unless my recollection fails me in a state of ignor- 
ance." 

Reporter: (scribbling) : "Yes, to be sure, and how long 
have you lived there?' — Baker Orange. 

81 



^5r><2. (TolUgc (Breetings 



MORE RECOGNITION FOR MISS KNOPF. 

"The John Hcrrin Art Institute of Indianapolis has asked 
Professor Nellie A. Knopf of Illinois Woman's College for the 
privilege of exhibiting her painting "From the Top of Mount 
Manitou" at their annual exhibition of American paintings to 
be held during January. This picture is now on exhibition at 
the Chicago Art Institute in the thirty-fifth annual exhibition 
of oil paintings by American artists. The Omaha Fine Arts Mus- 
eum has asked for her painting "Pike's Peak" for its annual ex- 
hibition to be held next month. These two canvasses were 
painted in Colorado last summer, where Professor Knopf spent 
her vacation." — From M. E. Board of Education News Bulletin. 



Dnnnc 



SOME DAY 



Some day I'm going to be quite bold and bad. Some day 
when I have something important to do, like an exam, or an an- 
nouncement to make, or a part to take in a stunt, I'm going to 
fool them! I'll get on a train for somewhere and get off at no- 
where in particular, and spend the day. If the town has a 
movie I'll go. If not, I'll eat a ham sandwich in a restaurant 
and enjoy myself thinking what a stew they are in trying to find 
me. 

Then when I go back I'll walk in quite casually. And some- 
one will say, "What did you think of the exam this morning? 
What? You weren't there?" And I'll meet somebody who was 
to be in the stunt and say, "Will the stunt be given tomorrow?" 
And she'll look surprised, — "Why, didn't it go off in good shape 
today? By the way, why didn't you come? I had to take 
your part. It went off all right, tho'." And you'll feel flat, like 
a balloon with a pin stuck in it, and you'll creep meekly away to 
study, and resolve to stick around in the future, so they won't 
find out you're not indispensible. 

By One who goes in the elevator first. 
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<3r>e College (Breetlngs 




Study, study, little girl, 
'Til your brain is in a twirl! 
I can see your shielded light 
In the sraa' hours of the night. 
Fuddled is your curly head, 
And your eyes are growing red, 
And the little mouse that likes 
To frolic in your room o' nights 
Has to stay beneath the floor, 
Thinking, "What a deadful bore." 
Little lady, 
Silly dear, — 
Study daily 
And don't fear. 
Cramming never gets one by, 
And it's just no use to try. 
Put your curlers on your head, 
Say your prayers, and go to bed. 




Z3l)£ (Tollege (Greetings 



Vo/. XX VI. Jacksonville, III., Jan., 1923 No. 4 

STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 

Associate Editor Eloise Calhoun 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 



MORE OPPORTUNITY 

The subject of "Opportunity" has been talked at this gen- 
eration so often — almost from the day they entered school — that 
the college student generally resents the mention of the word. I 
realize this and sympathize, yet I could not but help but trans- 
late something that Doctor Harker said in Chapel a few morn- 
ings ago in terms of opportunity. He was, you remember, 
quoting the words of Christ, when he said, "Work while it is 
day, for the night cometh!" In my mind I put it this way: 
Take advantage of every opportunity as it presents itself, for the 
time will come when there will be none. 

The great number of clubs and organizations here in school 
are so many opportunities. Look about you in the class room 
or at a recital. That girl in front of you is studying voice, she 
has ambitions to study aboard some day. The girl to her left is 
a whiz at foreign languages. While the person sitting next to you 
is majoring in English, with already, they say, something ac- 
cepted by one of the magazines. There are very few whom you 
could not classify, for, altho not many people are geniuses nor 
many more blessed by much talent almost everyone has a natural 
inclination for something or other. This school, like every 
school, has realized the fact and has encouraged all organizations 

84 



C?b<t College (Greetings 



that aid the development of these inclinations. There are the 
Madrigal and the Glee Clubs for the singer, the Spanish and the 
French Clubs for the girl interested in languages, the History 
Club for the world citizen, Scribblers' Club for the would-be- 
writer, the Dramatic Club for her who likes to act, the Y. W. for 
the social service and girls' welfare worker — on and on down the 
list of a great many organizations that we have in school. 

It has been said that college places its students in an artificial 
atmosphere. Like a castle, it protects its inmates from assaults 
and assailants that would have to be met outside — the hard 
knocks of life and experience. But to carry the analogy farther, 
this castle has in it rooms, in which one may take down a sword 
from the wall and learn to defend oneself from a friendly op- 
ponent in anticipation of a more hostile one later on; there are 
rooms which are hung with armor, lances, and battleaxes, with 
which one may engage in practice fray; there are rooms where 
one may wrestle; courts where one may ride. In short, with- 
in these walls one may try out one's strength in order to be entire- 
ly ready for what one will meet outside when the castle gates are 
opened and the drawbridge let down- In our analogy, these 
rooms are the clubs and the organizations here. While you are 
yet in college, you will probably never meet with real experience- 
but you can be prepared to meet it by pitting your talents against 
the talents of those who are interested in the same lines that you 
are. Take advantage of another of your opportunities. 

— D. Diernan. 

I nTTTTTC > 

The Alumnae News, edited by, — well, I've just been try- 
ing to find out by whom, and as no one person will plead guilty, 
I'll name all concerned, — Miss Esther Davis and Miss Genevieve 
Mount, frequently helped by Miss Miriam McOmber; they can 
share the glory as they share the work. We have heard it called 
a "satisfying" paper, and know from personal observation that 
it is simply "gobbled up" by news-hungry alumnae. It ranks 
well with other alumnae publications with which we are fami- 
liar. The Greetings extends its heartiest good wishes. 

85 



Orie College (Breetlngs 



OBSERVATIONS OF OPHELIA 

In the second violent epidemic of bobbed hair which has hit 
this institution, it seems as if even the staid and sober souls like 
Elaine Rosness have fallen from grace. The only thing for the 
extremists to do now is to have theirs shingled. 

The reason that Ethel Morris sold that ton of coal she drew 
in the Gift Campaign lottery was because Charlotte refused to 
live with her if she stored it under the bed. Charlotte said that 
Ethel is a brunette so perhaps it wouldn't have bothered her 
much but that coal and blondes don't mix. 

Sarita said the other day she wished that she were twins, 
and that one of her had staid in South America while the other 
came here, so that when she went home she would know what 
she'd have been like if she hadn't come. 

$223 from the Secretarial Dept. dollar signs is a good rec- 
ord and Genevie Blankenship was clever to think of all those 
ways to get that $20, but Ophelia thinks she can go one better. 
She herewith submits the following suggestions for endowment 
money-raisers: 

Turning off electric lights. 

Polishing the handles on the bureau drawers. 

"Fishing" tooth brushes out of the lock-up. 

Telling "what the lesson is" at the rate of 5 cents per lesson 
if it's a chapter, 1 o cents if you have to give the pages. 

Collecting toll from those walking across Harker Hall 
bridge after 10 P. M. 

Reading and answering a friend's correspondence. 

But most renumerative of all would be to establish an 
agency for dates. I'd suggest 25 cents for a Sunday night, and 
knock off 10 cents if it included going to Epworth League. 
Shows ought to be good for 50 cents. We are told that a Date 
Bureau has actually been established at the University of Chicago. 

86 



Obe College (Breetlngs 



Martha Logan wrote the play that the Spanish Club pres- 
ented, and those who were invited say it was the sparrow's 
lingerie-clasps for cleverness. But Martha told me once she in- 
tended to be lawyer, and she ought to be warned that law and 
play-writing mix about as well as cocoa-cola and chewing gum. 

Ruth Webb was telling us how they warbled for endow- 
ment on the train. "They handed us dollar bills," she said. One 
man said, 'It's a good cause', and another one answered, 'It's a 
righteous cause" Amen, brother! 

— Ophelia. 
< )nnm > 

IN A SOPH'S SCRAP-BOOK 
Are found the following bright bits. 
"The cows are in the meadow, 
The sheep are in the grass, 
And all the fluffy little geese 
Are in the Freshman class." 

Never mind, Freshmen — 
The cat alone can mew. 
The lion is all that roars, 
But when it comes to crowing 
Just hear the Sophomores! 

— Greetings 

Virginia Gentry (to Miss Merriman in sewing) — Do I 
gather the sleeve into the arm-hole or the arm-hole into the 
sleeve? 

Miss Abbott — What are the clauses? 

M. Slough — Something that grow on cats. 

Miss Lobdell — For what is Switzerland famous? 
Billie Betcher — Swiss cheese. 

Miss L — .O, something greater, — more impressive, — 
Billie — Limberger ! 

— 'Snuff, Soph. Thanks. 
87 






Ofy<t College (Breetlngs 



ATTENTION! LES ELEVES de FRANC AIS ct ESPANOL 

Note: An American printing press lacks accent marks, so 
the reader must supply her own- 
Presque, Mais Pas Entiercmcnt 
— Et toi, on ne t'a pas demandec en mariage? 

— Presque . . je veux dire qu'on s'est deja informe 
plusieurs foir de ce que je pouvais avoir de dot. 

— U Illustration. 

Aujourd' hui en Allemagne 

— Monsieur, mon bon monsieur*** la charite, s'il vous plait — 
Donnez-moi deux ou trois cent mille marks pour aller dejeuner? 

— U Illustration. 

Le DROMADAIRE 

Avec ses quatres dromadaires 
Don Pedro d'Alfaroubeira 
Courut le monde et l'admira. 
II fit ce que je voudrais faire 
Si j'avais quatre dromadaires. 



— Vanity Fair. 



( nmnc 



Miss Esparza to Gertrude Jacquith — Va usted a su sala de 
clase. 

Va usted a su sala de clase. 

Gertrude — Si, senor. 

Miss Esparza — Pero no soy senor, soy una senorita. 

Gertrude — Es que la maestra, la Senorita Johnston, nos ha 
dicho que las ninas bien educadas deben decir siempre: Si, senor. 

Martha Logan — Y para que yo preste a Ud. esa cantidad, ; 
que garantia me propone? 

Audrey King — No barta la palabra de una senorita. 

Martha — Desde luego; pero, donde esta esa senorita. 

88 



X3^e College (Briefings 



IT'S ALL IN HER DAILY ROUTINE. 
By Ruby Jensen 

A dong-g dong-g dong-g of a bell broke the peaceful si- 
lence of the early morning. Gradually there was a scurry and 
scuffle in the different rooms of the girl's dormitory. There was 
the banging of doors, and the slamming of many windows for 
the weather was cold. 

In one room alone was stillness. Here Elaine slept peace- 
fully undisturbed by the ringing of the be!! or the noise of her 
neighbors. More banging of doors, and the various neighbors 
ran by her room on their way down to breakfast. The clock 
ticked forth the minutes, but still the girl slept on. 

The sleeper was hidden under a mass of quilts. After a 
while the downy covers were shoved upward. Then a curly 
head was revealed. 

"Br-r-r-r it's cold. Wonder what time it is?" drowsily mur- 
mured the girl, and with that she blinked one eye, shifted over, 
put the covers once more over her head, and in a few minutes 
was fast asleep again. 

The clock ticked on. There was more banging of doors 
and the sound of footsteps through the corridor, for the girls 
were returning from the dining room. Someone rapped on the 
sleeping girl's door. There was no answer. Someone turned the 
knob, but the door was securely fastened. 

The clock ticked on. At length there was a loud knocking 
and rapping on Elaine's door. This time the sleeper stirred. 
The curly head was again revealed. She finally sat up, rubbed 
her eyes, and after a few minutes became aware of the sound. 
"Who's there?" 

"It's me," replied a voice — an answer as helpful as it was 
grammatical. "Do you know you have only fifteen minutes be- 
fore your English class begins?" 

"Honest?" demanded Elaine. With that she sprang out 
of bed and grabbed frantically for her clothes. 

There were no buttons where they were supposed to be. 

89 



A 



Obe College (Breetings 



The stiff piece was off her shoe lace, and it was with maddening 
haste that she was endeavoring to lace them. She seemed to 
get nowhere. 

, Her hair was stubborn, and of course she had to further 
delay herself by spilling a bottle of ink- There were no blotters 
handy and a hurried attempt to open a drawer caused it to fall 
on the floor, spilling its contents. 

By the time Elaine was dressed, she was not in a very favor- 
able mood. Again there was a rapping at the door. This 
time four of her friends entered. 

"Are you almost ready?" they demanded. 

"I'm slammed together somehow," answered Elaine. 

"Got your English book?" asked one of the girls. 

"Get it on the shelf for me," ordered Elaine who was dab- 
bing powder on her nose and crunching a cracker. 

"There was the bell," called one of them. 

With this they rushed off and said, "See you later, old 
dear!" 

Elaine finished buttoning her dress, while dashing down to 
her English class. Great was her surprise when she reached the 
classroom to find herself the first one there. She sat down and 
began hurriedly scanning her lesson, for she had attended a 
movie the night before and had made no preparation. 

After a few minutes, she wondered why her classmates did 
not appear. And then it dawned upon her with disgusting 
realization. It was Sunday. 



Dnnnc 



The color has faded from cheeks once so red. 

Sharp pains are shooting all thru my head. 

I feel as if I were nearly dead. 

But what do I care if my cheeks lack red, 

Or for billions of pains shooting all thru my head, 

Or for feeling as if I were really dead — 

My French is translated! 

— Lena Bennett. 
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X5l)c College (Greetings 



PRIVILEGES 

What do you think of the privileges at I. W. C? Your 
attitude toward your college is determined to a great extent by 
your idea of the privileges you are given. You cannot be satisfied 
in your work if you always think that you are being mistreated, 
and that someone has made rules just to spite you. 

Girls, we are the ones who make the rules. Our actions 
determine whether the privileges shall be many or few. If we 
think we do not have enough liberty let us work and show that 
we are deserving of more, and that we will not abuse it. It is 
hard for anyone to decide where the line should be drawn, and 
we should not make it harder by finding fault- When over two 
hundred girls are brought together and are forced to abide by 
the same rules, some mistakes will be made of course, but it is 
better to have the rules a little too strict than to have them too 
lax. Our rules are not too strict and our privileges are not too 
few. If you do not believe this, take our brown book and com- 
pare it with such books from other schools. You will feel that 
we are very fortunate. I have investigated and have asked ques- 
tions, and have found that in the average woman's college the 
girls are allowed to go very few places without a chaperon; in 
fact, they are often not allowed in town alone. Here we are 
trusted and we should feel the responsibility. Girls, let's not 
crab because there are some rules that do not please us, but think 
of the many privileges we have and be glad that we are fortunate 
enough to be I. W. C. girls. 

— Kathleen Shirley 

l >TTTTTT< > 

Mrs- Prof. — "Are you quite sure you are true to me?" 

Mr. Prof. — "Why of course, dear, what an absurd ques- 
tion." 

Mrs. Prof. — "Well then, kindly explain who this Violet 
Ray is you are always talking about." — Ohio Northern Review. 

Ruth — "Do you like indoor sports?" 

Dorothy — "Yes, if they go home early." — Baker Orange. 

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Z3l)£ College (Greetings 



JOBS FOR THE SENIORS. 

"Go West, young woman!" shout the Seniors. They are 
inspired with the pioneering spirit, and are preparing to make 
a charge on the western high schools next fall, armed with their 
diplomas and teacher's certificates. 

Flo has the route studied out on the time-table until she 
knows just where on the Santa Fe road she is going to purchase 
a newspaper. Ruth Webb and Billie practice nightly shooting 
at a bulls-eye. Alma gets out in the hall with a lariat and tries 
to lasso the drinking-fountain. Flossie Weber can't decide 
whether to offer her services to Wyoming or Arizona, and with 
her usual reckless nature she will probably flip a coin to decide. 
Eloise is collecting pictures of cow-boys. And really, with Helen 
Massie with a position already, although it isn't in the west, and 
with Ada and Dorothy Mae taking the Home Ec. Civil Service 
exams at Springfield, it begins to look as if jobs for the Seniors 
might be more than talk. 

Gert Unversaw is the most troublesome rebel to the Western 
policy. She has an office job at Washington, D. C. as her aim. 
Well, perhaps we'd better let her go, so that the East will know 
that there is a class of '23, while the rest of us are invading the 
Golden West.. 

—M. F. 

( >nnn< > 

SNAP-SHOTS OF THE WEST 
By Itma Stutdevant 
The Round House 
The "Round House" is a typical Indian dance hall on the 
old Rosebud Sioux reservation. It is, as the name implies, round 
and constructed of logs. 

There is so much to observe, that upon first entering the 
room, one's mind seems to be conscious of nothing more definite 
than a confusion of noises, colors and odors. 

The old squaws sit upon the floor on one side of the hall. 
Although the time of the year may be midsummer and the heat 

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X3bfc College (Brtetlngs 



most intense, nevertheless the squaw will be wrapped in her 
shawl with only dark shiny hair and bright black eyes showing 
above the gaily colored raiment. Most of the Indian women 
may be puffing at the stub of a cigarette while they endeavor to 
quiet the restless children- 
Standing on the opposite side of the room from the semi- 
circle of women and children are the old chiefs disdainful of their 
surrounding but conscious of their own most picturesque and 
ornate dress. 

On a long bench apart from the others, sits a group of coy 
Indian girls, chattering and laughing while their bright roving 
eyes glance around at the window where groups of cowboys 
are watching the progress of the dance. 

In the center of the hall a small group of Indians is con- 
gregated around a tom-tom which emits a muffled tattoo. To 
this rhythmic beating, a number of the tribal host sing in wierd 
voices a monotonous tune which increases in volume and speed 
as the dance progresses and the gestures of the performers become 
wilder and more free. 

Between the dances one of the old warriors advances toward 
the center of the room and proceeds to give in full detail the ex- 
ploits of some Indian hero- 

The dance continues until daybreak. The crowd then dis- 
perses and each family leaves for its own place of abode. 

i >tttttt< i 

The Broncho 

The eager crowd thrilled with the excitement of the day's 
sport. With breathless anticipation, it waited for the next bron- 
cho and rider to bound from the chute into the arena. 

Nightmare, number three on the programme, was a small 
gray pony. Fiery black pupils shone in the large whites of his 
eyes, eyes which glittered with temper and defiance. 

There was a sharp cry. Cowboy and pony sprang from the 
chute. Like one body the crowd arose in the grand stand. A 
low gasp passed over the throng. The people held their breaths. 

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T5t)& College (Greetings 



With a reckless cry, the cowboy waved his hat over his head 
and dug the spurs into his horses-flanks. The pony reared and 
bucked. White foam dripped from its mouth, and blood from 
the gray flanks, where the spurs had pierced. The horse leaped 
forward, suddenly lowering its head, and finally succeeded in 
pitching his exhausted rider to the ground. The pony then 
bounded over near the grandstand and leaped the fence, which 
surrounded the arena. Cowboys, Indians and other onlookers 
fled in every direction to escape the path of this desperate outlaw 
horse. When the spectators turned, they saw the cowboy be- 
ing carried from the field. 

Those who had traveled great distances to see the contest 
felt that they had had ample introduction into the ways of the 
west. They had seen an actual western drama, enacted on 
western soil. The actors had lived their parts and the play had 
progressed without prearrangement of plot or outline. 

I > TTTTTT < > 

SEALED BIDS 

The Hon. H. C. Vise is president of the National Bank, 
owns the Lindell Hotel and over a thousand acres of land, and 
lives in the nicest house in town. He is always interested in the 
community, and uses his time and money freely for any worthy 
reform. 

Dr. J. H. Boster, a retired doctor, is president of the Peoples' 
Bank, owns a farm or two, and lives in the largest house in town. 
He too is interested in the welfare of the people, but it is because 
he can not allow Vise to receive all the praise. When the sub- 
scriptions for any drive are taken, Boster always waits until 
Vise has made his pledge so that he will be able to subscribe fifty 
cents more. In private life he is a confirmed tight-wad. He consid- 
ers it useless to spend money, or help people when such aids will 
not be known to the public. There is always some current joke 
about him. They say that as he was driving in from the farm 
last week a man asked him for a lift. He studied a moment and 

94 



Orjc College (Breetings 



said, "Well get in. I don't suppose it will take any more gaso- 
line." 

Vise and Boster, for the last ten years, have been trying to 
buy the same ten acres of land, — Vise, to finish out a section, and 
Boster, to keep him from finishing that section- 

The plot of ground was put up for sale last week to be sold 
by bid to the highest bidder. The people were excited about 
the sale, not because there were so many bidders, — there were 
only two, but because of the quality of them — the two most be 
influential citizens. 

Boster gave his bid first. He took a pad from the table and 
wrote in heavy figures as if the land already belonged to him, 
$501.00. He had heard, in some mysterious way, that Vise was 
going to bid $500.00. He was very much pleased with himself. 
He tore the sheet off and handed the pad to Vise. 

Vise prepared to write. There, impressed on the paper, 
was Boster's bid, — $501.00. With the business man's conscience 
he wrote $502.00. 

Boster cannot understand what caused Vise to bid $502.00. 
Vise in confiding to a friend said, "I may explain to him some 
day." — Lena Bennett. 

t ITTlTni 1 

MY TREE 

All beauty of the world 

Is summed up in my tree. 

'Tis winter, and my tree 

Is warring with the cold. 

His giant muscles swell beneath the bark. 

He knows that he must die, 
But fears not, since he knows 
His beauty is enshrined 
Forever in our hearts. 

May our lives, too, be worthy of remembrance. 

—'26 

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Ol)<2 College (Greetings 



EXCHANGES 

We have tried to lengthen the Exchange list this year and 
to include in it the publications of various kinds of schools. We 
are going to add a few more names to the list before the close of 
the year. At present we are exchanging with the following 
magazines: 

The Smith College Monthly. 
The Mt. Holyoke Round Table. 

The Kentucky Cardinal of the University of Louisville. 
The Purple Parrot of Rockford College. 

The Daedalian Monthly of Texas College of Industrial Art. 
The Frances Shimer Record. 

St. Mary's Chimes of St. Mary's College, Notre Dame. 
The Dearborn Independent, the Ford National Weekly. 
The New Student. 

i tmTTTI > 

Mildred Brown (relating Christmas experiences) — "O, the 
weather was perfectly wonderful while I was home — the nights 
were perfect — and the moonlight — ! (Pause) Heavens, but my 
lips are chapped!" 

( >TTTTTT( > 

Sarita — If I take this train what time will I get to Indiana- 
polis? 

Miss Johnston — O, some ungodly hour. 
Sarita — I don't want that. I am no heathen! 

Catherine Stephenson approves of cold plunges. She thinks 
that they are "easier than washing your face and hands, because 
you don't hesitate so long over them." 

Johnny Atherton — "Grand-daddy Harker, where is that 
thing they say is on top of your head? That bald they say is on 
top of your head. I don't see it!" 

Miss Neville — "When you get a new pair of golashes every- 
one will know of it, or rather they will hear of it." 

96 



Ol)« College (Breellngs 






"CANDY, MISTER?" 

Say, collegians, can't you remember way back — 

When you as a youngster used to say that when you got big 
you were going to own a soda fountain or a candy shop so 
that you could have all the good stuff you wanted to eat, — 
when you used to even envy the "barkers" who with their 
carefree "two fer a nick, five a dime," used to pass through 
the crowds that had gathered in the Court House yard to 
hear the weekly band concert — 'cause they could eat what- 
ever candy and popcorn they didn't sell? 
Of course "them days is gone forever." But remember the Satur- 
day night just before Christmas when a gang of us sold candy 
in the movie houses for endowment? Could you ever forget how 
dcucedly cold it was when you dared to even so much as stick 
your nose out of the door? That night my ambition of a life 
time was realized! I had become a candy barker, — not at a sum- 
mer band concert or under the "big top", but on the streets of 
Jacksonville, with the snow just beginning to fall fast enough 
to keep one moving if he wished to avert being turned into a 
snow man, and not only moving but talking. People like to be 
kidded, and the more you kid them the more they buy. Perhaps 
my experience as one of "those wild traveling women" did brace 
my nerve, or maybe it was just the cause. It was cold, but say, 
we did sell that candy! though confidentially, I'd hate to do it 
for a living. But I'd prefer it to taking in scrubbing. And any- 
way, "The first hundred years are always the hardest." 

— M. E. Logan, '25 



Dunne 



Mae Virgin suggests this motto for I. W. C. : 
"Boost, and the world boosts with you, 
Knock, and you're on the shelf; 
For the world gets sick of the one who kicks, 
And wishes she'd kick herself." 

97 



CAFE CONFECTIONERY 

^peacock 3nn | 



For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Our Fountain 

CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELER'S FANS 

JACKSONVILLE Ry. & LIGHT CO. 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
T. A. Chapin, Vice-President £. A. Chapm 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j" g" Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

GILBERTS DRUG STORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 






THE 
AYERS NATIONAL BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. F. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 




DIRECTORS 

ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-President H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

H. C. CLEMENT, Asst. Cashier W. G. GOEBEL, Asst. Cashier 



Member of Federal Reserve Bank 



The Store for ^^ 

DRESS GOODS AND SILKS OAD JOHNS § OEID'Q 

HOSIERY, GLOVES, CORSETS fl V;,i^, T 7 TTraIVT7rr7J 
NOTIONS 



The Dunlap 

(EUROPEAN) 

A HOTEL THAT APPEALS TO WOMEN 
John M. Rule, Manager 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN- 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 



Mollenbrok & McCuhlloug 



Vickery's 
♦♦.Colonial 3ttit..* 

The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Recep- 
tions and Luncheons 

We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any quan- 
tity. We also serve dinners,when reservation is made in 
advance. 

. 1213 WEST STATE STREET 

Illinois Telephone 93 Bell Telephone 67 




Andre & Andre 

Everything 

to completely furnish 

the home 

Wallace -Nutting Pictures 

Quality, Service, Satisfaction 

The Best Place to Trade, after all. 



If you want a thing of good report 

Go to the men who the "Greetings" support. 



Smith Federal 
Bakery 



Cleanliness 
is your buy word 

Quality 

is our watch-word 



I 

IF. J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
popular fancies of Late Fashion, always featuring the 
youthful lines so becoming, displayed daily in our Ready- 
to-Wear Section. 

i Dresses Coats Suits Skirts Furs 
Negligees Silk Underwear Blouses Lingerie 

F. J. Waddell & Company 



VOU will be pleased with our fine line of 
Jewelry and Silver wear 

Gifts Tkat Please . . . 

RUSSELL & THOMPSON 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BURTON 



The Home of Better 
Shoe Repairing 

223 WEST MORGAN STREET 



Flash Lights 

and 

Batteries 

PETERSON BROS. 

320 E. State St. 



"The Home of Crispette" 

The Sanitary 

Pop-corn and 
Crispette Shop 

Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Loop Cafeteria ant 
Care 



POPULAR PRICES 



WEST MORGAN STREET 



Do you want a Pic? 
Do you want a Pen? 
Don't forget to buy 
From the Greetings men, 



COME TO- 



FLORETHS 

For Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coat 



Jos. Burgert 

Dealer in 

G oo d S h oe s 



No. 26 

Nortk Side of Square 



DORWARTS 

Cask Market 

CHOICE MEATS 

OF ALL KINDS 

Both Phones 196 
No. 230 WEST STATE STREE 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lane's Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 



It's Well Worth Considering 



Fancy Box Stationery 
Address Books 

313 W. STATE ST. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 



Program Pencils 
Wahl Gold and Silver 
Eversnarp Pencils 

VA/. B. Rogers 



Use Brazola Coffee 

Sold by 

Jenkinson-Bode Co. 

Coffee Roasters and 

Wholesale Grocers 



Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
EVENING COURIER 

For Today's News 



FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
Catalogues, Pamphlets, Letter- 
Heads, etc., at lowest prices. 



WOMAN'S FURS 

The styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

{FRANK BYRNS ha s t t ORE 

Economy Grocery 

PURE FOODS 



Quality — Courtesy — Service 
East State Street 



Illnois Phone 49 



Cully Coffee Company 

The Home of Good Coffee 

PHONE 268 222 WEST STATE ST. 

Everything in Dry Goods and 
Millinery 

gJpi*. FLORETH'S ■"(H 

Trade West Side Dry Goods Co. Trade 

Widmayer's High Grade Meats, Etc, 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 
W. F. Widmaycr C. E. Segno 



If you want some knowledge 
Go to your faculty adviser 
If you want a purchase 
Go to a "Greetings" advertiser. 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



The Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the Hour 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARE 




Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle; 
West, in a beautiful, dignified, old college town, noted 
for its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are looking 
for a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORES 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 
74 S. SIDE SQ. 

Buckthorpe Brothers j 

Rialto 1 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 



Schram & Buhrman I 
Jewelers I 

BOTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL 



Wiegand Market 

224 E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 
Quality and Service our Motto 



DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS 

n n n n 



VKERIES 

[deal Baking Co. 
Smith Federal Bakery 

INKS 

Ayers National Bank 
Farrell State Bank 

)OK STORES— OFFICE SUP'S 

Lane's 

W. B. Rogers 

Book and Novelty Shop 

Ye Booke Shoppe 

.OTHING STORES 

Frank Byrns' Hat Store 
Myers' Bros, 
rom Duffner 
Tomlinson 

CONFECTIONERS 

W. S. Ehnie & Bro. 
Bonansinga 
Princess Candy Co. 
Peacock Inn 
Crispette Shop 
Mullenix & Hamilton 
Merrigan 

)CTORS 

Dr. W. 0. Wait 

tUG STORES 

Armstorog Drug Stores 
Soover Drug Co. 
Gilbert's Drug Stores 

tY GOODS. READY-TO-WEAR 

C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Floreth's (East Side) 

Floreth's (West Side) 

3. C. Phelps Dry Goods Co. 

Etabjohn & Reid 

Shanken's 

F. J. Waddell 

fEING AND CLEANING 

A. E. Schoedsack 
-ECTRIC SUPPLIES 

Jacksonville Ry and Light Co. 
Walsh Electric Co. 
Peterson Bros. 

.ORISTS 

Harry Hofmann 
Joseph Heinl & Sons 

JRNITURE STORES 

Peoples' Furniture Co. 
Andre & Andre 



GROCERS 

Economy Cash Market 

Leek's 

Jenkinson-Bode, Wholesale 

Piggly Wiggly 

J. H. Zell 

Vasconcellos 

Cully Coffee Co. 

HARDWARE STORES 

Brady Bros. 
HOTELS 

New Pacific Hotel 
The Dunlap 

JEWELERS 

Bassetts 

Schram & Buhrman 

Russell & Thompson 

MEAT MARKETS 

Wiegand 

Widmayer 

Dorwart's Cash Market 

MILLINERY 

H. J. Smith 
Miller Hat Shop 

MUSIC HOUSES 

J. Bart Johnson 
J. P. Brown 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Spieth's Studio 
Mollenbrok & McCullough 

PRINTING 

Courier Company 

Roach Press (East State St) 

Artcraft Printing Office 

RESTAURANTS 

Vickery's Colonial Inn 
Cafe Batz 
Loop Cafeteria 

SECOND HAND STORES 

Easley Second Hand Store 

SHOE SHOP AND REPAIRS 

L. L. Burton 
Jos Burgert 
Hopper & Son 
Mathis, Kamm & Shibe 
Jas. Mc Ginnis 
Edwin Smart Shoe Co. 

THEATERS 

Luttrell's Majestic Theater 

Scotts' 

Rialto 



Want 



MEMBER OF FLORIST 
TELEGRAPH DELIVER 
ASK US ABOUT IT 



Cut Flowers 



SAY IT WITH 
FLOWBRs 



FROM 
JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



People's Furniture Compai 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IIV 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

Telephone 59 229 E. State St. 




y& Always — 



COOVER < EAST 



FINEST TOILET ARTICLI 



DRUG CO. I S,DE 



FOR 



BRUSHES AND 
FANCY NOVELTIES 
Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT— 221-223 EAST STATE STRBJ 



Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 
OF FOOTWEAR FOR 
&*4-tfW YOUNG PEOPLE 

HOPPERS We shine 




shoes jx u jt r^ rj x^. £3 5/? oes 

On the Corner 

'or Those \Vno Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies* Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFNER 

I it's New— We Have It 10 WEST SIDE SQ. 



EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 



For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready-to-Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



The I 

Artcrart Pnntm 
Office 



213 WEST MORGAN I 

Telephone 400 

EMIL HARW] 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORK 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388 — Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 

Everything Musical 

49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 

GROCERY 

A good place to get good things 

to eat at a reasonable 

price 

EAST STATE STREET 



AT YOUR SERVICE 
FOR BETTER PICTURES BRI* 
YOUR FILMS TO US 

jlie Armstrong 

Drug Stor 

QUALITY STORES 

S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State 
Jacksonville, 111. 



ihankens 

Woman s 
ishionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
re will give you a better 
a as to what is new. 



W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 



322-324 East State Street 



$<i ^ooke Sfyoppe 



SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



'yinz Stationer? 
ati& 
(Sift Shop ttovettUs 



J. P. BROWN 

Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 



TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 



19 South Side Square 
Jacksonville 



lARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 



CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 
Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 
:e: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



H. J. SMITH 

MILLIINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 
LADIES' HOSIERY 

South Side Square 



Box of Fine Stationery 

Hammermill Bond 

250 Sheets of Paper and 250 Envelopes $2.2 

Roach Printing Office 

Opposite Post Office 

Prof. — "Don't you know the question?" 

Frosh— "Yes." 

Prof.— "Well, go ahead." 

Frosh — "But I don't know the answer." 

— M t. Union Dynamo 



BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN 


MXEBS 


Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 

45-47 South Side Square 


Exclusive Agents 
Hartman Wardrobe Trunk 
Complete Line Plana Bagjf 

Mannish 
Sweater Coat* 



C. S. Richards Miss Eza 

The Book and Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETING 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILL 



I still believe in and sell "QUALITY" foo 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 



Spietl) 5tu6io 

Photograph In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 

Portraiture 

S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

'Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 North Side Square 



Woman's College girls can always find a complel 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Totnlinson's Clothing Stor 

North Side Square 



C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

everything; in 
DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

EAST STATE STREET 



Dr. W. O. WAF 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEAS1 

Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Stre 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH' 

Made Clean Sold Clean 

EAT 

MORE 
BREAD 




IDEA 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us supply the eats for your next feed 



^ I) e <T o 1 1 e g e ©reelings 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

Acute Pcrsonitis 98 

The Open Meeting 99 

Observations of Ophelia 101 

Mr. Petterdon's First Sermon 103 

"Our Country is a Garden" 109 

Needed — Efficiency 1 1 o 

The Societies: A Problem 1 1 1 

Specials 114 

Jimmie at the Game 117 

A Promise 118 



Orje College (Breettngs 



ACUTE PERSONITIS 

I have often wondered how Noah felt during those seven 
months when he had to live with all of the animals that were 
ever created. The timid little earthworm, the arrogant lion; the 
bashful little squirrel, the forward skunk; the beautiful peacock, 
the homely owl; the graceful but treacherous snake gliding along 
its path, the awkward but good-hearted hippopotamus grunting 
and thumping along — all were there. Yes, all the forefathers of 
the generations to come were there, and Noah had, I suppose, to 
adjust himself to their moods and individual virtues. 

Every time I think of this world of ours, that fact — the 
fact that Noah had to go through a regular patience training 
school, comes to my mind. Each of us is a Noah, and at the 
same time, one of the animals in God's ark. We each have to 
put up with so many different kinds of specimens unlike us, and 
each and all of them have to put up with us. 

In this little world of ours you find the elephant with his 
striking personality, the gay little butterfly, the slow turtle, the 
sly fox, the proud rooster, the greedy wolf, the impertinent 
hyena, the loving doves, the self-sacrificing pelicans, and so forth. 
But — I wonder if Noah deserves, after all, as much credit as 
some of us? I wonder if he had to put up with any animal suf- 
fering from what I call "Acute Personitis" — a disease so com- 
mon in some of the human species. 

When trying to be nice and sociable, did he have to just sit 
on deck and listen to the heroic and sublime deeds of one of the 
members of his menagerie, or of one of its relatives? 

Can you swim a hundred yards?Why,s/?e could swim two 
hundred when just fifteen years old!Does your mother miss you? 
Oh, her mother simply can't live without her and wants her to 
come back home. Do you have a picture of a lovely and mag- 
nicent mountain? Oh, she wishes you could see the Rockies! 
When she was there — and then follows an endless array of de- 
tails. Have you a date? Oh dear! She was so busy she turned 
down two. 

98 



Obc College (Breetings 



And then her family! If you should remark that your 
father saw, in some museum, the socks which Washington wore 
when he became President, she is liable to tell you her father saw 
the sword with which Adam killed his mother-in-law! 

Well, if Noah had any such specie, I presume he threw it 
overboard and thus got rid of it, but we, the descendants, have 
to suppress our desires and to do our very best with a sickly smile 
and an occasional: "Well." — "Isn't that nterestng!" — "Well." 

"Oh, wasn't that nice!"— "My, did you ever!"— "Well " 

— Sarita. 



Diinnc 



THE OPEN MEETING 
Miss Mary Johnston recalls a neglected tradition. 

President Wilson of Princeton once said that a custom of 
four years' standing is established in the undergraduate mind as 
inviolable tradition. Similiarly one finds that a custom once 
discontinued passes into ancient history, a part of the past and 
totaJly dissociated from the present. One of the one-time tra- 
ditions, the lost customs, of the Woman's College is the Oper 
Society Meeting. The undergraduate of today has never seen 
one, and listens to accounts of them with the polite deference ac- 
corded to things of a dim and distant past. 

The Open Meeting! Dates were fixed far ahead. The pro- 
gram was planned and prepared for weeks and months in ad- 
vance. The thought was an incentive to higher standards of 
work on the weekly programs. Week by week the programs for 
the regular meetings were posted, read by the crowds passing in 
and out of the old chapel door, criticised, produced and discussed. 
"We had such an interesting paper" or "That was an exciting 
debate" was then a common enough remark at the Tuesday din- 
ner-table. Meantime, Sig and Phi held their regular meetings, 
open meetings, the Joint Debate. The night of an open meet- 
ing on The Hill an anxious society president has been seen dash- 

99 



Ol)£ College (Breetlngs 



ing through the corridors down here, ordering out her girls. "I 
can't help what you have to do, and I don't care! We've got to 
have a crowd out for those open meetings, or Sig and Phi won't 
come to ours!" So they went, to listen critically during the pro- 
gram and compliment their hosts politely as they left. 

On the appointed evening the chapel stage was set with the 
table belonging to the society, with the usual two chairs behind 
it. Two pianos were out, and the music stand in sight. The anx- 
ious ushers, youngest of their society, dressed in their best gowns, 
were moving up and down the aisles. The president was not 
yet in sight, but was watching the crowd assemble. Her own 
girls came in, in evening dress, to sit down in front. The prop- 
er formal invitations had been sent to the other societies down 
here and on The Hill. The other girls came out in force — they 
wanted a crowd for their own meetings later. Most of the fac- 
ulty were there. Dr. Harker of course was there, interested as us- 
ual in everything the girls did. Some faithful alumnae were 
out, and — yes,there came the boys, and the house was well filled. 
The boys sat strung out across the rear, except the few daring 
souls who went to sit down in front right and left of the center 
group. 

Eight o'clock. The president came out to take her place 
behind the table. Just behind her came the secretary. With 
this occasion in mind a handsome girl was always elected for re- 
cording secretary. The two were so pretty and so serious that 
the audience applauded. But the president rose sternly to pound 
the table with her gavel. "The meeting will please come to 
order!" It did. In due form the chaplain took charge of the 
devotional exercises. The minutes of the last open meeting were 
read and approved. Then the program really began. The 
president rose. "The secretary will call the first number on the 
program." The secretary rose. "Violin solo, Miss Blank." 
Miss Blank rose from her seat below. "Miss President." "Miss 
Blank, ladies and gentlemen." Miss Blank and her accompanist 
proceeded to the platform. Of course she was their star, musical- 

100 



, 



X5l)c (TolUge (Brcetincjs 



ly, and they had worked on this number for weeks. The pro- 
gram was clicked off neatly and smoothly. There might be no 
debate this time, perhaps, but their best writers had done essay, 
short story, poem and sketch. The best of their readers read 
her best selection. The last number was music again. At the 
last open meeting of the year before another society had put on 
a piano duet and a vocal trio. So now the secretary called four 
names. That was why two pianos were out! The eight-hand 
number was a grand success. In due form they voted to dis- 
pense with the business meeting, and the meeting was formally 
adjourned. The other presidents had been mentally reviewing 
or revising their programs, and even as all rose for the society 
song one was radiant with a sudden inspiration. She would have 
two girls put on a chalk-talk, a poem illustrated by cartoons! 
Everyone congratulated everyone else, and the open meeting was 
over. 

I 'TTTTTTI > 

OBSERVATIONS OF OPHELIA 

Won't some organization please publish an I. W. C. dorm- 
itory directory? After chasing clear to the end of Miss Miner's 
corridor after Dot Dean I find she has moved to third Harker. 
A list of new room-mate combinations with reasons for chang- 
ing would no doubt be appreciated by the persons concerned as 
well as their curious friends. 

"What is the college coming to?" shrieked the Atlantic 
Monthly and the National Geographic when the magazine stand 
was moved from its place in the center of the library to make 
room for reception furniture. "Never before in history — -" 
"Yes, once before," groaned the magazine stand as it was hauled 
away. "Make yourselves as heavy as possible my dears, so that 
this time will be the last." 

Wasn't the reception lovely? How strange it was to walk 
in evening dress down corridors, where one had that morning 
hooked up on the way to an eight o'clock class, and to see ferns 

101 



Xbfyz College (Greetings 



and a davenport where the garbage can had been. And everything 
went so smoothly, — my room-mate's cousin's friend did not 
send red roses, as I feared, but a delicate shade that blended with 
my yellow gown, and Miss R. S. V. P. and her mystified escort 
met without undue difficulty. 

Dr. Brummitt told us that a subscriber wrote to him de- 
manding that the Epworth Herald eliminate its jokes and use the 
space for prayer meeting testimonies. We hadn't thought of it 
before, but perhaps Greetings readers are similarly dissatisfied. 
Just tell Ophelia if you are, dears. She has a pull with the 
editor. 

Dixie Bly thinks that the reason more Freshmen than Sen- 
iors leave school to get married is because by the time they reach 
the last years "the marrying kind have been weeded out." Surely 
it is not the weeds that are first plucked! 

"What did Kipling and Dr. Brummitt say about broken 

dinner-knives?" challenged the Soph as she deftly mixed salad 

with a shoe-spoon. 

— Ophelia 
t ittttth > 

AT I. W. C. 

I pull at it and bruise my fingers. I put all my strength 
against it and still I am too weak. I coax, I rave, I talk to it. 
The time is passing — soon the last minute will be here and all 
my efforts will have been useless. Still, I will not give up! Un- 
mindful of my tired arms and failing breath I try again. No 
use — my skirt band will not meet. I have gained. 

—Vic. 



102 



I 



X31)* College (Greetings 



MR. PETTERDON'S FIRST SERMON. 

Young Mr. Pcttcrdon sat in his study, working on the 
logical sequence of the points in his sermon, — his first real ser- 
mon, in his first parish, for the next Sunday. Over his desk was 
a print of "Christ in the Temple". At his elbow was Ward's 
"Fundamentals of Doctrine". His Bible lay open at the concord- 
ance, where technical little markings tried to make logical order 
out of a beautiful chaos of thought. Mr. Petterdon looked the 
scholar as he knit his brows and set down his points on paper,I. 
a. b. c. (i), (2). Conscientiously he strove to clarify and build 
a solid case for his thesis, the necessity for unswerving righteous- 
ness. He would do this by telling the world plainly what the 
Bible said about Sin and its wages, Death. 

A most defiant "honk" broke in upon his pondering. Look- 
ing from the study window, he saw a motor truck jammed with 
merry-makers on their way to the country, bursting thru the 
sunshine of the quiet street. He knew the type by observation. 
They would come home at night, shrieking songs, men and 
women piled upon one another in half-drunken indifference. It 
was with real concern that Mr. Petterdon watched them whiz 
by. Then he prayed, earnestly, that he might bring such people 
to see the error of their ways, and lead them thru the acceptance 
of Christ to become holy. And the God he prayed to was an 
anxious-eyed God who gave sinners understanding thru punish- 
ment, and tried them with stern laws. 

He returned to sin in the abstract, and his sermon. He 
brought his arguments to the point, and piled evidence on evid- 
ence. It was a straight-forward talk, — he did not mention the 
boundless sea or the beauteous heavens during the course of it. 
He did not quote a poem at the end. But one versed in human 
nature, on reading the manuscript, could have seen the flaw. 

Mr. Petterdon's parents had had family prayer every even- 
ing; half of the prayer was for the heathen, one-fourth for civ- 
ilized sinners, and the remainder for the immediate family that 

103 



v. 



Ofye College (Greetings 



they might be spotless. Once in his youth Mr. Petterdon had 
"swiped" an apple, when on his way home from school. His 
conscience hurt him when he ate it. It hurt worse that night; 
by the next day the act had grown into a crime. He put a nickel 
in the farmer's mail box. He still felt stained. The scripture 
reading that night was about "whited sepulchres", or those who 
though outwardly rightoeus had hidden guilt. The boy went to 
the farmer and confessed. The fact that he was laughed at and 
given two apples did not lessen the great mental relief. 

At the age of eighteen he had gone to visit relatives in a 
near-by town. His young cousin "got him a date" with a 
young damsel of the neighborhood and they went buggy-riding. 
In those days one could jog cozily along in the dusk without the 
danger of being knocked off the road by a touring car. Mr. 
Petterdon was an absolute blank on the subject of women. The 
prospect of the "date" had dismayed him, but that was nothing 
compared to his horror when on reaching a quiet road his cousin 
in the front seat put his arm about his companion and gave her 
an emphatic kiss. It that was horror it was positive terror when 
his girl, a round-faced, crude little thing, snuggled close and gaz- 
ed at him coyly. He looked at her as one would a dirty child 
who got too friendly, and moved over to the edge of the seat. 
She was not desirable, it is true, being over-confident and smug, 
and odorous of cheap perfume. So the one path by which Mr. 
Petterdon might have escaped from his extreme righteousness 
was cut off by unfavorable circumstances. But even had the 
element of cheapness been eliminated from the situation, I doubt 
if he would have fallen — then. 

All of this history accounts for the fact that Mr. Petterdon 
was seeking to eradicate sin by denouncing sinners. He had never 
been one. 

It was the Friday night before the Sunday on which he 
would make his public denouncement of unrighteousness, and 
his debut into the clerical world. Mr. Petterdon dressed him- 
self carefully, not from personal pride, but to uphold the honor 

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Tb\)t College (Breetlngs 



of his profession, and betook himself to the home of Mrs. Black, 
the wife of a church pillar and the strength that upheld it, who 
was giving a reception for the new pastor. In spite of his con- 
scientious seriousness he made a good appearance as he stood be- 
side the hostess and greeted the guests. His hair was black and 
sleek; his head was well-shaped, coming down at the back in 
the curved line that betrays a sensitive refinement. His nose 
was straight — his eyes dark and severe. 

Mrs. Black was in her element. Beamingly she marshalled 
her guests by the guest of honor, who was playing his part no- 
bly in his first encounter with a receiving line. 

The Misses Carters, the inevitable old-maid sisters of any 
congregation, had just gushed by, and there was a lull. Mr. 
Petterdon raised his eyes. On the wide stairway stood a vision! 
The soft, silky whiteness of its gown gleamed against the dark 
stairs. The soft smooth whiteness of its hand rested lightly on 
the mahogany rail. The lustre of pearls shown in its dusky 
high-piled hair. Its lashes were black against its white cheek. 
There was an exquisite outline from firm chin down the grace- 
ful neck to bare white shoulder. The vision descended, one love- 
ly slippered foot floating after the other. Mr. Petterdon closed 
his eyes. He could feel it coming, and held his breath. 

Mrs. Black was saying his name. He opened his eyes, — 
he was gazing into two soft gray ones that were like a caress. 
"Mr.Petterdon,this is my dear friend from the East,"— the name 
he did not hear. His throat said something, and his mind told 
him after she had gone, that her hand was cool and soft and her 
lips were red — red — 

The evening passed. The new pastor conversed, nibbled 
Nabiscos, listened with appreciation to the little Griggs girl's 
trembly little violin solo. But the mind and spirit of Mr. Pet- 
terdon were in a tumult, for never before in his thirty serious 
years had he met a truly fascinating woman. She was standing 
in the dark doorway, — her skirt in the fashion of the year, was 

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Ol?c College (Brtttings 



short, her foot was tiny, — her ankles — the word "ankles", hith- 
erto very abstract and in vague bad repute in his mind, now 
sought to fit itself in with his vocabulary, — her ankles were 
— sweet ! 

That night a strange Mr. Petterdon laid him down to sleep, 
— one who had forgotten all about right and wrong and his ap- 
proaching crusade. All night long he was floating over valley, 
hill and stream, pursuing a vision with white limbs, red lips and 
dusky hair — 

In Mrs. Black's guest room the vision and her hostess were 
discussing the evening. 

"Does Mr. Petterdon always blush when he meets people?" 
asked the vision, winding the dusky hair on cruel-looking curl- 
ers. 

"I think, Gladys, that he was very much taken with you. 
Now dear, you are still a bit of a flirt, I know, but don't waste 
your time on Mr. Petterdon, because he is a very sober young 
man and no woman could make much of an impression on him." 
"Oh,"said the vision sweetly. But the caressing eyes twinkled 
as she screwed the last curler into place. 

Mr. Petterdon went mechanically thru his morning watch, 
then walked to his desk and picked up some papers lying there. 
She was from the East — what spot on earth was worthy of such 
a goddess? What was this he was fumbling with anyway — O 
yes — his sermon to be sure, his sermon for tomorrow — and she 
would some day return — yes, his first sermon — he must declaim 
it again; "My text this morning," said Mr. Petterdon to the 
study wall, "is Psalms 50: 22, — 'Now consider this, ye that 
forget God, lest I tear you in pieces.' " 

That night they sat on Mrs. Black's porch; Mrs. Black, 
with her cheerful, contented gossip, rocking violently in her fa- 
vorite chair, Mr. Petterdon on the steps, not lounging gracefully, 
but feet side by side, hands clasped, a humble worshipper of the 
vision, who reposed regally in a camp chair, gazing at the neo- 
phyte beneath dusky lashes. 



106 



Ol)£ College (Brcetings 



"Mrs. Black," spoke the goddess, "before I go home you 
must tell me the magic herbs you use in making lemonade. No 
one back East makes it as you do." 

This having the natural result of removing Mrs. Black to 
the kitchen to work with mint and lemon, the goddess looked at 
Mr. Petterdon and curved her lips in a slow, sweet smile. Two 
minutes later they were under the trees to see the moonlight thru 
the branches. She couldn't see him plainly enough on the porch 
to see if he were really stirred; she didn't really want him to 
yield completely, — just enough to know that if she wanted him 
to, he would, — just enough to be sure that she could still play 
her game: his profile was so stern, there in the moonlight. Per- 
haps he wasn't — if she could only see his eyes — 

Mr. Petterdon was bewildered. He wanted to look at her, 
but this strange tenseness made him turn away. She was coming 
up to him — she was there beside him, looking into his face — how 
unspeakably lovely, the whiteness and the sweet nearness of her, 
the tenderness of her lips — a strange Mr. Petterdon to the sur- 
prise of the old Mr. Petterdon reached out and took her in hi* 
arms. 

"You must — let me go," the vision gasped. The new Mr. 
Petterdon bent to her lips. "You fool," she said tensely, "I'm 
married. Let me go!" He jerked back. "See!" She held up her 
hand to show the plain gold band. 

A moment when time stopped. Then, — "I don't care!" 
cried Mr. Petterdon, and took one glorious kiss. Then he walk- 
ed straight out of the gate, down the street, and into the country. 
He sat down by the side of the road and remembered how it felt 
to kiss her. Then he closed his eyes and tried to forget all about 
himself by thinking of paving bricks and Wall street and other 
impersonal things. Then he opened his eyes and thought about 
himself again and it came rushing over him from the back of his 
mind where he had it all dammed up that he, a professor and 
teacher of The Law, had coveted his neighbor's wife. He 
thought of the morning and his sermon on righteousness, and 

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Ol)e College <B reelings 



got up and staggered down the road a bit. Then he lay down 
on the grass and buried his face in it and lay there for a long, 
long time. Toward morning a very pale Mr. Petterdon went 
home. 

The congregation gathered promptly that bright Sunday 
morn. There was an eager interest in the air. 

"Young Petterdon looks scared," said an usher to the pre- 
siding elder. "Not that I wouldn't be." 

The rather wan young pastor gave the prayer and an- 
nounced the hymns tremblingly. But when he stepped to the 
pulpit for the sermon he looked more calmly into the attentive 
faces. The firm, stern line of his mouth was gone, but in his 
eyes was a shy friendliness. "My text is Psalm 103, verses 15 
and 16." Then with a kindly confidence, " 'He knoweth our 
frame,' " read Mr. Petterdon. " 'He remembereth that we are 



dust.' " 



— Margaret Fowler. 
Pimm ) 



The simple and dignified letter of appeal read to us in 
chapel the other morning is a cause for thought. When one who 
was a member of our college family is in need of the fundament- 
als of life, — bread, meat, shoes, — with the income of 5000 
marks from his estate worth seven loaves of bread, because of the 
colossal wreck of his country, the trouble of Europe seems near. 
Something that the eye cannot see goes with the more substan- 
tial message from Jacksonville, Illinois to Professor Otto Soldon, 
Hellmundstrasse 38, Wiesbaden, Germany. 



rs\ 



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108 



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View Novth Albti^ijeabc. 



J3\)d College (Breetlngs 



"Our country is a Garden, but such gardens are not made 
By singing "Oh, how beautiful!" and sitting in the shade 
While better men than we go out and start their working lives 
At grubbing weeds from gravel paths with broken dinner knives. 



There's not a pair of legs so thin, there's not a head so thick, 
There's not a hand so weak and white, nor yet a heart so sick, 
But it can find some needful job that's crying to be done; 
For the Glory of the Garden glorifieth every one." 

From The Glory of the Garden. — Rudyard Kipling. 



109 



X3l)£ College (Breetings 



Vo/. XX VJ. Jacksonville, III., Feb., 1923 ATo. 5 



STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 

Associate Editor Eloise Calhoun 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 



NEEDED— EFFICIENCY 

Service! That's our motto! Shine? Shampoo? Sand- 
wiches? Dressmaking? Delivering? Doughnuts? Clean- 
ing? Curling? Candy? Everybody's working! Formerly fastid- 
ious females besmire themselves with shoe polish. Those who 
mometer stand around in awe waiting for a chance to shell nuts 
get on the Honor Roll but who perhaps never saw a candy ther- 
or fold boxes for their friends who talk so familiarly in cook- 
ing terms. I. W. C. is after Endowment! It is a great educational 
process, for an unquestionable purpose, and is, incidentally, fun 
because it is novel. 

And therein lies the danger. A college campaign must avoid 
being like a sky-rocket, that goes off in a flare of glory and fizzles 
down to a dead stick. 

There is enough energy, ability, and real devotion to our 
plans here to keep us humming with activity 'til we see the thing 
thru. Put yourself behind your particular endowment job 
with all your heart, yes, — but use your mind, too. Conserve 
your energy. All your time for endowment now means all your 
time for neglected lessons later. Effort, — steady, efficient effort! 
That will give us a glorious victory in June, 1923. 

110 



Z5l)c (Tollegc (Breetings 



THE SOCIETIES: A PROBLEM. 

An unnamed contributor revives an old problem from a 
new view-point. 

The Societies here in school claim the interest and curiosity 
of the new students more, perhaps,than any other organization. 
Yet we who are members of them realize how little reason they 
have to promote such interest. 

Doubtless they were started with firm purposes and strong 
ideals, altho both seem now to be irrevocably lost. I surmise 
that literary study and fellowship were prominent in those first 
aims, but at present there is only a passive interest in the former 
and the latter seems to be entirely lacking. There are oil and 
water personalities, as there are oil and water politics, and the 
two will not mix. Society does not promote congeniality, as 
it is taken for granted that it does. The greatest place for that 
is at the dinner table, and yet we all have spent many weeks at 
the table with some girls who, on account of the difference of 
their tastes and ideas, would never be more than acquaintances. 
Throwing people together will not necessarily make them friend- 

ly. 

The societies are now almost useless institutions. What is 
the remedy? We have been told that when there was rushing 
and unrestricted bidding many girls had their college lives 
marred and some even left school because they did not "make" a 
society; yet does one go home because one does not get on the 
Honor Roll? Surely personality should be put on the same 
basis as brains. Nor should it be a disgrace not to fit into a par- 
ticular group of people. The world would certainly be a 
monotonous place if we were all in the same crowd. Still, as 
this is a trait of human nature, it must be taken into account. 
The solution might be found in instilling strong purposes once 
more in the societies. We must take into consideration the fact 
that people cannot be banded together successfully unless they 
do have a purpose in mind. It may be only a social one or it 

111 



Td be College <£r<te tings 



may be a serious constructive one, yet the purpose must be there. 
In the case of the societies here, the purpose would not be social, 
for a social purpose is the outgrowth of fellowship, which we 
have not; rather it would be educational, perhaps on the order 
of the purposes of the women's literary clubs or drama leagues. 
The question now arises whether we want any more organiza- 
tions added to the list of those that we have already, for the so- 
cieties would become merely organizations in such a case. 

There is one more light in which the matter might be view- 
ed before we abandon it entirely: let the number of the societies 
be increased so as to correspond with the number of outstanding 
and individual groups in school. Then there will be society 
types and cliques, you say, which are evils to be guarded against. 
But are they evils? There will always be cliques. Girls of like 
tastes will always gravitate together. Why should it be more 
wrong that these groups be termed 'societies", than that they 
merely exist? The advantage would be three-fold: such societies 
composed of girls who would, under any circumstances, seek each 
other's company would be the strongest of ties between the stu- 
dents and the school; they would be internally congenial (which 
they are not now) ; and they would be outwardly useful (be- 
cause congeniality creates useful activity). 

Societies as they are now are admittedly a failure; as they 
were two years ago they were likewise unsuccessful. In this 
progressive age, failures are to be left behind, not carried into the 
future. Let us abandon societies or make them a success. 

— s. o. s. 

Do you agree? Silence gives consent. Put your opinion 
in the Greetings box for the March issue. 

Vivian DeWitt (to Grace Walker who is drumming on the 
piano this Saturday night) — ''Can you play 'Tomorrow'?" 
Grace — "No. I don't play on Sunday." 

112 



Z3l)e (TolUge (Greetings 



LOCALISMS 
T7?e persons mentioned are guaranteed guilty. 
Miss Abbott (illustrating construction in English comp.) 

" 'If the milk disagrees with the baby, boil it/What would that 

be?" 

Madeline Lowther — "Murder." 

Gladys Madden (in Psych.) — "Mrs. Weber, do you think 
people ever grow crazy worrying about things?" 

Mrs. Weber— "Why, yes." 

Gladys — "One time I worried until my head began to 
buzz." 

Mrs. Weber— "Well, did you stop?" 

"What language are you going to teach your children, 
Sarita? Spanish or English?" 

"Both. We'll talk Spanish in the day time and English 
at night — and we'll go to bed early." 

Freshman in sewing class — "The Industrial Revolution? 
What was it? Who won?" 

Dorothy Mae is reading her dietetics paper to Ruth Webb 
for the latter's education and enlightenment. Looking up, she 
catches Ruth in a yawn. 

"Can you understand it?" asks D. M. sternly. "I have just 
mentioned 'obesity'. Do you know what that is?" 

"It's what I'm not," replies Ruth. 

"Yes," says D. M. "You're the opposite. You're emanci- 
pated." 

( >TTTTTT< > 

There are jokes on the advertising pages — read them — 
and the adds too. 

113 



Olj* College (Greeting* 



SPECIALS 

The corridor phone had jingled ever so many times each 
day, and June who lived next door to it, ever conscientious, al- 
ways answered it if she were anywhere around. Very frequently 
the voice at the other end of the wire said, "Will you tell Mary 
Evans she has a special delivery letter?" 

Or sometimes it was Marion lies or Frances Percy who were 
so favored, and once in a while it was someone else, but never 
had it been June Black. Once or perhaps twice when she an- 
swered the phone, the voice had said, "Will you please tell June 
Black that she is wanted at the office?" but the thrills vanished 
when she found she was wanted to pay a music bill or get a book. 

In fact June had become so pessimistic over the subject of 
any good coming out of a telephone that she had resolved that, 
if ever she had a home of her own, a telephone would have no 
place in it. Furthermore, to avoid listening to its ring, so pleas- 
ant for some people, she adopted the practice of studying always 
in the library, far off from such disturbing noise. 

The subject of "specials" still bothered her. She frequently 
had to see them piled upon the desk in the office; and while she 
strove womanfully to keep her glance away, she couldn't help 
wondering if the girl in the office would some day say, "June, 
did you get your special?" 

The first weeks of school passed on into months and Christ- 
mas came without even one special to enliven the whole period. 
Why didn't her friends and relatives realize that they were col- 
lege necessities? 

On the eve of her return to college after the Christmas holi- 
days, she rose and thus addressed the gathering of friends and 
family who had dropped into the Black home for a final visit: 

"I have an ultimatum to make unto you. I like my college 
very much, and am quite willing to go back there and stay — up- 
on one condition — that occasionally some of you present me 

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Z3l)£ <£olUge (Greetings 



with a special delivery letter. I desire to be waked up on Sun- 
day morning with the pleasant news, 'You have a special. Shall 
I get it for you?' Now all of you remember: unless I receive 
what I desire by the end of this semester, I return unto you!" 

And the family agreed. "All right," they said, "We'll re- 
member." 

The first Sunday after the holidays, June woke early to lis- 
ten for the telephone's ring. Not that she was going to answer 
it herself, for then no one but her room-mate would know she 
had a special. But all day long she listened, and though the 
phone rang many times, there was no call for her. Her letter 
home that afternoon was a jumble of desires to be haughty and 
disdainful, and pleas of "Please send a special." All during the 
week her eyes strayed to the pile of "specials" upon the desk, but 
the pile always melted away into other people's hands. 

"O, what a family I have," she thought. "Do you suppose 
they don't want me to come back second semester?" — the awful 
idea left her dazed. "I'd no idea I might have to stop school, 
but I won't go back on my word," and June almost cried herself 
to sleep that night. 

Mother's letters during the week were as cheery and newsy 
as ever, but no mention was made of the special delivery letter, 
nor did Dad mention it when he sent a check. 

The end of the semester drew nearer, and the longed for 
letters did not arrive. Nightly tear baths did not agree with 
June's eyes or her disposition the next morning. 

"Did I ever desire to stop college?" she wondered. "Why 
it's the only place to be. And the family must expect me to 
come home or they'd send at least one letter. They didn't want 
me to come much last fall — would rather I had stayed at home 
this winter. Maybe they think if I don't care more about coming 
back than I do about a Special, I won't have to. But I want to!" 

And her room-mate groaned as she turned over in bed. 

It was Thursday of exam week and only two more days 

115 



^5l)c College <£ reelings 



until the end of the semester. Her mother and father had men- 
tioned neither coming home or staying. What should she do? 
After two early, fervent appeals, she had not said anything more 
to the family. What were they expecting her to do? The worry 
was not especially conducive to good examinations. 

That afternoon after the English History exam, and when 
only Math was left to be dreaded, June went for a stroll. Just 
as she was going out of the door she met Jean Blake, a Junior of 
whom she stood much in awe, and with whom she had 
little communication, except to return laundry which was in- 
variably mixed with hers. They started down the streer to- 
gether, chatting about the usual things, — exams, between semest- 
er recess, and home. 

"You know," Jean said, "I've been getting the queerest 
specials from home the last few weeks. Whoever wrote 'em 
would usually say, 'I haven't ti^e to write much, bur hope just 
the special will satisfy you.' I couldn't make out the post- 
mark, but I'm sure it wasn't from home." 

June breathed a deep sigh. "I wish the folks would send me 
a special sometime, but I guess the St. Ann post office doesn't 
sell special delivery stamps or know what they mean." 

"Do you live at St. Ann?" Jean demanded. "That's what 
the postmark on my letters looked like, but I'd never heard of 
the place, and wasn't sure. Maybe those letters are yours! Here's 
the last one I got." 

June breathed a deep breath of gladness — It was hers II 

"I thought the writing didn't look just like mother's but 
she runs her letters together so queerly one can hardly read them," 
Jean remarked casually, unmindful of the effect of the letter on 
June. "I heard you weren't coming back next semester. You 
are, aren't you?" 

"Am I?" June forgot her awe of the Junior. "Say, wild 
horses couldn't keep me away!" 

— Alma Blodget 

116 






Td\)<l College i&reetings 



JIMMIE AT THE BASKET BALL GAME 

Jimmie, aged seven, was leaning over the rail in the I. W. 
C. gym. He was visiting his sister Nancy, and, though he had 
been until the present moment awed into silence by the prepon- 
derance of females (with the elevator as his only consolation), it 
was now necessary for sister to clutch his coat to keep him from 
pitching head-long into the inter-class finals. 

"Say, Sis, who are those two girls in the white ring? Why 
does one look so mad at the other?" 

"The other always gets the toss-up, Jimmie. Do sit still." 

"Why does the big one get the toss-up?" 

"She's taller." 

"Why doesn't shorty get her a chair to stand on. O, look 
at that girl on the line. Why does she try not to fall over 
the line?" 

"Because she's a side-center." 

"Why do they call her a side when she tries so hard to stay 
in the middle? — Haw! Haw! Haw! that fat girl fell down. Haw! 
Haw! — why can't I laugh? It's funny. Say, is that your 
room-mate try in' to get the ball? Lookee that girl wavin' her 
hands in front of your room-mate when she's tryin' to get the 
ball. Why doesn't your room-mate slap that girl for botherin' 
her so? O lookee, lookee, she's got the ball, your room-mate has! 
She's throwin' it at the basket! Aw — it didn't go in." (Deep dis- 
gust.) "Get it! Get it! O gee, she's got it again. Aw sis, leggo. 
I won't fall. Put 'er in! Put 'er in. Horray! she did!! Horray 
for our side!! Ra! Ra! Ra! — Sis, WILL you leggo my coat- 
tail?" 

I HTTTTtt > 

Uncle — "I hear you are going to school now." 
Bobbie— "Yes sir." 

Uncle — "What part do you like best?" 
Bobbie — "Comin' home." 

— Mt. Union Dynamo. 

117 



X5^e College (Breetlngs 



A PROMISE 

I have always been fond of the colored people, particularly 
the women and the children. Their funny way of expressing 
themselves, their whole-heartedness, and their endless imitation 
of white people interest me. Down in Birmingham, Alabama, 
two summers ago, Mary, of the real southern "mammy" type, 
used to come up to our room in the hotel to get our clothes. 

When she returned with them she would proudly place her 
bundle on the bed, carefully remove the pins which held the 
newspaper, and disclose the garments. You may imagine my 
surprise the first time on finding that she had scattered talcum 
over the handkerchiefs. That was evidently her idea of "the fin- 
ishing touch". 

Mary and I became fast friends. It was my special delight 
to get her to talking about herself- The following conversation 
took place one evening: 

"Miss Alice, I sho' do like to wash yo' close. Dey's got such 
a good odah and looks so nice when dey's clean and ironed. And 
dey've got de best smell anyway. What kind of perfume dos 
yo' use, honey?" 

"LaTrefle. Here, I'll put a few drops on you."And I sprayed 
a little over her dress and hair. She sniffed so hard that I feared 
for the membranes of her nostrils. 

"By de way, Miss Alice, I was gwin' to say that if you all's 
got any close you all don't want to carry back up no'th with you 
I could use 'em. The ladies I wash for has always been so good 
to give me close. I rarely evah buys 'em myself." 

I explained that having come only for a two weeks vacation 
I had nothing but necessities with me. Then to produce further 
conversation I asked, "Have you a husband, Mary?" 

"Yes'm, I'se got a husband." 

"Do you get along well together?" 

"Yes'm, only he gets kind of feverish sometimes." 

118 



T5\)& College (Breetlngs 



"Feverish?" I asked, not quite comprehending her mean- 
ing. 

"Yes'm, feverish." 

Her brow was begining to wrinkle in puzzled lines when 
my mother who had been listening said, "I guess you mean 
'peevish,' don't you, Mary?" 

"Oh, yes'm, dat's the word. I done heard de white folks 
use it once an' I guess I disremembered it." 

I could scarcely keep from laughing and I guess she perceived 
my mirth for she looked reprovingly at me and, shaking her 
finger, said, "Now, Miss Alice, don't you all go and tell de 
white folks up no'th dat I said dat. Now promise you won't." 
And I promised. 

— Alice Bar wise, '24 

1 mnm \ 

WITH THE CAMPUS JOKESTERS 

A psychiatric board was testing the mentality of a negro 
soldier. 

"Do you ever hear voices without being able to tell who is 
speaking or where the sound comes from?" 

"Yes, suh," answered the negro. 

"And when does this occur?" 

"When I'se talkin' over de telephone." 

— Central We$leyan Star. 

t >TTTTTT< > 

Soph. — "Who is that old peddler over there?" 
Senior — "Oh, that's an Economics Prof who took a flier 
in Wall St." — DePauw Daily. 

i >TTTTTT< > 

"It's a shame doc, to call you 

So far from your happy home." 
"Never mind, man, your neighbor is sick. 
I can kill two birds with one stone." 

Southern California Trojan 
119 



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ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. F. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 




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H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
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M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-Presi dent H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

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CAFE CONFECTIONERY 



For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Our Fountain 

CATERING SODA 

! ; ; 

Electrical Suggestions for tne Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELER'S FANS 

JACKSONVILLE Ry. & LIGHT CO. 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

3. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

\ E. Farrell, Vice-President E - E - Crabtree 

■'. A. Chapin, Vice-President £ || ^rell 

L W. Osborne, Cashier j.' g.' Hackett 

ess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 



The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

ILBERTS DRUG STORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 



Cully Coffee Company 

The Home of Good Coffee 

PHONE 268 222 WEST STATE ST. 

Everything in Dry Goods and 
Millinery 

*•{?•- FLORETH'S *-£■" 

Trade West Side Dry Goods Co. Trade 

Widmayer's High Grade Meats, Eh 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 
W. F. Widmaycr C. E. Segn 



Teacher — "Your themes should be written so that even the 
most stupid of people can understand them." 

Pupil — "Yes ma'am. What part don't you understand?" 
— West Virginia Wesleyan Phatot. 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



The Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the Hour 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARi 



THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

>IGGLY WIGGLY STORES 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 
74 S. SIDE SQ. 



Buckthorpe Brothers 

Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 

Schram & Buhrman 
Jewelers 

OTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



Wiegand /Vlarket 

2.2.4 E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 



Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 

Quality and Service our Motto 



"The Home of Crispette" 

The Sanitary 

Pop-corn and 
Crispette Shop 

Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



\ 



A GOOD PLACE TO EA1 

Loop Cafeteria at 
Cafe 



POPULAR PRICES 






WEST MORGAN STREE 



Teacher — "When was the revival of learning?" 

Pupil — "Just before exams." — Phteno Cosmian 



COME TO- 



FLORETHS 

For Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coa 



Cosgriff's Coffee and Waffle 

Shop 



FAMOUS 



OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 



WAFFLES 






WEST STATE STRE! 



Jos. Burgert 

Dealer in 

G oo d Shoes 



No. 26 

North Side of Square 



DORWARTS 

Cask Market 

CHOICE MEAT! 

OF ALL KINDS 

Both Phones 196 
No. 230 WEST STATE STREJ 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lame^ Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 



It's Well Worth Considering 



Fancy Box Stationery 
Address Books 

13 W. STATE ST. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 



Program Pencils 
MVanl Gold and Silver 
Eversnarp Pencils 

W. B. Rogers 



Use Brazola Coffee 

Sold by 

Jenkinson-Bode Co. 

Coffee Roasters and 

Wholesale Grocers 



Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
EVENING COURIER 

For Today's News 



FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
Catalogues, Pamphlets, Letter- 
Heads, etc., at lowest prices. 



WOMAN'S FURS 

he styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

?RANK BYRNS ha s t TO re 



c o no my Grocery 



Quality — Courtesy — Service 

East State Street 



PURE FOODS 

Illnois Phone 49 






YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN- 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 1 

FOR THEMSELVES 



Mollenbrok fe? McCullough 



Vicker?'s 
.♦.Colonial ~3nn... 

The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Rece 

tions and Luncheons 

We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any qua 

tity. We also serve dinners,when reservation is made 

advance. 

J 1213 WEST STATE STREET 

Illinois Telephone 93 Bell Telephone I 




Andre & Andre 

Everything 

to completely furnish 

the home 

Wallace-Nutting Pictures 

Quality, Service, Satisfaction 

The Best Place to Trade, after all. 



If you want a thing of good report 

Go to the men who the "Greetings" support. 



Smith Federal 
Bakery 



Cleanliness 
is your buy word 

Quality 

is our watch-word 



T . J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
popular fancies of Late Fashion, always featuring the 
youthful lines so becoming, displayed daily in our Ready- 
to-Wear Section. 

presses Coats Suits Skirts Furs 
Negligees Silk Underwear Blouses Lingerie 

. J. Waddell & Company 



I^OU will be pleased with our fine line of 
Jewelry and Silverwear 

Gifts Tkat Please . . . 

j RUSSELL & THOMPSON 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BURTON 



Tie Home of Better 
Shoe Repairing 

!» WEST MORGAN STREET 



Flash Lights 

and 

Batteries 

PETERSON BROS, 

320 E. State St. 




Muslo Hall 
Erected 1906 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1900 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle 
West, in a beautiful, dignified, old college town, noted 
for its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are looking 
for a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS 

n n n n 



BAKERIES 

Ideal Baking Co. 
Smith Federal Bakery 

BANKS 

Ayers National Bank 
Farrell State Bank 

BOOK STORES— OFFICE SUP'S 

Lane's 

W. B. Rogers 

Book and Novelty Shop 

Ye Booke Shoppe 

CLOTHING STORES 

Frank Byrns' Hat Store 
Myers' Bros. 
Tom Duffner 
Tomlinson 

CONFECTIONERS 

W. S. Ehnie & Bro. 
Bonansinga 
Princess Candy Co. 
Peacock Inn 
Crispette Shop 
Mullenix & Hamilton 
Merrigan 

DOCTORS 

Dr. W. 0. Wait 

DRUG STORES 

Armstorog Drug Stores 
Coover Drug Co. 
Gilbert's Drug Stores 

DRY GOODS. READY-TO-WEAR 

C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Floreth's (East Side) 

Floreth's (West Side) 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Co. 

Rabjohn & Reid 

Shanken's 

F. J. Waddell 

DYEING AND CLEANING 

A. E. Schoedsack 
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 

Jacksonville Ry and Light Co. 
Walsh Electric Co. 
Peterson Bros. 

FLORISTS 

Harry Hofmann 
Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FURNITURE STORES 

Peoples' Furniture Co. 
Andre & Andre 



GROCERS 

Economy Cash Market 

Leek's 

Jenkinson-Bode, Wholesale 

Piggly Wiggly 

J. H. Zell 

Vasconcellos 

Cully Coffee Co. 

HARDWARE STORES 

Brady Bros. 
HOTELS 

New Pacific Hotel 
The Dunlap 

JEWELERS 

Bassetts 

Schram & Buhrman 

Russell & Thompson 

MEAT MARKETS 

Wiegand 

Widmayer 

Dorwart's Cash Market 

MILLINERY 

H. J. Smith 
Miller Hat Shop 

MUSIC HOUSES 

J. Bart Johnson 
J. P. Brown 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Spieth's Studio 
Mollenbrok & McCullough 

PRINTING 

Courier Company 

Roach Press (East State St) 

Artcraft Printing Office 

RESTAURANTS 

Vickery's Colonial Inn 
Cafe Batz 
Loop Cafeteria 

SECOND HAND STORES 

Easley Second Hand Store 

SHOE SHOP AND REPAIRS 

L. L. Burton 
Jos Burgert 
Hopper & Son 
Mathis, Kamm & Shibe 
Jas. Mc Ginnis 
Edwin Smart Shoe Co. 

THEATERS 

Luttrell's Majestic Theater 

Scotts' 

Rialto 






Box of Fine Stationery 

Hammermill Bond 

250 Sheets of Paper and 250 Envelopes $2.25 

Roach Printing Office 

Opposite Post Office 



BRADY BROS 

EVERYTHING IN 

Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 

45-47 South Side Square 



MXEB? 

Exclusive Agents 

Hartman w'ararobe Trunks 

Complete Line Hand Baggage 

Mannish 
Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ezard 

The Book ana Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETINGS 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILLE 

Istill believe in and sell "QUALITY" foot- 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

INew/ Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 



Spietl) Stu6io 

Photograph In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 

Portraiture 

S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

"Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 North Side Square 



} 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready-to-Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



The 

Artcrart Printing 

Office 

213 WEST MORGAN ST. 

Telepkone 400 

EMIL HARWEY 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORKS 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388— Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 

Everything Musical 

49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 

GROCERY 

A good place to get good things 

to eat at a reasonable 

price 

EAST STATE STREET 



AT YOUR SERVICE 

FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 

YOUR FILMS TO US 

The Armstrong 

Drug Stores 

QUALITY STORES 

S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State St. 
Jacksonville, 111. 



Shankens 

Woman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
store will give you a better 
idea as to what is new. 



W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 



322-324 East State Street 



$?e 3£ooke Sljoppe 



SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



"jFine Stationery 

anb 

Gift Sbop Novelties 



J. P. BROWN 

Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 



TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 



19 South Side Square 

Jacksonville 



HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 



H. J. 



ITH 



CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



MILLINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 

LADIES' HOSIERY 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 



T17^ * 4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

W cUlL TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 

FLOWER FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IN 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

Telephone 59 229 E. State St. 




%) Always — 



i FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

SSiiX^X s'd S e T FOR BRUSHES AND 

DRUe CO - FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT— 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 

OF FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

We Repair -w^w g^± np* Tp* -wj\ Tp* *r^ We shine 
Shoes XJL V^r MT MT Hi XC ^ Shoes 

On the Corner 

For Those Who Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies* Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFNER 

// it's New— We Have It io WEST SIDE SQ. 

EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 



\ 



Woman's College girls can always findacomplet e 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Tomlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

everything; in 
DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

NORTH MAIN STREET 



Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 



Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH 

Made Clean Soldi Clean 

EAT 

MORE 

BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us supply the eats for your next feed 



Z3 I) e College (Greetings 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

Hands 120 

Greetings 1 2 1 

Moon Sketches 121 

To a Self-Sufficient Young Man 122 

Serenades from the Outside 123 

To My Dear L. B. 124 

Brothers 125 

Two Spring Poems 128 

Of Daytes 130 

Societies — A Failure? 132 

Contest Results 133 

A Night of It 134 

The Gorillas Win 137 

A Word to Would-Be Writers 138 

The Masculine Element at I. W. C. 140 

Observations of Oscar 141 



75\)t College <£r*etlngs 



HANDS. 

By Dorothy Dieman — first place in Poetry Contest. 

Everywhere hands stretch out to me: 

Numberless hands, 

And behind them — from the void — voices beg 

"Come play with us." 

Strong hands and tender hands are there, 

Artistic hands with long slender fingers, 

And hands accustomed to thumbing pages, 

Numberless hands which seem to call: 

"Come, come with us — 

Thru the fields that lie white under the first snow: 

Into the halls where music swells and quivers into silence; 

Within the books of love and romance: 

Down the great highway of adventure." 

I cannot decide. 

I would clasp them all. 

But I have only my two hands. 

I cannot decide. 



I have waited too long; 
The hands are gone. 
I am old. 



120 



Obe College (Greetings 



GREETINGS 

By Fannie E. Wakeley — second Honorable Mention 

I sent my heart asailing 

On the sea of time and space, 
In the little ship called Memory 

Sped by God's winds of grace. 
I put aboard as lading 

My love so strong and true, 
And a host of Easter greetings 

Each one addressed to you. 



Dnnnc 






MOON SKETCHES 

(The last two of a group of four by Audrey King) 
Second Place 

The moon is a lovely lip 
Which curves in a smile. 
It is a silver lip 
Over which passes a breath 
Silvered in the passing. 

Wealth! Wealth about me! 

This silver dust that fills the air. 

Enough to fill my coffers. 

Enough to please my soul. 

I cannot grasp it. 

It fills the air. 

Why are they empty, my hands! 

Empty of silver! 

How cruel! 

'Tis the moon mocking. 



121 




* 



TO A SELF-SUFFICIENT YOUNG MAN. 
On Passing Him on the Street 
I think that I admire you so because you seem so free. 
You swing along, you wear your clothes with such a jaunty air. 
It's what you think of me, not / of you, for which you care. 
I wish that I could half so careless be. 

It "fusses" me to have you stare so quite appraisingly, 
But a saving little doubt with me abides. 
This seeming unconcern of yours, — it's possible it hides 
"I wonder what she's thinking now of me?" 



122 



Orje (TolUge iBrcetings 






SERENADES FROM THE OUTSIDE 

To the Editor-ess, 
College Greetings: 

Your request, the other evening, for a contribution to the 
Greetings, almost completely floored me; however, when I re- 
covered from the shock, I was sensible of the great honor done 
one so unused to the ways of the world as I. 

Of course, a serenade, as seen from the outside, (heard 
would suit the case better!) — would be a novelty to most of you 
girls, but as this is a subject with which I must confess my 
familiarity, I gladly comply with your request, although you 
may wish you had asked me demonstrate, rather than write. 

To begin with, a serenade sounds best to us when accom- 
panied by the patter of many hands. We appreciate the moral 
courage of those who bear with us in order to gratify this long- 
ing of ours, all of which reminds me of the last time "we" were 
down. There were two of us who braved the Jacksonville 
Police Force — yes, both of them, to the extent of stopping 
en route to play to the Lady on the Monument, but finding her 
unresponsive, we left her in peace. As it was early Sunday 
morning we didn't stay very long, but we enjoyed ourselves, 
nevertheless. 

Being human, we naturally enjoy a midnight lunch, and 
candy goes mighty well, no matter when it is served, but the 
thought that you have missed us warms us like hot tamales on 
a winter night. Why haven't we been heard from lately? Well, 
it is not good for our instruments to be taken out in the rain, 
but Spring is here at last, and we'll be around again when it 
gets a little warmer, because we enjoy serenading,and appreciate 
the sweet things dropped from the windows, whether they are 
boxed or spoken. You notice I said "sweet things", — it was 
a great shock to some of us to find that girls throw water, but 
as I was under the arch it didn't cost me anything to learn. 

123 



I3l)e College (Greeting* 



Shoes! — well, French heels will do damage if carefully aimed, 
so if you promise to keep things where they belong, we'll be 
back soon. 

Yours in the interest of Soothing Serenades, — 

— Roger W. Carter. 

( mnncz^ 

TO MY DEAR L. B. 

(A Love Sonnet) 

'Twas such a day as this on which we met, 
And I had hoped to be his friend for aye, 
So well together did we work and play; 
Oh! that this love had kept alive! and yet 
Me oft consoled my feelings when I'd fret, 
Such words of love and truth to me he'd say. 
Yet I could answer naught but always, "Nay". 
Great Caesar! him I wish I'd never met. 
As in the swing he sat for many an hour 
To me he'd talk, yet I could not conceive 
How slowly were the hours passing by, 
Some on the porch and some in garden bower. 
Ah, many a hard look did he receive! 
Such times we've had, my Latin Book and I. 

— Leah Griest. 

( nmnt ) 

At the reception — "Miss Madden, may I introduce Mr. 
Rubendall?" 

"How do you do, Mr. Dall," 
"I'm glad to meet you, Miss Mad." 



Editor — "This is a good joke; do you think they will get 
the point?" 

Alma — "They ought to. You do." 

124 



Or>£ Collage Greetings 






BROTHERS. 

Brothers are interesting specimens. I have six of my own, 
some older and some younger than myself. But, since I can't 
go home very frequently, I like to watch the brothers of my 
friends whom I go to visit, and see how much they are like mine. 

There is of course, the little brother. He's interesting be- 
cause he is little and cute, but a girl at that age would be just 
as attractive. More interesting is the brother about twelve or 
thirteen. When I go home with his sister Maude she prepares 
me for a not very warm reception. 

"Mother says she'll try to keep Bud out of our way, but 
he'll probably be there anyway. He wants to know why under 
the sun I'm bringing home another one of those females from 
that Woman's College. I'm bad enough myself. It'll be awful 
if there is another girl hanging around." 

I go quite prepared; — my brothers of that age display the 
same spirit toward my guests. 

We arrive at Maud's to find dinner waiting us. The family 
greet Maude affectionately and make me quite at home, — all but 
Bud, who doesn't appear. Finally Maude drags him in. 

"Sue, I'd like you to meet my brother Bud." 

"How d'ye do," he says, sticking as close to the door as 
possible. 

I nod at him and reply, "I'm glad to know you. Maud's 
been telling me about you." 

"Say, I could tell you lots about her if I had a chance." A 
reproving look from his mother partly stops him. "Well, can't 
we have dinner now?" 

"Why yes, as soon as the girls are ready." 

In the dining rom, Bud busies himself with his food, and 
when he thinks he isn't being watched, he observes me. I am 
properly sized up, and I know the estimation is not very high. 
He makes few additions to the conversation, and the meal ends 
peacably. Maude and I help with the dishes and visit with 
the feminine members of the household, while Bud wanders to 

125 



Ohe College (Brewings 



the living room and starts the family radio. There is a knock 
at the door and Bud answers it. He admits two young men, 
and then turning kitchenward yells, "Here's you beau, Sis, and 
Tommy Brown for that girl." 

Having existed thru Saturday evening without further re- 
proof from his mother, Bud breathes easier on Sunday morning. 
He asks all sorts of embarrassing questions and makes remarks 
likewise uncomforting to his sister. He is not addressing me; — I 
may as well not be there for all the attention he seems to give 
me, but I know he is talking for my benefit. Finally, to the great 
relief of Maude, her father puts down his paper. 

"Bud, you've talked enough." 

And Bud meanders to the radio. Soon father departs for 
more quiet regions and Maude leaves. Bud and I are left alone. 
When he realizes the situation he too tries to escape, but I stop 
him. "How far can you hear on your radio?" 

"O, we can hear Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Omaha, 
and once in a while we get Schenectady." 

He is moving toward the door. Unnoticing this, I go on, 
"That's further than my brother Ralph gets with his set now. 
He wants to add something so that he can hear further, how- 
ever." 

"What sort of a set is his?" (Thank heavens he doesn't 
wait for an answer!) "If it's a crystal set like mine, he can get 

I try to look intellligent, while he explains very lucidly, 
no doubt to him, all the whys and wherefores of a radio set. I 
hope I look intelligent, for I know that by my bearing in this 
crisis am I made or lost in Bud's opinion. Finally, he explains 
it all ( — I guess, for I have been long lost — ) and goes on to 
some other topic. I breathe easier. Perhaps I have made a good 
impression. But no further indications do I have of it until 
time for us to depart. Bud comes to see us off; and when I tell 
him good-bye, he says, "I wish you'd come see Maude again. I 
wouldn't mind having her around if she were more like you." 

126 



k 



Ob* College (BrecUn$s 



Yes, they all say that, my brothers as well as yours. Isn't it 
a shame that they don't appreciate their own sisters more? 

Then there is the brother ten or twelve years older than 
Bud. He's the one that has been described to me until I think 
he must be a god. But without being told, I know that when 
Peg's mother told him Peg was taking me home with her, that 
he said, "Good Lord, can't Sis leave a fellow alone? One would 
think all I was good for was to be nice to her friends. Well, 
she need'nt expect to see me Saturday night. I've got a date." 

Brother Dick meets us at the station, delivers us at the 
house, and disappears for the rest of the evening. The next 
morning the family straggles down to breakfast. Dick is last; 
and finally apears after mad stepping around upstairs and slam- 
ming of doors. He slides into his place with a "Pardon me", 
and then he looks me over. I hope I have my nose properly 
powdered, and that all the curl isn't out of my hair; and then 
I wonder why, for I know he thinks I'm only one of those little 
fools from the Woman's College. 

Once in a while he forgets to be patronizing, and I feel 
that perhaps he thinks of me as a somebody, not a thing in the 
way. But no, those moments pass, and when I depart, while 
he says, "I hope you come again," I know he is thinking, "Hap- 
py day, she's gone!" 

I know too that he whispers in his sister's ear as he seems 
to bid her an affectionate farewell. "Sis don't bring home an- 
other girl soon. Margie's sore at me already because she sees 
me with so many of your friends. She thinks I have something 
to do with bringing them here. Heaven forbid." 

Sue doesn't tell me this, but I can imagine from her ex- 
pression, and his of "having done my duty", and I recall what 
Bob used to say to me when I took a girl home. Brothers are 
all alike. — Alma Blodget. 

t >TTHTT( > 

In our Latin America class; A llama is an animal between 
a camel and a sheep. 

127 



T5fyt College (Breetlngs 



^wo Spring 'jpoems 





By Miriam McOmbet, '22 

March 

I'm on a hilltop, in March, 
I'm exalted, I'm wind swept, I'm free! 
The heavens above make an arch 
Of unlimited distance to me. 

The winds tear the clouds, fury bent, 
Trees stagger and moan like the sea, 
But I dare this mad March 'til its spent, 
And I — I laugh in sheer glee. 

Let the fury winds tug at my skirts! 
Let them buffet me — pull me about — 
Let the wind take my breath 'til it hurts, 
'Til the pain of it makes me cry out! 

I'll stay on a hill top in March, — 

I'll bathe in its clear stinging wine 

'Til my heart which the sins of earth parch 

Has been cooled — and healing is mine. 



128 



^>l)c College (Greetings 



April. 

The world is gold, — perfumed. 

The rain clouds lifted for a day, and all the world 

Burst with the sweet of escaped spring. 

Birds twittered, 

Pirouetted on the swaying branches 

Or splashed chattering 

In the gold-filled pools of the muddy roads. 

Grass, flowers, leaves 

Pushed eagerly out of their wintery bonds. 

Men, women, boys and girls 

Are filled with the wild intoxication that nature has aroused. 

The world is drunk with the perfume of April — 

That blue and gold, mocking, dew-eyed maiden, April. 

More blindly than those who followed the Piper of Hamelin 

Does the world follow April through this day 

Recklessly — breathlessly. 

No one sees the low line of glowering clouds in the south. 

They wait patiently but jealously. 

Perfume and gold shall have their day. 

Smiling mocking April keeps the secret 

From shining in her eyes. 

At last 

The sunset pales, the gold is tarnished; 

And impatient at their delay, 

The storm clouds rise, careering, 

And as the Hun 

Creep unsuspecting on the innocent glad world. 

April has betrayed her love. 



129 



ot)e College (Breedings 



OF DAYTES 

A man hath great freedom. For, when he desireth the 
companie of a woman, he must needs only first look 
with the utmost care into his purse, to determine 
if the necessarie riches are there wherewith to pur- 
chase choice foods and gayety. Then, if it seemeth to him not 
sufficient for the expence, he must be at great paine to borrow 
from some friend who is a man of vertue and will not therefore 
practice usury. Then he betaketh himself to the telephone, 
and asketh of Central the number with all due humility, where- 
on, after tempus hath exceedingly fugited, he heareth the gentle 
tones of the maiden. But on the contrairie, a woman, inquiring 
oft and with due diligence at the office if perchance there may 
be a phone call for her, is able only to hope and wait with great 
anxietude, as it befitteth not her modesty to give evidence of 
boldnesse or a desire for a dayte. Though in truth, when she 
is at last in his companie, she beareth in mind the words of 
Solomon, He who can complete one dayte without allowing 
himself to be caught for another, that man is fitted to rule a 
kingdome. 

( >TTTTTT< > 

ONCE MORE. 

We'd be glad to let the question of high grades alone since 
receiving our last report card, but people keep pestering us about 
it, so back to the colors, — though again we remind you that 
we did not write the original article. This time the Divernon 
High School paper says that our criticism of grades has shatter- 
ed their young illusions in regard to the ability of faculty mem- 
bers to estimate the students' work. We will tell them imme- 
diately of a statement which Miss Johnston showed us in her 
Indiana Alumnus; of the 2000 students enrolled in the College 
of Arts and Sciences last year, only 20 were able to do straight 
"A" work the first semester. How many high schools and col- 
leges will that percentage fit? 

130 



Ol)e College (Breedings 



Vo/. XX VI. Jacksonville, III, Match, 1923 No. 5 

STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 
Associate Editor 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 



SOCIETIES— A FAILURE? 

It seems peculiar that some of our number who are impa- 
tient with the present society system in the Woman's College 
should spend their time in criticizing this system rather than in 
remedying in their own societies the conditions which are so 
distasteful to them. The present system, we all admit, is not 
entirely satisfactory, but far from being entirely a failure, it 
certainly does not deserve any remarks such as appeared in the 
article of last month's Greetings, "Let us abandon societies or 
make them a success". 

Success in the sense used in this quotation is success in a 
narrow sense only. When cliques of girls organize and deter- 
mine to to stick to "their type", the result is not success but a 
very selfish attitude and an immense egotism. No "type" is suf- 
ficient unto itself. A crowd of congenial people is a very pleas- 
ant thing, but the people will not remain congenial unless each 
member comes into contact with outside people, of different 
ideas, and so is broadened. 

The beauty of the present system lies in the variety of types 
with a common interest. If the old "society" spirit is passing, a 
better one of achievement and friendliness is taking its place. If 
any society feels itself failing, the trouble lies in the society and 

132 



Ob* College Greetings 



not in the system. If its members are not big enough to over- 
come petty personal feelings until a more satisfactory system 
can be found, that society deserves to fail. The story of the 
King's son who, seizing the sword which a quitter had thrown 
down, fought his way to victory, illustrates the point very well. 
Let those who can see absolutely no use in continuing societies 
unless they can be "cliques", stand aside, poor dears. There are 
other members equally fastidious, who find it possible to work 
peacefully and pleasantly and effectively with people who may 
differ from themselves somewhat, in looks, resources, tastes, — 

in a word, in "type". — A Contributor. 

t mrrm > 

CONTEST RESULTS 

The Freshmen took all places in the Short Story Contest, 
but upper-class girls seem to express themselves in poetry. 

Short Story Results — Eleven submitted. 
Father Prescribes by Mary McMillan, first place. 
An Interrupted Deal by Birdie Arbuthnot, second place. 
Mary Jane by Claude Craigmiles, first honorable mention. 
Dream Boat by Rhoba Phillips, special mention. 
Granny Martin's Secret by Edythe Hall, special mention. 

Poems — Twenty-one submitted. 
Hands by Dorothy Dieman, first place. 
Moon Sketches by Audrey King, second place. 
Luna Moths by Rhoba Phillips, first honorable mention. 
Greetings by Miss Fannie E. Wakeley,second honorable mention. 
A Primeval Meeting by Claude Craigmiles, special mention. 
Woodland Courtship by Frances Griswold, special mention. 

The winning poem Hands and those of the Moon Sketches 
that have not been printed before are in this number. The Fresh- 
men winners will appear in the April number which they are 
editing. 

The prize for first place in each contest is $5.00, for second 
place a free subscription to next year's Greetings. We con- 
gratulate those who placed, and all who entered, on an excellent 
contest. 133 



Xb\)t College <£reetlngs 



A NIGHT OF IT. 

Spencer strolled dreamily down the street. "Ah-h-h", he 
cooed tenderly to the church steeple, "Your eyes are like deep 
pools of cigarette smoke." 

He beamed radiantly down on the leafless lilac bush and 
was just ready to put out his hand to touch its silky fineness 
when he bumped square into some object. It seemed station- 
ary enough but rather out of place and while he was absently 
wondering what could be annoying him so a rather surprised 
voice pierced the stillness. 

"Why, its Spencer, good evening, my lad, "etc, etc. Spenc- 
er recognized his good friend the pastor on his way home from 
one of his many charitable errands. 

"To be sure," said Spencer, unaware of what the minister 
had asked him. 'Til be right over." 

So he left the poor man looking after him and suddenly 
shaking his head. 

From force of habit formed by three months turning in 
Spencer followed the walk up to the door of his boarding house. 
Indeed, hadn't Majorie's eyes opened sweetly when he told her 
that he was going to be a dentist? He'd work now harder than 
ever and begin plans right away for his office. He placed his 
forefinger firmly on the left lateral surface of the mandible of 
the keyhole and murmured professionally, "Open wide, please." 
But the keyhole didn't open wide, and neither did the door. 
And how could it? Fool! Of course he'd forgotten the key. It 
was up in his desk now. This was the first night he'd stayed 
out so late for a long time. Why couldn't a man keep his 
head even if he were at a dance with Marjorie. She probably 
wasn't even thinking of him, — but O boy, he wished he knew. 
She didn't look like the kind of a girl that'd forget a fellow the 
minute she lost sight of him, especially a dentist. "Of course," 
he sighed to the porch rail, "If I haven't a room or a bed, I've 
always got you." 

Why couldn't he get up stairs anyway? He wouldn't 
wake up the mater if he had to stay out there all night, for she 

134 



i 



<23l)e College Greetings 



frowned like a thunder cloud the last time and said he'd dis- 
turb all the boarders. Still he couldn't sit up all night and there 
wasn't even a door mat to lie on. If he tried to climb up the rose 
trellis he couldn't do any more than pull the whole business 
down on him, — and Marjorie would be so sorry when she came 
to see him in the hospital and perhaps she'd even — 

"Fool!" he commanded himself, "Shut up, can't you? 
Quit acting like a sentimental ninny and step to the bat like a 
man." Stepping to the bat in this case meant placing one foot 
on the trellis and beginning the upward accent. He saw just how 
he could do it; first, climb to the roof of the veranda, then walk 
slowly across the slippery shingles, span the chasm between the 
porch and the window ledge and swing himself in. 

With this line of progress in mind up he went. He did 
not stay long in one place for the trellis swung and swayed un- 
der his heavy weight. He was thankful when he got over the last 
board and on to the firm surface of the roof. The strain of the 
climb, the thrill of the conqueror and being so near the stars 
rather stirred his poetic nature, for even a future dentist can 
have one. "Just to be lifted," he composed, "As I have shif- 
ted, Toward the sky." What could have made his gaze shift 
too was strange, especially with such lofty thoughts. But it 
did, and down there on the star-lit grass was a great big black 
bulk with a small flash light. If the flash light had remained 
where it was everything would have been peaceful, but it didn't. 
It went playing around over the side of the house and finally 
rested on and almost blinded Spencer's eyes;not enough however 
so that he could not see the big revolver leveled at him, held in 
the big bulk's other hand. 

"Now," the star badged individual commanded in a gruff 
voice, "Right this way, my friend; we'll have no second story 
men around here." 

"You great big nut," glibly muttered Spencer as grasping the 
situation he waxed warmer and warmer. He turned himself 
around and came down four or five steps. The policeman, quite 
pleased, calmly pocketed his revolver and brought out his hand- 

135 



Td\)<l College (Breetings 



cuffs. But he was mistaken. Spencer turned square around with 
his back to the treliis. Still clinging with an overhand grasp to 
the top board, feet together, knees held high, he gathered him- 
self for a forward dismount. As he had intended it his feet 
came in contact with the person of the cop, but he did not un- 
derstand just how, for they both went over. The policeman was 
temporarily knocked off his feet but Spencer was quite still. 

"I didn't allow for the wind," he was muttering as the 
cop finally got him on his feet, "or the pressure of the night air." 
The kindly policeman allowed Spencer to wipe away the dirt 
from the side of his face before he put on the hand cuffs. Of 
course it did not take Spencer long after a good night's sleep 
in the police station to explain the situation to the group of 
good natured officers. He jammed his hat as far down over the 
right side of his face as he could get it and took the back way 
home. When he was about a block away he saw his landlady 
out sweeping off the front steps. He gave his hat another down- 
ward pull, straightened up as well as sore muscles would let him 
and walked briskly into the gate. 

"Why, good morning, mater," with a rather one sided 
smile, "there's nothing like a hike in the morning air, is there?" 

"That there hain't, Spencer, me laddie, and you're always 
the one that'll be knowin' how to keep your self bright and 
fine." 

Spencer opened the door and laboriously dragged himself 
up to his room. "O gosh," he groaned as he savagely stuffed 
a key in his pocket and held tenderly one side of his face, "O 
gosh, my tempo-mandibular articulation." 

— D. Dean. 

i )TTTTTT( > 

"You know that cat I was so familiar with." 
"Yes." 

"I am sorry to say that in Lab. the other day I was forced 
to cut him dead." 

—Ex. 

136 



obc <£olUge (Breetltt^s 



THE GORILLAS WIN 

Like a sky-rocket on a quiet night the basket-ball tourna- 
ment lighted up the last dull winter days. The first we heard of 
it was when Miss Boyd presented the teams to us in chapel. 
"Dinsmores Demons" — Dinsmore, Thompson, Hasenstab, 
Bradley, Steadry and Hall; "Gilpin's Gorillas" — Gilpin, Keyes, 
Meredith, Potter, Agger, Bly and Betcher; "McPherson's 
Fearsomes," — McPherson, Roark, Moore, Pfendler, McOmber 
and Dowd; "Murphy's Monkeys," — Murphy, McKinney, Le- 
sar, Vick, Munson and Rodgers. 

The first game on March 6, played by the Gorillas against 
the Demons was won by the Gorillas with a score of 32 to i 6. 
The Fearsomes won from the Monkeys 15 to 11. 

The next night the "Faculty Fumblers" defeated the "Fac- 
ulty Flappers" in a most unusual game. The line-up was, 
"Fumblers," — Hamilton, Davis, Tickle, Graybeal and Thomp- 
son. "Flappers," — Swanson, Jewell, Morgan, Kirby and 
Anderson. Score 17 to 13. The Monkeys beat the Demons 
14 to 9. 

An excited crowd was present on the last night to see the 
championship game between the Gorillas and the Fearsomes. 
There have been other see-saw games, but none in which there 
was such rythmical regularity, or such an accompaniment of 
shrieks. The Gorilla end of the see-saw was in the air at the 
end with 31 to 26 in their favor. As a fitting reward, the vic- 
tors were given a ten-cent purchase at the Phi Nu grocery. 

I >"""< > 

Room — "Set the alarm for two, will you?" 

Mate — "You, and who else?" — Exchange. 

Miss Austin — "The Student Volunteer Band will meet 
at one o'clock in the social room." 

A Freshman of one week — "Oh, I'm so glad we have a 
band here. I can keep time beautifully." 

137 



r?be College (Greetings 



A WORD TO WOULD-BE WRITERS 

Pasadena, Cal. 
To You of the Greetings :- 

One bade me write, and since The Greetings is a common 
bond between would-be writers I shall think of it now as a 
clearing house for personal experiences. 

I wrote my first book when I was a child. It was a weighty 
book written with much mental agitation. It was not written 
at one sitting — rather at varying intervals, but always at white 
heat. A chapter was added whenever I judged that I had been 
abused or misunderstood by my family. The purpose of the 
book was that it might serve to guide me when I should be 
grown and have a little daughter. It was to enable me to get 
the child's viewpoint at all times, a thing I was very sure my 
own parents did not get. The book was destroyed by its auth- 
or during a period of teen-consciousness, but you can readily 
see that it is a loss to all students of child psychology as well as 
to literature. Had it been preserved I might rank with delic- 
ious Daisy Ashford or the questionable Opal. 

Later I fared forth in the Greetings and I still feel a loving 
tenderness for those fragmentary sketches. Nor do I blush to 
say so, for as I reread them I find that they savor far more of 
Miss Stevenson, Miss Neville and Miss Tanner than they do 
of me. Be that as it may, they served to show me that Litera- 
ture was my chosen field. 

Added to these early promises was the compelling face that 
looked at me from every magazine I opened assuring me that 
others had made hundreds of dollars while taking a few cor- 
respondence lessons in magazine writing and that this opportu- 
nity awaited me. Did I dare bang such a door shut? After for- 
ty lessons were completed I was rewarded by being told that I 
showed promise — unusual promise — in fact the very type that 
needed an advanced course to fully develop it. Much did I 
learn. I know the proper form to present a scenario, how to 
seek interviews with famous people, how to approach an Edi- 
tor either by letter or by person. I know the psychology of 

138 



J 



T5t)<t <£olltgt (Brcctlngs 



having a stamped envelope ready and waiting, addressed to a 
"second choice" so that a returned manuscript can be sent out 
again before the depression of its return takes hold upon one. 
I know the value of getting into a magazine through the by- 
ways of a household discovery, a recipe, a feature article though 
one wishes to be known as a writer of essays. Armed with such 
knowledge I decide to succumb to potboilers, yet something dis- 
turbs my decision. There comes to me the message of an old 
Chapel Talk, a cry of accomplished purpose — a setting out for 
the Land of Canaan and a coming into that land. There comes, 
too, another call and I can see the glowing face of John Bur- 
roughs and hear his calm voice admonish, "Be honest with self. 
Write what is from life and your own heart." Is it not after all 
but another case of "to thine own self be true"? 

You thought that I was a writer? I am not, I am merely 
a cook and a housekeeper. If I depended upon my literary ef- 
forts, I fear me the ravens would have to feed and clothe me, 
too. Instead I draw a monthly check for services rendered. 
Fannie Farmer is my favorite author and my daily goal three 
meals a day. 

To you of today, heed my warning, follow my childish 
instinct. Commence now to write a book on the feelings of col- 
lege girls so that in the future when you are asked to write 
Greetings' letters you will have the very viewpoint of a college 
girl — and don't destroy the book. 

Sincerely, 

Atlerte Hammell, ex '15. 

I >TTTTTT < ) 

Miss Wakely — "Have any of you been to Alaska?" 
(Class is wreathed in smiles) . 

Miss W. — "Well, that is not impossible, I hope to go be- 
fore I die — but I'll have to hurry — ! 

Mary Lib looks up from her physiology text. "Kentucky, 
am I a vertebrate or an invertebrate." 

"I always thought you had plenty of back-bone, Mary 
Lib." 139 



T5\)Z College (Brettlngs 



THE MASCULINE ELEMENT AT I. W. C 

My Sis wouldn't look at a man when she was in high 
school, so when she went off to college, she just naturally went 
to a Woman's College, the one at Jacksonville. I bet she knew 
there was another college there that wasn't just for girls. 

Anyway, as soon as she got there she started writing home 
about the men she was meeting. Al Blodget was on the train, 
and he promised Sis he'd help her get acquainted around Jack- 
sonville. Billy Betcher and Joe Rink met her at the station, 
and she was awful keen about 'em both. When mom read this, 
she said that Sis had better be careful how and where she met 
her friends. 

The next day Sis said she met a couple of freshmen, Clyde 
Connell and Claude Craigmiles. I suppose they were from the 
other college. She went down town with them and to Ehnie's 
for something to eat. Sis, who couldn't have one man at 
home, walking off with two! 

Sis just mentioned these five for a while, — they lived near 
the Woman's College, I guess. But pretty soon she began 
raving about another fellow. It was Vic this and Vic that until 
you 'most thought Vic ran that Woman's College. He made 
speeches at chapel, he auctioned things for endowment, he even 
went to a dance with Sis at the college gymnasium. When mom 
read the letter to the minister when he called she didn't read 
about the dance/cause he said once that one thing he approved 
about the Woman's College was that they didn't let the girls 
dance with men. I guess times have changed since he heard last. 

Next Sis fell for a guy named Tommy Dieman. She didn't 
say so much about what he was like, so I guess she didn't see 
much of him; but he must have written her a lot of letters. She 
was always tellling how wonderful he could write. He even 
wrote her poetry! Sis said he and his roommate could write 
about the best poetry in school. I wonder if all the fellows sent 
poetry to their girls. They must be far gone when they do 
that. I know I'm never going to write poetry for any girl! 

140 



T5l)e College (Breetings 



There were some more Billy's Sis raved about, — Billy Hall 
and Billy Wagner. And once a Bill Bain came to a party, and 
Sis thought he was grand. He graduated the year before, Sis 
said. I guess he was from the other college, too. 

What I don't see is how those people that run that college 
expect the girls to get anything done, when they let the fellows 
hang around the way they do. I'm anxious for Sis to come 
home and bring pictures of some of those men so I can see what 
they're like. I'll bet those who write poetry are sissy looking 

l 1TTTTTTI > 

OBSERVATIONS OF OSCAR. 

(Shh! This is just Ophelia under a new name so she can 
slip into the Masculine Number. ) 

I was pawing around in the old bound volumes of the 
Greetings, and was delighted to find that 20 years ago, in March 
1903, the basketball teams of I. W. C. were named "Harvard, 
Yale, Princeton," etc. And in 1923, the Fearsomes are pulling 
the Monkeys' tails while the brute strength of the Gorilla is pit- 
ted against Demoniacal cleverness, interspersed with faculty 
Flapping and Fumbling. 

In this same number, 20 years old, was an article titled "A 
Girl's Finances." "Do you think," it inquires, "that $600 will 
overestimate the actual expenses of the college girl for one year? 
This seems a great deal but with this (in addition to regular col- 
lege charges) I have allowed her society, athletic dues, church 
collection and class fees." Which reminds me that movies 
twenty years ago were called "nickel shows". And she probably 
always had her reserve book down on time. 

Thinking in terms of expenses, didn't they look stylish and 
prosperous, — the old girls who came back for the banquets? 
One did not feel like exclaiming, "Lo the poor school-teacher," 
but rather, "there's a good time coming"! Then I thought of 
my present wardrobe, — and of Spring coming with a vengeance. 
Perhaps, however, last year's hat isn't entirely incorrigible. 

141 



CAFE CONFECTIONERY 

^Peacock 3nn 



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CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
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FARRELL STATE BANK 

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Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
T. A. Chapin, Vice-President £ ^ parTeU 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j' gj Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

GILBERTS DRUGSTORE 

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REXALL REMEDIES 



THE 
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ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
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ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-Presi dent H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

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Widmayer's High Grade Meals, Etc. 

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Cask Market 

CHOICE MEATS 

OF ALL KINDS 

Both Phones 196 

No. 230 WEST STATE STREET 




Music Hall 

Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 

Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



JLLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle 
West, in a beautiful, dignified, old college town, noted 
for its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are looking 
for a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORE 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 

74 E. SIDE SQUARE 

Buckthorpe Brothers 

Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 



Schram & Buhrman j 
Jewelers 

BOTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



Wiegand Market 

2.2,4 E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 

Quality and Service our Motto 



CAFE CONFECTIONERY 

peacock Inn 



For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Our Fountain 

CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELER'S FANS 

JACKSONVILLE Ry. & LIGHT CO. 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
T. A. Chapin, Vice-President £• A. Chapm 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j." g.' Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

GILBERTS DRUG STORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 



Box of Fine Stationery 

Hammermill Bond 

250 Sheets of Paper and 250 Envelopes $2.25 

Roach Printing Office 

Opposite Post Office 



He — I jumped out of a four story building once. 

She — Oh, Jack, were you badly hurt? 

He — Naw, you see I was on the first floor when I jumped. 

Are cantelopes people who are too young to get married? 



BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN 


Mbr^SI§ 


Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 


Exclusive Agents 

Hartman ^Vardrobe Trunks 

Complete Line Hand Baggage 

Mannish 


45-47 South Side Square 


Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ezard 

Tlie Book and Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETINGS 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILLE 

Istill believe in and sell "QUALITY" foot- 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 



Spietl) Studio 

Photography In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 

Portraiture 

S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

"Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 North Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready-to-Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



The 

Artcraft Printing 
Office 



213 WEST MORGAN ST. 

Telephone 400 

EMIL HARWEY 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORKS 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388— Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 

Everything Musical 



49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


J. H. ZELL 


AT YOUR SERVICE 

FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 




YOUR FILMS TO US 


GROCERY 


jJie Armstrong 


A good place to get good things 
to eat at a reasonable 


Drug Stores 


price 


QUALITY STORES 




S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State St 


EAST STATE STREET 


Jacksonville, 111. 



Shank ens 

Woman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
store will give you a better 
idea as to what is new. 


W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 

322-324 East State Street 


SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


J. P. BROWN 
Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 


^ine Stationery 
ano 

Gift St)op Novelties 


TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 


19 South Side Square 

Jacksonville 


HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 


H. J. SMITH 

MILLINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 

LADIES' HOSIERY 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 


CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



WT^m 4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

W cUlL TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 

FLOWER FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IN 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

TelepLone 59 229 E. State St. 




%) Always — 



i FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

SSiiXTX &dV FOR BRUSHES AND 

UKU13 **W. FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT— 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 

OF FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

We Repair xj >—v tt~> T> Tj^ X~> 4^-J We shine 
Shoes XX \J JT MT Mli XC W Shoes 

On the Cornet 

For Those Who Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN TV. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies* Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFIVER 

// it's New— We Have It 10 WEST SIDE SQ. 

EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 



Woman's College girls can always findacomptele 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Tomlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 



C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

EVERYTHING IN 

DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

NORTH MAIN STREET 



Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 

Office and Residence 

. . 120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH] 

Made Clean Sola Clean 

EAT 

MORE 

BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCBLLOSl 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us supply the eats for your next feed 



Xb I) e College <B r e e t i n 9 5 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

Father Prescribes 142 

Luna Moths 148 

The Primeval Meeting 148 

Woodland Courtshp 149 

Advice to the Needy 150 

Observations of Ophelia 1 5 1 

Bobbed Hair 153 

Basket Ball 153 

Attention ! Class of ' 2 6 ! 155 

A Junior's Idea of a Freshman 155 

Freshmen Recognition 156 

Freshmen — As We See Them 157 

An Interrupted Deal 158 

Our Class Song 164 



Obc College Greetings 



FATHER PRESCRIBES 
By Mary McMillan — First Place in the Short Stoty Contest. 

It was a rather chilly spring evening. Mr. and Mrs. Van- 
deveer were seated in front of a big open fire in the lovely living 
room of their town house. Mr. Vandeveer, a short, heavy-set 
man of about fifty, was reading the evening paper and smoking, 
and his wife was fussily arranging the books on the table. Sud- 
denly, she sat down and began some needle-work, but she soon 
put this aside, saying, "William, I guess I might as well confess 
it. I simply don't know how to deal with Marjorie." 

Mr. Vandeveer looked over the top of his newspaper at his 
wife and then carefully knocked the ashes from his cigar, "Well, 
what has she done now? Eloped?" 

"Oh, William, you never do take her seriously. If you 
only — but, William, look, you have dropped some of those ash- 
es on the rug. My dear, I do wish you would be more careful. 
But, as I was saying about Marjorie, she is getting more unman- 
ageable every day. What do you think she has done now?" 

"Well, what?" 

"She went down to the hairdresser's this morning to have 
her hair marcelled, and when she came back — " here words failed 
her. 

"She hadn't had her head shaved or anything like that, had 
she?" 

"No, but, William, she had taken a henna bath, and I wish 
you could see her! You know she had such a fair complexion, 
but now she looks as if she had been in Africa for the winter 
and there got covered with just layers of tan. I really doubt if 
you'll know her." 

"Well, that's not so bad. I wouldn't worry over a little 
thing like that. I suppose the stuff wears off?" 

"Yes, but William," she was almost tearful, "suppose it 
wears off in streaks?" 

Mr. Vandeveer chuckled. "That would be a good joke 

142 



Orje College (Breedings 



on Marjorie. But is that all the little rascal has done?" 

"No, it wouldn't be so bad if that was all, but it's not. It 
is their society — but here she comes." 

A gay little laugh was heard in the hall. The door opened, 
and Marjorie entered the living room, followed by a good-look- 
ing youth of about twenty. Mr. Vandeveer looked at his 
daughter, this new complexioned daughter, and smiled. 

"Come on in, Speedy. You are acquainted with Mother 
and Dad, aren't you?" She turned to her parents, "Please keep 
Speedy from getting into mischief until I get back. I'm going 
to change my dress, and then we are going over to Harriet's and 
from there to a dance at the Club. We had a most wonderful 
time this afternoon, didn't we?" She laughed and vanished from 
the room. 

"So you young folks are on another tear, tonight, are you, 
Richard? Did Marjorie say it was at the Club?" asked Mr. 
Vandeveer. 

"Yes, sir," Richard Stevens answered. "Harriet McAndrews 
is giving a dance to initiate their new society." 

"Their new society?" 

"Hasn't Marjorie told you about it? Their crowd has 
organized a society — just girls — which they call "The Nut- 
Brown Maidens", and their purpose is single — to see who can 
originate the most startling and amusing fad in order to make 
things 'peppy'. They began by being 'henna-ed'. You know we 
do get tired of just going from dance to dance all of the time." 

Mrs. Vandeveer smiled faintly, "Oh you young people, 
what will you think of next?" 

At that moment, Marjorie entered the room again. "Ready, 
Speedy? How do you like my new healthy color, Dad? It's 
quite the snake's shimmies, I think. Bye-bye, Mother. I'll be in 
early this evening, maybe. C'mon, old top." 

Laughing and talking, the two young people hurried out. 

"Now, what do you think of that?" asked Mrs. Vandeveer. 

143 



^5l?e College Greetings 



"I think Marjorie needs to visit Susan and Elizabeth for 
three or four weeks. I'm sure she would find them quite the 
snake's shimmies." He laughed softly to himself. "I'm sure 
Marjorie would enjoy going to bed at ten o'clock every night, 
getting up at six in the morning, helping get breakfast, washing 
dishes, making her own bed, and especially, going to all the fun- 
ny little 'sociables' they have in that odd little old-fashioned 
town." 

Mrs. Vandeveer looked astonished. "Why, William, she 
wouldn't stay. And imagine, no young people, no dances — " 
she was too surprised to say anything more. 

Her husband laughed, "Oh, yes, I think she would stay 
And think of the good it would do her." He had a mental pict- 
ure of his two prim spinster sisters. They were not old, Eliza- 
beth was thirty-six and Susan thirty-eight. Their brother could 
never understand why they insisted on being so old-fashioned 
and peculiar. 

"We'll consider it settled then," he announced finally. "Mar- 
jorie leaves day after tomorrow for a prolonged visit with her 
aunts in New Bedford. We'll just send them a telegram to let 
them know she is coming, but they do not need to take the 
trouble to meet her." 

Mrs. Vandeveer nodded her head in agreement. 

Friday morning found Marjorie on the train which was 
hurrying her away from all her friends, their dances, and their 
house-parties to three weeks of imprisonment. 

"Why did I tell Dad I would go?" she asked herself. "But 
he always has been able to get promises from me. I'm going to 
stick it out. I expect to get a lot of kick out of this small-town 
life. Aunt Susan and Aunt Bess will be such 'pals' with me 
too," she added, sarcastically. "But what if I can have a good 
time? I will, I will," she said with vengeance. "Imagine me 
washing dishes and going to bed at eight o'clock." The idea was 
too amusing. She giggled and immediately felt better. 

144 



Olje ColUge (Breetings 



She looked about her at the other passengers. There was 
no one who interested her. She opened a magazine and began, 
to read. She became so absorbed in the story that she didn't 
notice how fast the time was flying. Suddenly, in the midst of 
a thrilling account of the meeting of two lovers after they had 
been separated two months, she heard the conductor call, "New 
Bedford. New Bedford." 

On alighting from the train, she looked about her for some- 
one she knew. No one was there, so relying upon her memory 
of the last visit to her aunts six years ago, she set out to find their 
house. It was not far to the old-fashioned red-brick house in 
which the two spinsters lived. She walked up the clean brick 
walk, up on the porch, and pulled the old-fashioned knocker. 
Almost immediately the door opened, and Marjorie found her- 
self face to face with Aunt Bess. 

"Hullo, Auntie, how is every little thing?" 

"Why, Marjorie, I'm so glad to see you. Come in, child." 
She gave her niece a little peck on the cheek. 

"I'm rather dirty, of course, after riding on that old train 
for so long, but, otherwise I'm all right. Where's Aunt Sue? 
Let's find her and go up stairs and clean up." 

As they started to Marjorie's room, Susan appeared at the 
head of the stairs. "Oh, hello, you old dear," cried Marjorie, 
dropping her suitcase, and bounding up the stairs to kiss her 
aunt. 

Elizabeth, with surprise, picked up the suitcase which her 
niece had dropped and carried it up the stairs. When she came 
to the door of the room, she found her sister running the water 
for Marjorie's bath, while the girl was telling of her journey. 
When Marjorie saw her aunt with the suitcase, she stopped her 
narrative long enough to say, "Oh, here you are. Just set them 
down, you dear thing. I suppose they have to be unpacked. 
Auntie won't you please take out a few things for me right now, 
and I'll do the rest later? Just hang up the dresses, and put the 

145 



"&\)<i College (Greetings 



rest of the things in the bureau drawer. You are such a sweet 
thing to help me so." 

Rather dazedly, Aunt Bess did as she was told, while Mar- 
jorie disrobed and went into the bathroom, talking all the while. 
"Oh, Aunt Sue, it's just great of you to get everything ready for 
my bath, and, Auntie, would you mind making me a little hot 
chocolate and cake? I'm just starved. You can make the best 
chocolate, and your cakes are delicious." 

By the time Elizabeth had completely unpacked the suit- 
cases, Marjorie was ready to have her bobbed hair curled. "Auntie 
do you suppose you could curl my hair? It's really lots of fun 
to do it, but I'm so dead-tired." 

Elizabeth was just going to suggest that she had unpacked 
the suitcases, and it might be well for Marjorie to try doing 
something for herself. She looked at the curling iron and at 
Marjorie's lovely hair and decided she would like to curl and 
comb that beautiful fluffy mass. Marjorie showed her how it 
was done and then began telling about the wonderful times she 
had been having. 

"Auntie, you haven't told me how you like my new com- 
plexion. I had a henna bath, and see what a healthy color I 
have now." 

Elizabeth looked shocked. "A henna bath? Why did you 
do that?" 

"Now, Aunt Bess, you know I look lots better, don't I?" 
She shook her finger at her aunt's reflection in the mirror. "Oh, 
I wanted to ask you, are there any young people around here?" 

"No, there isn't a decent young person in this town. As 
soon as they are old enough, they always go away to school and 
never come back here to live." 

Marjorie looked disappointed for a moment. Then she 
brightened. "Oh, Auntie, I have the most wonderful plan. Lend 
me your ear just a minute." She pulled Elizabeth's head down 
and began whispering in her ear. 

146 



ohe College (Greetings 



The aunt shook her head vigorously. "No, we can't do 
that. We haven't done anything like that since — well, for a- 
long time." 

"Now, Auntie," Marjorie said coaxingly, "do it just to 
please a bad little girl that likes you awful much. Won't you 
please?" 

Elizabeth hesitated. Should she? She began to get excited 
over the idea, although she was mentally calling herself a silly 
old woman. "Well, we'll see Susan about it. Here she comes 
now with your chocolate." 

While Marjorie sipped the hot chocolate and ate a large 
piece of delicious caramel cake, Elizabeth, with the aid of her 
niece, told Susan about the plan. She was rather apologetic 
about it, as though she knew it was an unusual thing for them 
to do. Much to her surprise, however, Susan was very enthusi- 
astic. 

"Why, yes, I think it will be fun. I really believe we'll 
enjoy it, Bess." 

Marjorie carefully set her tray on the table, and jumped to 
her feet, throwing her arms around both of her aunts, kissing 
first one, and then the other of them. 

"Oh, you darlings," she cried, "let's go get ready." 

Mr. and Mrs. Vandeveer found the old house very lone- 
some with Marjorie away, and the two days that she had been 
gone seemed like months to them. Sunday morning the lonely 
old couple were eating breakfast when a messenger boy arrived 
with a telegram. It was a night letter written by Marjorie the 
evening before. Hurriedly Mr. Vandeveer read: 

Dearest Parents: 

Am having a perfectly gorgeous time. Eight of the crowd 
are here. My aunties consented to being chaperones for a week- 
long house-party. They are enjoying themselves as much as 
we are at the dances, taffy-pulls, etc. You would never know 
them. 

Much love, 
147 Marjorie." 



T5\)t College Greetings 



Mrs. Vandeveer looked at her husband in dismay. "Oh, 
Father, as a person for meting out punishment, you are simply 
unequaled." 

Her husband laughed sheepishly. "Well, maybe I didn't 
succeed in doing much for Marjorie, but think of what she has 
done to Elizabeth and Sue!" 

« >TTTTTT« > 

LUNA MOTHS 
By Rhoba Philips — First Honorable Mention. 
The moths that fly above the moonlit stream, 
On graceful wings of palest, softest green, 
See not the moon that shines above so fair, 
But come to seek the light reflected there 
In water clear. Not moths but fairies they. 
Hear their low song as in the light they play. 

"'Twas long ago 

That this pure light 

That shines below 

So clear and white 

Came from the night 

With us to dwell. 

Goddess of white! 

Our love for you 

We cannot tell, 

We only view 

And wish you well." 
Like us, these foolish fairies of the wood 
Are always blinded to the source of good. 

< nmm > 

THE PRIMEVAL MEETING 
By Claude Craigmiles — Special Mention. 
The wind blew, and the clouds 
Tossed through the murky heavens, 
As huge monsters chained — 

148 



Obe College (Brae tings 



But not subdued. 

The gloom and blackness 

Split asunder 

As lightning flashed 

Like signals from a diety 

To his followers. 

Deafening peals of thunder 

Rolled through the mountains 

Of clouds, and reechoed 

On the planet called Earth. 

Men, the inhabitants of this sphere, 

Were stricken with terror, 

And groped with fear in the darkness. 

Wild shrieks pierced the ether, 

But penetrated not to the clouds. 

Agony and terror engulfed the Earth, 

When in the tumult of the clouds 

Two souls met. 

'Twas but a thought — but from the vastness 

Of the universe 

Stole peace, and joy, and calm. 



Dinmc 



WOODLAND COURTSHIP 

By Frances Griswold — Special Mention. 
He sought her in the wood, 
Ah! there he spied her 
Resting on a mossy bank 
Alluring, fair, and charming. 
Enchanted sat he down beside her, 
Whispering gentle words of love 
Until submissive to his charms 
She was his own, — 
She, — a modest tender violet 
And he, the passing wind. 
149 



Ol)<£ College (Brtttlttgs 



ADVICE TO THE NEEDY 

I have given this page over to I. W. C. girls because I have 
so many letters from them that I am not able to write each one 
individually. 

Mdme. I. M. DeVorced. 
Dear Mdme.: 

I need your wise advice very much for there is a matter 
which, being only a Sophomore in I. W. C, I do not feel cap- 
able of dealing with. 

A young gentlemen who is attending I. C. has been paying 
me considerable attention and says he cares for me a great deal. 
He is my ideal of a man — handsome, with truthful black eyes 
and a convincing manner. I feel guilty when I doubt him, but 
I overheard a Freshman say that he was feeding me a line. I'm 
not sure just what she meant but think she must have been mak- 
ing insinuations against the veracity of his statements. 

I hope you can council me in this matter. 

Worldly Unwise. 
Worldly Unwise: 

Yes, you need advice as I can plainly see. In the first place, 
never believe what a man, much less an I. C. man, tells you. You 
know that being in a town where there are so many girls will 
eventually make an efficient prevaricator out of the best of men. 

Perhaps the Freshman was casting some slight reflections, 
but I am sure that she did not intend for you to hear them. Dear 
little girl, if you could only realize that what this young man 
tells you now he probably has told other girls times unnumber- 
ed! Don't let that disturb you, however, and if you can be- 
lieve him I am sure you will be much happier. So just close your 
eyes, and your ears, and go your way. 

Dear Mdme.: 

I have been interested in the advice which you have given 
others and wonder if you cannot help me also. 

150 



Orje College <&r*eUngs 






I am a Freshman in I. W. C, as good looking as the aver- 
age — maybe even better looking. I am engaged to a man back 
home, and we will probably be married a year from this June. 
He gave me a wonderful diamond Xmas, and I have his frat pin. 
He is far away, and I am lonesome. Do you see anything wrong 
in my having dates with a clever young man here? I've had a 
few dates with him, and I see him at Ehnie's frequently. It 
isn't necessary to tell him I'm engaged is it? I don't think it 
would be kind to tell my fiance that I am having dates here be- 
cause he might worry or think it would be all right for him to 
do the same, don't you think so? 

Hortense 

P. S. Should I accept the frat pin of the friend in town — 
until June? 
Hortense: 

Now, my dear,do you think you are quite fair to the young 
men? You I. W. C. girls go by the policy of "what he doesn't 
know won't hurt him", but this is not the attitude you should 
take. Of course you are lonesome, and think it very nice for 
the young man to entertain you. If you accept his frat pin 
don't wear them at the same time, as that would be a slight 
breach of etiquette. Also it would be better to wear your 
diamond on your right hand, when out with him, and tell him 
you received it for graduation. 

Be true to your fiance and above all things don't forget to 
tell him in the Sunday night letter, which you write just before 
the friend arrives, how much you wish he could be with you. 

( muni > 
OBSERVATIONS OF OPHELIA 

Big Sister can't come down and talk to you today, so she 
told me — her little sis, to entertain you. I hope I won't tell any 
family secrets, as they say little sisters always do, but if I make 
any mistakes or break any rules of etiquette you'll excuse me, 
won't you? 

151 



Ol)£ College (Greetings 



I suppose you've heard about Ophelia's hair? Do you re- 
member when she said something about "staid and sober souls 
— falling from grace"? And there is Ruth Bradley, too. It seems 
that no one from Seniors to Freshmen are immune. It only re- 
mains for the faculty to commit themselves. 

And Ruby really did come back. You know Miss Austin 
was so worried. Wouldn't it have been exciting if it had been 
her honeymoon? 

Yes, the weather is awful, There is just one consolation. I 
guess if it rains a lot we won't have to drink lemonade instead 
of water any more. 

'Twas rather unfortunate for Miss Hay, though. Yes, you 
know the wind turned one umbrella inside out for her, and she 
bought another one. She had just started out with it when the 
top of that one flew off too. 

No, we haven't had a fire drill lately. Seems queer, but I 
suppose they think that we are all taking the precautions they 
demonstrated some time ago. But there's just one thing I'd like 
to know. If I discovered a fire, where would I go to turn in 
the alarm? You don't know? Well, I've found a great many 
people who don't know, either, and I just wondered. 

This is just a hint to the house-keepers to be. A little 
water color deftly applied will remove (or at least cover up) 
acid spots. Ask Sarita for particulars. 

We've been having very pleasant rumors issuing from the 
chapel and know that the Glee Club concert will be just wonder- 
ful, and of course we'll all go. I suppose Ophelia herself will 
tell you all about it next month. 

I hope you notice I haven't said a thing about Endowment! 
"Actions speak louder than words" and we are all doing, not 
talking just now. 

— Ophelia's Little Sister. 
i nmm > 

One swallow doesn't make a summer, but one frog can 
make a spring. — Ex. 

152 



T5\)t College (Breedings 



BOBBED HAIR 
(Tune of "Yon Yonson") 
Dedicated to A Senior. 
I'm an I. W. C. Freshman 
And there is one question 
That I meet with everywhere. 
When I go down to the hall 
My friends, one and all, 
Say, "Why don't you cut off your hair?" 

Then I tell them: 
"'Tho 'twould save time and patience 
And would doubtless look better 
And Mother says she doesn't care, 
I wanta make a sensation 
When I am a Senior 
By bobbing my beautiful hair." 

— R. P. 

BASKET-BALL 

Friday afternoon at 4:15, the Freshmen and Sophomores 
played the first game of the inter-class basketball tournament. 
The score was 33 to 16 in favor of the Sophomores. The lineup 
was: 

Sophomores Freshmen 

Maurine Gilpin, Captain Lola Lesar, Captain 

Center, Gilpin Center Bradley 

Running C, Keys Running C, Steadry 

Forwards, Moore, Hasenstab Forwards, Lesar, Hall 

Guards, Dowd, Potter.Rodgers Guards,Agger,McPherson 



Dnnnc 



We wondered why someone said "Bare! Woof, woof!" 
every time Lucille Vick made a basket. Now we hear that it 
was really a (Teddy) bear! 



153 



~5\)<i College ©reelings 



Vol. XXVI. L Jacksonville, III., Matek, 1 923 L No. 6 

STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 
Associate Editor 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 



FRESHMAN STAFF 

Birdie Arbuthnot, Editor 

Lola Lesar, Helen McPherson, Esther Mittendorf. 

We, the Freshman Class, herewith present to you our first 
efforts in editing a college paper. Into its making we have put 
our best efforts, for we accepted the staff's invitation with a deep 
sense of the responsibility offered us. It has been our desire and 
intention to maintain the usual high standard of the publica- 
tion and we offer you this, the Freshman Number, with a sense 
of its short-comings. May we ask you to be as kindly towards 
its failings as you will be generous to virtues. 

< >"nii< > 

Overheard at the table: 

"I heard that Miss Johnston's father wrote the Roman 
Life books. What was his first name?" 

"Samuel, I think," responded a bright freshman. 

t 1TTTTTH > 

Two little worms were digging away iti dead earnest. 
Poor Earnest! — Ex. 

154 



obe (TolUge (Breetings 



ATTENTION! CLASS '26! 

The February Greetings stated that societies had become 
almost useless institutions. Can the members of our Freshman 
society stand calmly by and let such a statement pass unrefuted? 
Can you believe that this is true of Alpha Pi Delta? Why can't 
Alpha Pi Delta accept such a challenge and prove that the above 
statement does not apply to it? 

The Greetings also stated that "a solution might be found 
in instilling strong purposes once more in the societies." Alpha 
Pi Delta has an ideal purpose: " to aid its members in acquiring 
a more general knowledge of literature, music and art; to train 
them in parliamentary usage; to offer opportunity for practice 
in public speaking and debate; to promote social intercourse in 
the freshman class; and to further the growth of a true college 
spirit." Surely with such a purpose fully carried out Alpha Pi 
Delta's problem should be solved. If every member made this 
high ideal all her own, Alpha Pi Delta would become an in- 
stitution which would be able to fulfill the highest ambitions of 
its charter members. 

Wake up, class of '26. Make your Alpha Pi Delta surpass 
that of the class of twenty-five. 

—'26 

l >TTTTTT< > 

A JUNIORS IDEA OF THE FRESHMEN 

You are our sister class, Freshmen, perhaps I might call 
you our "little sisters". Do you remember the tone in which 
you used to say, "Oh, are you a Junior?" It was quite flattering 
to us, and I think you realize that we like you. Have you 
noticed that a Junior will say, "Oh, go on," and give you a 
friendly shove into the elevator ahead of her? You see we re- 
member our Freshmen days, sympathize, and because we are up- 
perclassmen, Juniors, we know that it is not necessary for us to 
assert our position continually. Perhaps the Seniors would call 

155 



Ol)C College (Breettngs 



you flighty, the Sophomores may call you greenies, but we 
Juniors have decided that you have pep. We say, "Gee, the 
Freshman class is peppy this year." We're proud of you, Fresh- 
men. 

i >TTTTTT< > 

FRESHMEN RECOGNITION 

The Freshmen Recognition, which took place on March 1 7, 
was, for us, one of the great events of the year. One hundred 
and four eager Freshmen became full fledged students of I. W. C. 

The class colors of green and white were very much in edi- 
dence, both in decoration and dress. 

The service was very impressive and beautiful. The class 
song, composed by one of our members, opened services held in 
chapel. Hildreth Ashwood, representing the class of '22, then 
presented the banner to the class of '26. 

Rev. Pontius, pastor of the Christian Church, gave a brief 
but interesting talk on the "Evolution of the Human Race." 

The services closed by singing the College song. 

At dinner the Freshmen enjoyed table parties, and again 
the class colors were in evidence. The meal was enlivened by 
some very peppy songs. 

— E. M. 

I ITTTTTn 1 

FRESHMEN-JUNIOR PARTY 

The evening of St. Patrick's day was celebrated by the 
Freshmen giving a party for the juniors. The "Clowns" fur- 
nished entertainment for the evening. The couples glided grace- 
fully to the "Aristocratic Jazz" until 9 o'clock. Miss Powell 
then gave a selection from "Peg O' My Heart", a stunt "The 
Evolution of a Junior" (originated by Edythe Hall) was pan- 
tomined by the Freshmen, and Hazel Iungerich gave a very 
charming feature dance. The dancing then continued. Green and 
white featured the color scheme, even to the dainty refreshments. 
The strains of "Home Sweet Home" were regretfully greeted by 
guests and hostesses alike. — L. J. L. 

156 



Ol>e College (Greetings 



Freshman (after Pat's announcement in chapel) — That's 
funny! I never heard of a Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union giving a dance before! 



Dnnnc 



FRESHMEN— AS WE SEE THEM 

In trying to formulate the Senior's idea of the Freshman of 
our College, insistently the refrain. "How times have changed" 
rings in my ears. Yes, we were Freshmen once, but is it four 
years since that time? Was it four years ago that we thought 
we'd never live long enough, nor learn enough to be a Senior? 
Perhaps it was!then, see "how times have changed!" 

Well do I remember my first days at College. Days, when 
I was overcome by my own insignificance and awed by the aug- 
ust presence of the Upper classmen. We Freshmen gasped at 
what we must pass through before we would be deemed worthy 
of the respect which they held. "Would it be possible for us to 
obtain as much knowledge and dignity as those other girls had?" 
"Surely," we thought, "it's a big jump from a respected High 
School Senior to — well the word "Freshman" explained it all. 

I've heard some say that in that respect, too, "Times have 
changed." Perhaps it is due to our change in attitude — for not 
one of the present Upper Classmen looks upon the Freshmen 
as we once imagined Upper Classmen did. Perhaps, the Fresh- 
men themselves have altered things by their actions and ideas of 
their own value. It is said that a Faculty Member asked a 
Freshmen why College was such a learned place. The Fresh- 
men replied, "Well, when we come we bring some learning from 
our High Schools, and the Upper Classmen never take anything 
away." 

We agree — you Freshmen do bring things with you — 
things of which no one would deprive you. Your "pep" and 
enthusiasm are the wonder and admiration of all of us and we 
like to see you express them. More important, however, than 
your spirit, knowledge, or loyalty, are your personalities. We 

157 



Ob<* CotUge (Brecttngs 



/*&e t/ou, Freshmen. We appreciate the little courtesies you 
show to us. We delight in your love for the College; and we 
are counting on you to uphold loyally the standards of our dear 
Alma Mater. — '23 

AN INTERRUPTED DEAL. 
By Birdie Arbuthnot — Second Place in the Contest. 

George Bailey was discouraged. The long draught had 
dried up his promising field of corn. The pastures, too, were 
dried and parched and there was nothing to fed his hungry herd 
of cows, but the hay that should be kept until winter. The 
hot dry weather had its effect on the milk supply, and the milk 
check had been inadequate indeed. It was all the more so be- 
cause of the stand the milk-distributing companies had taken. 
Making a plea of lowering the price of milk to the poor city 
children, they had paid the farmers fifteen cents a gallon less. 
Even then the price to the consumer had only dropped one cent, 
and it made George's blood boil to think that he was not in a 
position to demand just dealing with himself or anyone else. 
An overwhelming sense of his own uselessness came upon him 
as he thought the matter over. Here he was thirty-five years old, 
unable to make his own living. He winced as he thought of 
the long hard hours dear, loyal Martha put in. Her hands were 
red and rough, her nose shiny, her hair in wisps and not full 
of golden tints as it had been ten years before. But in spite of 
all that, there was a bright, loving light in her eyes even when 
she must be too weary to smile. She had never shown any 
signs of complaint until he had found her crying one morning. 

"Why, Marrha, what's the matter?" he gasped. 

"Oh, George, my chickens. They have something the 
m-matter with them and they are all d-dying. And I did so 
want some more money for a new h-h-hat." 

"There, there, Martha, you'll get your new hat," was all 
he could say. 

"No, I won't, I know. You can't spare any money with 

158 



X3l)e College (Greetings 



the corn and pasture all dried up, and the price of milk where it 
is." 

George was silent. He knew the truth of what she said and 
felt too downcast to protest. There was no merry whistle wafted 
over the dry fields as George followed the plow through the dry, 
hard ground that day. He was busy with very bitter thoughts. 
All he could see ahead was work, work, with discouragement 
and defeat to crown his efforts. If he had only himself to 
think if it would not be so hard — but there was Martha and the 
children. Life here in the heat and dust held nothing for them. 
He must get away. John and Fred, his brothers, were making 
good in the city. Why shouldn't he? 

As he turned his plow back across the field facing the house, 
he viewed with resentment the group of gray buildings sur- 
rounding the snug little farm home. All he could see was the 
fierce sun beating down on the cloud of dust that a passing auto 
had stirred up. He would sell out, buy a nice little suburban 
home, far from dusty country roads, get a job somewhere, and 
not stumble over dry hard clods any more. His mind was ful- 
ly made up when he went home that evening. He didn't know 
why, but he didn't tell Martha. He thought he had better wait 
until he made more definite arrangements. He had a vague feel- 
ing of uneasiness about telling her, too, which he couldn't ex- 
plain. 

After the chores had been done and supper eaten, he went 
out to walk in the yard. He did not see the beauty of the cloud- 
less skies dotted with stars. All that he could see was that there 
was no sign of rain. If it came soon, he might plant some green 
feed which would tide him over the winter. But there was not 
a cloud to be seen. 

Yes, he would go to the city tomorrow and see Creighton, 
the real-estate agent. There was no use trying any more. 

Martha had finished the dishes and now stood beside him. 

"I think I know what is the matter with the chicks," she 

169 



Ob* College Greetings 



said. "Grace Dandon was over this afternoon and she said hers 
acted the same way last year. She gave them some poultry med- 
ic'ne that she has and they got all right. So maybe I won't lose 
many after all. I'm counting on selling that second brood of 
friars next week, and I ought to get twenty-five dollars for 
them." 

Her optimism surprised him, while the thought of the piti- 
ful little twenty-five dollars beside what he would need to car- 
ry him over the winter, made his spirits sink still lower. 

"That's fine Martha. And remember the egg money is 
all yours to use as you wish. I'm going to the city tomorow so 
I can get something if you want me to." 

She looked at him in surprise and said nothing. He won- 
dered if her woman's intuition told her why he was going. 

He came back the next day almost jubilant. 

"I met Creighton today and he said it was just luck that 
I came along when I did. A man came in yesterday wanting to 
buy a farm just like this. He's coming out to look at it next 
week. Martha, we'll sell and go to town. No more hard 
work for you, little mother. I'll get Fred to find a place for me, 
and we'll go away and leave this dry old country and it's work." 

"Why, George, I don't — " she began. 

"Oh, yes you do. Think what it will mean to have a 
weekly pay check that all the droughts in the world won't stop, 
and regular hours, and a real school for the youngsters — " he 
went on painting the advantages of the city life. Martha saw 
the boyish, almost happy look in his eyes. If leaving the farm 
would bring that look back, she would go, and willingly. 

"Well, maybe you're right. I don't care," but she gave a 
little sigh as she said it. 

Then began the preparations for the coming of the pros- 
pective buyer. George Bailey's farm was one of the best kept 
in the neighborhood, but he carefully went over it all to see that 
everything from the house to the farthest fence corner would 
stand inspection. 

160 



Td\)<i College Greetings 



"The only thing it needs to make it look fine is a good rain 
to make the grass green," he thought, almost with pride, as he 
looked out over the dry pasture hills. 

From then on George's attitude toward his farm became 
one of almost utter indifference. He looked at the withered 
corn rows as if to say, "Go on, dry up; I don't care. In a week 
you won't belong to me." The cows that he used to stroke every 
time he passed, now never received so much as a glance. The 
happy look only came to his eyes when he spoke of the home 
he expected to have, or of the work he would do. He had 
written Fred to get him a job, and was confidently awaiting an 
answer. 

With Martha it was different. She loved the farm and hop- 
ed for better days ahead. She felt almost sad when she thought 
of leaving her hens and baby chicks; and as she watched the 
baby calves frisking in the barn lot, she almost choked when she 
thought that the only place one could see a calf in the city was 
in the butcher shop. But if George would be happy there, she 
would be, too. 

Word was received that the buyer was coming on Wednes- 
day. Tuesday night there was heat lightning in the north and 
west. 

"Maybe it will rain tonight," said Martha, as she stood in 
the doorway a moment before going to bed. There was not a 
breath of air stirring. All abroad was that deep, oppressive 
calm that precedes a storm. The silence and the heat seemed to 
weigh on all living things so that not even a katy-did raised its 
voice to break the quiet. 

"No, it won't rain. That's just heat lightning. I don't 
care now if it doesn't. We'll sell tomorow and then it doesn't 
matter." 

"Yes, tomorow night this won't be ours any more," her 
voice held a world of regret. George looked at her quickly. 
She seemed more tried than usual. There were dark rings under 
her eyes, and she leaned heavily on the door. 

161 



Z31)e College (Greeting* 



"Yes, and then no more hard work for us, Martha girl. 
Won't we have a good time though? There'll be shows, and 
parties, and everything we haven't had time for all these years. 
But let's go to bed now, so we can have everything ready by the 
time they get here. You'll give them a chicken dinner, won't 
you?" 

It seemed that they had scarcely fallen asleep when a re- 
verberating roar shook the house. A gust of wind swept 
through the open doors and windows, and then, down came the 
rain. As he rushed about closing windows, George saw the 
waving branches, glistening in the lightning flashes, seeming to 
whisper their relief from the dust and heat. The air was already 
cool and fresh, and smelled of green vegetation. The patter of 
the rain-drops continued all night and the next morning they 
awoke to a new world. No more dust and no more heat for 
awhile. The cows and horses were all slick and clean, and as 
they stood on the pasture hills which were already green, they 
looked as though they had just come from an artist's brush. The 
brook, babbling merrily along reflected the sky overhead which 
was as blue as baby Mary's eyes. Every living thing seemed to 
take deep breaths of the cool, clear air that morning. 

The mail man came at nine o'clock bringing a letter from 
Fred, part of which said, "I don't see any opening here for you. 
We have too many job-seekers now. Better stay on the farm, 
George, it's the best bet just now. I wish I were out there now 
with the youngsters. The city isn't any place for them, es- 
pecially growing boys like yours. There is no place for them 
to play — the streets are so hot — and the sun beats down on 
them so hard it blinds your eyes." 

"But it's rained now," thought George. He had never 
thought about how hot pavement must be. He had only pict- 
ured a shady little suburban yard. 

"Well, if he can't get me a job I'll look somewhere else," 
he thought. The idea of not going never entered his mind. 

A little later the prospective buyer came. George took him 
all over his little domain with pride, but somehow he couldn't 

162 



Orje (TolUge (Greetings 



seem to be enthusiastic about it. All the little "selling" speeches 
he had planned sounded flat. He didn't know what was the 
matter with him. The thought "The city isn't any place for 
them" kept going through his mind as he pointed out the 
boundaries of the farm; the fine pasture land; the spring that 
never became dry; and all the other things a real farmer takes 
pride in. The buyer was delighted and was ready to pay al- 
most any price. He would even buy the stock and implements, 
too. So George showed him the plows, planters, and reapers 
that he had put in readiness the day before, thinking how glad 
he was that he would have to follow them no more. But some- 
how today he almost caressed the skiny plow share, and his 
hand almost trembled when he pointed out the newest device on 
the binder. Then they hunted up the cows in the pasture. Mar- 
tha and the children joined them in the walk across the mead- 
ows. They found the cows under the big sycamore tree on the 
edge of the brook. Their slick black and white sides against 
the green of the grass made a beautiful picture. They were so 
busy hungrily cropping the green grass they had been deprived 
of for so long that they did not even notice the men as they 
walked among them, pointing out something good about each 
one. George's hand lingered careessingly on their sleek sides as 
he patted them and told the buyer how many pounds of milk 
they gave. The baby calves frisked about on the green and they 
came in for their share of praise. Somehow George found him- 
self wishing the man didn't like them so well. He was watching 
baby Mary romping on the grass. "The city is no place for 
them," came into his mind as he watched her. Daisy, the 
youngest calf of the herd, stepping cautiously, went over to the 
little girl, poking its soft pink and gray muzzle into the little 
girl's hand. 

"Pitty Daise-ee", cooed the child. 

"That's a cute youngster you have there, Bailey. All your 
children," he turned to watch the two husky boys of six and 
e-gbt years throwing pebbles into the brook, "look so healthy. 
That comes of living on the farm. That's why I'm getting out 

163 



Z3rj* <£olUge (Greetings 



of town. City streets are no place for growing children. No 
fresh air, no place to play, no green grass — " he waved his hand 
indicating the broad pastures. George's eye followed the gesture 
out across the black loam of the field, and over to the group of 
buildings that meant home. His gaze came back to the sturdy 
boys, the little girl with her arms around the calf's neck, cooing 
in its ear, to Martha who was standing with her hand on his 
arm. 

Creighton must have read the look for he said, "Yes, there's 
all that. But there's less work there, too. You'll find that out 
before long. Well, if we've been over all, we'd better begin to 
talk business." 

George Bailey looked at him as though he were seeing much 
else beside. He was. He was seeing less work behind a desk, 
the same day after day; the same street cars, hustle, and noise; 
he felt the narrowness of a city lot, the solitude of a great crowd. 

Again his eyes swept the land that was his still — Thank 
God — and saw its beauty. 

He turned to the real estate agent. 

"I'm sorry, Creighton, but I believe I won't sell. I've 
changed my mind — unless Martha here would rather." 

"Oh, George, I'd rather stay here than in any suburban 
house in the world!" And she squeezed his arm very hard as he 
said it. 

"Mary loves Daisy," cooed the little maid in the ensuing 
silence. Seeing them both looking at her, she continued, "Don't 
o-o-f 

George Bailey's answer came from the depths of his heart, 
"Yes, darling, but Daddy loves Mary better." 

I mTTTT< > 

We are sorry that due to lack of space we are unable to 
print the stories written by Freshmen which won Special 
Mention in the contest. These are: 

Mary Jane — Claude Craigmiles. 

Dream Boat — Rhoba Philips. 

Granny Martin's Secret — Edythe Hall. 

164 



THE 
AYERS NATIONAL BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. F. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 




DIRECTORS 

ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-President H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

H. C. CLEMENT, Asst. Cashier W. G. GOEBEL, Asst. Cashier 



Member of Federal Reserve Bank 



The Store for 

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NOTIONS 



R^DJOHNS&I>EID f ^ 



The Dunlap 

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John M. Rule, Manager 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN- 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 



Mollenbrok fe? McCullough 



Vlckery's 
..•Colonial 3itit... 

The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Recep- 
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We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any quan- 
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1213 WEST STATE STREET 



Illinois Telephone 93 



Bell Telephone 67 




Andre & Andre 

Everything 
to completely furnish 
the home 

Wallace-Nutting Pictures 
Quality, Service, Satisfaction 

The Best Place to Trade, after all. 



If you want a thing of good report 

Go to the men who the "Greetings" support. 



Smith Federal 
Bakery 



Cleanliness 
is your buy word 

Quality 

is our watch-word 



F. J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
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JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BURTON 



The Home of Better 
Shoe Repairing 

223 WEST MORGAN STREET 



Flash Lights 

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PETERSON BROS, 

320 E. State St. 



Cully Coffee Company 
The Home of Good Coffee 

PHONE 268 222 WEST STATE ST. 

Everything in Dry Goods and 
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coAi.ce FLORETH'S *■{*" 

Trade West Side Dry Goods Co. Trade 

Widmayer's High Grade Meats. Etc. 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 
W. F. Widmaycr C. E. Segner 



He — Don't you go. You are leaving me entirely without 
reason. 

She — I always leave things just as I find them. 

History Question — Give for any one year the number of 
bales of cotton exported from the United States. 

Freshman answer — 1492, none. 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



The Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the Hour 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARE 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lane's Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 

It's Well Worth Considering 

Fancy Box Stationery Program Pencils 

Address Books Wahl Gold and Silver 

Eversnarp Pencils 

313 W. STATE ST. AfU R Roaer^ 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS ** ** • *-*• ^^fe^* ^ 



Use Brazola Coffee 

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Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
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FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
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The styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

FRANK BYRNS ha s t tore 



Economy Grocery 



Quality — Courtesy — Service 

East State Street 



PURE FOODS 

Phone 49 



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The Sanitary 

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Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Loop Cafeteria and 
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POPULAR PRICES 



WEST MORGAN STREET 



Heard in an English Lit. class. 

What caused Shakespeare's period of gloom? 

He got married. 



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FLORETHS 

For Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coats 

Cosgriff's Coffee and Waffle 

Shop 



FAMOUS 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 



WAFFLES 

WEST STATE STREET 



Jos. Burgert 

Dealer in 

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No. 26 

Nortk Side of Square 



DORWARTS 

Cask Market 
CHOICE MEATS 

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Both Phones 196 

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THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORE 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 

74 E. SIDE SQUARE 

Buckthorpe Brothers 

Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
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Schram & Buhrman 
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BOTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



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22-4- E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 

Quality and Service our Motto 




Musie Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1860 



Extension 

Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



JLLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle 
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for a good college. 
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ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




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n n n n 



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Smith Federal Bakery 

BANKS 

Ayers National Bank 
Farrell State Bank 

BOOK STORES— OFFICE SUP'S 

Lane's 

W. B. Rogers 

Book and Novelty Shop 

Ye Booke Shoppe 

CLOTHING STORES 

Frank Byrns' Hat Store 
Myers' Bros. 
Tom Duffner 
Tomlinson 

CONFECTIONERS 

W. S. Ehnie & Bro. 
Bonansinga 
Princess Candy Co. 
Peacock Inn 
Crispette Shop 
Mullenix & Hamilton 
Merrigan 

DOCTORS 

Dr. W. O. Wait 

DRUG STORES 

Armstorog Drug Stores 
Coover Drug Co. 
Gilbert's Drug Stores 

DRY GOODS. READY-TO-WEAR 

C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Floreth's (East Side) 

Floreth's (West Side) 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Co. 

Rabjohn & Reid 

Shanken's 

F. J. Waddell 

DYEING AND CLEANING 

A. E. Schoedsack 
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 

Jacksonville Ry and Light Co. 
Walsh Electric Co. 
Peterson Bros. 

FLORISTS 

Harry Hofmann 
Joseph Heinl & Sons 

FURNITURE STORES 

Peoples' Furniture Co. 
Andre & Andre 



GROCERS 

Economy Cash Market 

Leek's 

Jenkinson-Bode, Wholesale 

Piggly Wiggly 

J. H. Zell 

Vasconcellos 

Cully Coffee Co. 

HARDWARE STORES 

Brady Bros. 
HOTELS 

New Pacific Hotel 
The Dunlap 

JEWELERS 

B as setts 

Schram & Buhrman 

Russell & Thompson 

MEAT MARKETS 

Wiegand 

Widmayer 

Dorwart's Cash Market 

MILLINERY 

H. J. Smith 
Miller Hat Shop 

MUSIC HOUSES 

J. Bart Johnson 
J. P. Brown 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Spieth's Studio 
Mollenbrok & McCullough 

PRINTING 

Courier Company 
Roach Press (East State St) 
Artcraft Printing Office 

RESTAURANTS 

Vickery's Colonial Inn 
Cafe Batz 
Loop Cafeteria 

SECOND HAND STORES 

Easley Second Hand Store 

SHOE SHOP AND REPAIRS 

L. L. Burton 
Jos Burgert 
Hopper & Son 
Mathis, Kamm & Shibe 
Jas. Mc Ginnis 
Edwin Smart Shoe Co. 

THEATERS 

Luttrell's Majestic Theater 

Scotts' 

Rialto 



Box of Fine Stationery 

Hammermill Bond 

250 Sheets of Paper and 250 Envelopes $2.25 

Roach Printing Office 

Opposite Post Office 

WITH THE CAMPUS JOKESTERS 
Rastus — -Yo' done said yo' could lick me. 
Jasper — Umhum, I sho' did; want to see me demonstrate? 
Rastus — No, indeed, Fse just gathering statistics. 

— College of the Pacific Weekly. 



BRADY BROS 

EVERYTHING IN 

Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 

45-47 South Side Square 



MbrcK 

Exclusive Agents 

Hartman Wardrobe Trunks 

Complete Line Hand Baggage 

Mannish 
Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ezard 

The Book ana Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETINGS 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILLE 



I still believe in and sell "QUALITY" foot- 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 



Spietl) Studio 

Photography In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 

Portraiture 

S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

"Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 North Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co, 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready -to- Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



The 

Artcrart Printing 
Office 



213 WEST MORGAN ST. 

Telephone 400 

EMIL HARWEY 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORKS 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388— Bell Phone 98 
'Terms Cash 

J. Bart Johnson Company 

Everything Musical 

49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 

GROCERY 

A good place to get good things 

to eat at a reasonable 

price 

EAST STATE STREET 



AT YOUR SERVICE 

FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 

YOUR FILMS TO US 

jJie Armstrong 

Drug Stores 

QUALITY STORES 

S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State St. 
Jacksonville, 111. 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lane's Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 



It's Well Worth Considering 



Fancy Box Stationery 
Address Books 

313 W. STATE ST. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 



Program Pencils 
Wanl Gold and Silver 
Eversnarp Pencils 

W. B. Rogers 



Use Brazola Coffee 

Sold by 

Jenkinson-Bode Co. 

Coffee Roasters and 

Wholesale Grocers 



Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
EVENING COURIER 

For Today's News 



FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
Catalogues, Pamphlets, Letter- 
Heads, etc., at lowest prices. 



WOMAN'S FURS 

The styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

FRANK BYRNS HA s T TOR E 



Economy Grocery 



Quality — Courtesy — Service 
East State Street 



PURE FOODS 



Phone 49 



Cully Coffee Company 

The Home of Good Coffee 

PHONE 268 222 WEST STATE ST. 



Everything in Dry Goods and 
Millinery 

FLORETH'S 

West Side Dry Goods Co. 



A 

Good Place 

To 

Trade 



A 

Good Place 

To 

Trade 



Widmayer's High Grade Meats, Etc. 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 
W. F. Widmayer C. E. Segner 

A Character Sketch 
I saw his purple tie and I followed him down the street. 
He seemed to flaunt that tie to win smiles from the women and 
as a symbol of freedom. His personality was engaging; bushy 
eyebrows and chin whiskers a bit long and straggly seemed only 
to make him appear more carefree and debonaire. Then a mud 
hole, a slip against a man's trouser leg, a curse, a stone, and poor 
Ragamuffin with a yell of pain dashed down an alley. 

— Margaret Dryden 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



The Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the Hour 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARE 



Shankens 

Woman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
store will give you a better 
idea as to what is new. 


W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 

322-324 East State Street 


SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


J. P. BROWN 

Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 


^Ine Stationery 
an& 

(Btft S\)op tJtovfeltUs 


TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 


19 South Side Square 

Jacksonville 


HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 


H. J. SMITH 

TVULLIINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 
HAND-MADE BLOUSES 

LADIES' HOSIERY 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 


CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



1*7^ *■> 4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

W cUll TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 
FLOWER FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IN 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

Telepkone 59 229 E. State St. 




y& Always — 



) FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

£2llX ^ *™ FOR BRUSHES AND 

UKUb ut *' ' FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT— 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 
OF FOOTWEAR FOR 
%^.#W YOUNG PEOPLE 

We Repair TT f~\ T~> T~> X7^ T3 ^~^ We shine 
Shoes H V>F MT Jr JjJ JtC ^ Shoes 

On the Corner 

For Those W no Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

[ JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies' Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFFNER 

// it's New— We Have It 10 WEST SIDE SQ. 

EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 



Woman's College girls can always find a complete 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Tomlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 



C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

EVERYTHING IIN 

DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 




Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 

TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 

Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH; 

Maae Clean Sola Clean 

EAT 
MORE 
BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us supply tne eats for your next feed 



Tb \) e College (5 r e e t i it 3 5 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 

Kentucky Mountains Sketches 167 

The Party 1 7 1 

Song of the Farmer 172 

Bored 173 

M. Cailland 173 

A New Campus Building 176 

The Magazine We — See 177 

Ophelia Observes Again 179 

College Activities 180 

Much-Talked-of Books 182 

An Appreciation 183 

What is Life? 183 

A Blue Monday 185 

The Latest from Utopia 187 

We, the Scribblers 189 

Fined! Ten Dollars 190 



I 



Ol)« (TolUge Greetings 



IN MEMORY OF 

JANETTE WALLACE 

Class of 1923 
Died April 18, 1923 



"Behold, we know not anything; 
I can but trust that good shall fall 
At last — far off — at last, to all, 
And every winter change to spring/' 



166 



Ol)£ College Greetings 



KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN SKETCHES 

From Railroad to Primitive. 

A traveler leaves the Blue Grass Country in the evening, 
and going southeast finds himself in the midst of the Cumber- 
land mountains by morning. Modern civilization is left be- 
hind as the traveler steps from the train at some desolate looking 
station. His destination is perhaps ten or fifteen miles from the 
railroad, so he looks about for some means of transportation for 
himself and baggage. Soon he is greeted by a small barefoot 
boy with a friendly smile. He is conducted to the "carry-all" 
which proves to be a mule. After packing a small amount of 
baggage in the saddle bags (the rest being left for some uncer- 
tain future time when a wagon can make the trip) the riders 
are off. As they ride along, the stranger is impressed with the 
beauty of the hills with their covering of fine trees and laurel and 
low hanging mist. The road wiggle-waggles over and around 
the hills, always narrow, often sidling, usually rocky. Much of 
the time it follows the creek bed, making frequent fording neces- 
sary. 

Scenery is varied by occasional saw-mills sending out the 
aromatic odor of freshly sawed wood. Now and then a yoke 
of oxen is seen drawing a ramshackle sled of fodder over the bare 
ground, while the driver shouts out his "Gee" and "Haw". 
Mountaineer's cabins are passed with sometimes a flock of cur- 
ious children in the door. Usually there is a large black kettle 
in the yard and a spinning wheel on the porch. Always the 
hills are behind and just ahead, the horizon invisible. Hours 
pass and the journey is at an end. The traveler descends, some- 
what stiffly, from the saddle into new and still more strange ex- 
periences. . i nm 

A Bean Stringin'. 

It is an October evening "just at the edge of dark". There is 
something doing at the Job Hoskins cabin. People are beginning 
to gather and already the place is gay with talk and laughter. 

167 



Ot>e College Greetings 



The event is a neighborhood "bean stringin' " and truly an 
important social occasion. This night there is a trifle more in- 
terest than usual, because two of those new "fotched-in teach- 
ers" are to be present and some amusing blunders on their part 
are expected. In preparation for the event two great stacks of 
beans in the pod are piled, one at each end of the long narrow 
porch. One pile is for the old folks, the other for the younger 
set. As it becomes darker, light is furnished by three or four 
smoking chimneyless coal oil lamps. As the guests arrive they 
are given a choice between "nosin' " and "stringin' " the beans. 
The task of the "nosers" is to break the stem ends off the pods, 
that of the "stringers" to string them by use of needles upon 
long threads so that they can be hung up to dry. The strang- 
ers choose "stringin' ", — "Such a novelty, you know" — and 
wonder why they seem to make such slow progress. For those 
mountain youngster's fingers fly with such lightning swiftness 
that their strings are filled in an incredibly short time. All the 
time "that young imp" Cephas is up to his pranks. Now he is 
letting himself down from the roof, next he is screeching like 
an owl, then hitting some unwary person with a "bean nose". 
Soon "bean noses" are thickly flying through the air. And all 
the time "Maw Hoskins" is pleading in vain with Cephas to 
"stop that fool nonsense". At last the work is done and then be- 
gins the music of the guitar and dulcimer, the stamping of feet 
and clapping of hands, the hum of ballad singers. But soon 
pleasure must end, for the hour grows late and the merry-makers 
take their separate ways into the night. 

A Call upon Aunt Mollie 

Aunt Mollie loves to have company, for she has been a 
cripple and shut-in for the past ten years. She sits in her rickety 
rocking chair today as always. In answer to the inquiry of 
how she is, she gives her usual reply "I ain't much well today." 
She is bent and old. Life and its work and suffering have bow- 
ed her head and made deep wrinkles upon her patient face. Yet 
her hands are busy. Today she is making a corn shuck hat, 

168 



Obe College (Breetlngs 



and there in the corner is a stack of lovely coverlets woven by 
her hands. These suggest by their names tales of old romance. 
There is "King's Delight", "Olive Leaf", "Lover's Knot", 
"Lonely Heart", and others. If we insist, Aunt Mollie will 
sing some old ballads. She does her favorites, "Barbara Allen", 
and "No John No", in her high, quavering mournful voice. 
The floor of her home is bare. The walls are covered with 
catalog leaves. There is little furniture. But Aunt Mollie as 
she smokes her pipe or works with her hands gazes out into the 
purple distances where the mountains fade. Soon another caller 
will climb the crooked steps, and she will greet him with a smile 
and call him "Friend", although his name is Death. 

A Great Excitement 

It is almost time for the afternoon recess at Wooten School, 
on the day of November 2, 1 922. It has been such an ordinary 
day somehow. None of those little unexpected events or remarks 
have happened which so enliven the hours of the school day. 
The bouquet upon the desk is wilted. Faces look distressed over 
problems which refuse to be solved. There is a half suppressed 
restlessness, a tendency to look out of the window, to giggle 
and wriggle. Then it happens! A sound breaks the outside 
stillness and gets the spontaneous attention of every one in the 
room. The teacher gives one look. "Can it be — but no, im- 
possible." Yet it is. In one instant and with one accord those 
fifty youngsters rush out of the door and surround — an auto- 
mobile! Not more than three of four of these children have 
ever seen an automobile before, outside of pictures. They yell, 
jump up and down, and behave quite as if they had lost their 
senses. The center of interest is just a small, dilapidated, wob- 
bly Ford truck. The tires are almost in shreds. The hood is 
off of the chuggy engine. After the car has been climbed upon, 
fingered, inspected, some one discovers that it has a driver. This 
tanned and important person becomes the victim of a rapid fire 
of questions. 

169 



Obe College Greetings 



"Yes siiee," he says, "I've come all the way from Atlanta, 
Georgia in this hyer old rattle trap, and sich roads as I've come 
over I niver v/ant to see again. Here's my old pick axe that's 
helped me get over many a rock, and many's the hill these hyer 
wheels have slid down without turnin' a mite." 

At the insistence of the children, the sputtery engine is 
started again, and before an hour passes every youngster has 
had a never-to-be-forgotten ride up the road and back. The 
day, monotonous in its beginning, has become one of import- 
ance. For months it is to be the chief topic of conversation. 
Events will be spoken of as happening before or after the first 
automobile ever came to Leslie County. Furthermore, it is the 
forerunner of many changes coming to this isolated region, for 

"The ways of the world are a comin' — up Cyar! 

Biled shirts and neckties, 

Powder pots and veils, 

Pizen fotched in liquors. 

Doctor pills and ails- — 

Its a sight, all the brash 

That's comin' — up Cyar!" 

— Helen Paschall '22, Jacksonville. 



Dunne 



Surely, we have attained a high degree of literary independ- 
ence! When we need a play, English or French, Audrey King 
creates for us a gay little piece, or if Spanish, Martha Logan gets 
out her wits and her dictionary; if a pageant, — a different pag- 
eant, Margaret Hamilton combines rhythm and mythology in- 
to a beautiful production. When we come to write our own 
dramatic club plays, the eastern play-wrights who live on royal- 
ties will have to go back to their garrets. We are fast achieving 
dramatic self-sufficiency. 

And then Mary Lois Clark and Audrey King, produced the 
Junior Follies, full of snap and loveliness, composing a song, 
both words and music. We do not copy, we create. 

170 



T5\)t ColUgc (Greetings 



THE PARTY 

By Lucille E. Vick 

Cyril was drunk the night it happened. They were all 
at Red's announcement, (a stag affair), and the young upstart 
brought out his private stock. I do not believe the men were 
dangerously intoxicated — just foolishly so. The tables were 
arranged about the large private pool on the third floor of Red's 
home. The musicians were in a little red canoe drifting about 
on the water. They were girls — beautiful girls clad in scarlet 
bathing suits and caps. They sang as they played, and spoke 
with their eyes as they sang. The girl with the guitar had been 
two years with the Follies. I heard them call her Ethyle. She 
was slender and dark, and she had a lovely wistful smile. Cyril 
had known her before. He brought her to this party and he 
was going to take her home — eventually. The third time the 
canoe passed Cyril I saw her look up at him and rather gravely 
shake her head. The boy put down the glass he had almost to 
his lips, but he made up for that later. 

About three o'clock in the morning the girls left the canoe 
to dress. Cyril waited in the room for Ethyle. The banquet 
tables and the pool had been deserted. Nobody ever learned for 
certain, how things happened. I was in the smoking room and 
suddenly discovered that I had left my cigarette case by my place 
at the tables. I started for it. At the arch of the doorway I 
stopped — Cyril and Ethyle were standing side by side on a 
table. He held a small revolver over his head, and the girl was 
reaching for it. 

"Please, Cyril, put that away! Stop being foolish and 
take me home." 

He was laughing foolishly and his body swayed — "Dive, 
little bird — do a pretty dive. You used to do a pretty one last 
summer — you are my bird, and I say for you to dive!" 

The girl looked at him — frightened. "You won't do 
anything foolish, dear. I had much rather go home; — I'll dive 
once, Cyril, if you'll stop being a fool." As she posed for her 

171 



Z3l)fc College Greetings 



dive Cyril sang — "See the pretty bird! Lord! What a day for 
hunting!" 

Then came the report from his revolver. I'll never believe he 
deliberately pulled the trigger. The girl was in mid-air and 
she hit the water like lead. I dived for her and brought her 
out. By that time the other fellows in the smoking room had 
heard the shot and they came ganging in. We did all we could, 
but the girl died — and Cyril stood there and grinned. 



Dmmc 



THE SONG OF THE FARMER 

He ploughed a field near a country town 

And a right good plougher was he. 
He sang a song as he ploughed along, 

He sang the song for me. 

And the words he sang were words like these, 

"In the spring I plough and sow; 
In the fall I reap, while my faith I keep, 

With a little girl I know." 

He raked the field and he crushed the clod, 

And he sowed the seed in glee, 
He sowed the seed for the world's great need 

But he sang the song for me. 

— Dorotha Staff '26 



172 



<3l)e College (Greetings 



BORED 

For the last half hour she had been trying to analyze her 
own symptoms. Balanced on the end of the bed, with an el- 
bow on her window sill, she just sat, thought, didn't think— sat. 
It was a beautiful day, colorful, with the green of the grass, the 
spring beauties, the warm sun shining on the budded trees, and 
a four mile hike would have taken her to a flower dell. With 
an effort she smiled and shook her head, "No", to an excited 
call for a tennis game. Robin Hood rescued his Lady Marian 
down town in a show; a telephone call lay unanswered on her 
table. Disinterested even in herself, she sat and pulled at a 
string of hair. She was bored, knew it, cared — a little bit, felt 
sorry for herself — a little bit. She sat. 



— Margaret Dryden 



Dunne 



M. CAILLAND 

By Audrey King 

M. Cailland was a holy man. He could not walk along 
the streets of the village without a crowd of children following 
him for his blessing; without their elders bowing obsequiously 
to him, and murmuring among themselves, "A holy man! A 
holy man, truly!" 

M. Cailland looked a holy man. He was old with snow 
white hair; tall, but a little bent; well built, but gaunt as from 
much fasting. He wore only old clothes, and his long cape 
and pointed hat gave him much of the appearance of a priest. 

And M. Cailland acted a holy man. He was rich, but 
what widow had not received of his wealth, what poor orphan 
had not had of his bounty? And had he not given freely to the 
Church? Had he not helped all who needed aid? Truly, he 
made good use of his wealth. And what part did he keep for 
himself? Why, he lived more frugally than most of his peas- 
ants — in that great dismal house with only old Jean and Jean's 
wife to care for him — alone always. He surely spent his time 

173 



I3l)e College (Brettlngs 



in fasting and prayer. But no one could say as to that with 
certainty. M. Cailland received no visitors. No one but the 
nephew from Paris had been inside the grounds for years. But 
that was only further proof of M. Cailland's goodness. He was 
living the life of a hermit. Ah, a holy man! A holy man, truly! 
And old Marie, Jean's wife, told tales to prove M. Cail- 
land's holiness. Why, Monsieur was in communication with 
the holy saints! Sometimes music would rise and float from 
the very walls; and, at other times, there would be the sound of 
soft voices coming from nowhere, it seemed. And often times 
Monsieur would stay in his room for days at a time, would take 
no food for a whole week, would not allow himself to be dis- 
turbed for any reason. And when his nephew came, did he not 
upbraid him for his loose, worldly ways, his gay life in Paris? 
Ah, Monsieur was a holy man! Monsieur was a saint! Did not 
the angel voices prove it? 

* * * * 

It was winter and M. Cailland was old. But nevertheless, 
he allowed himself no ease. He visited the poor in the most in- 
clement weather; he lived as frugally as ever. But now the hard 
life began to tell. One day M. Cailland was confined to his 
bed. He seemed in a terrible delirium. He had a raging fever. 
His nephew was sent for. The townspeople crowded to his 
home for news of him. And all the while M. Cailland raged in 
a delirium. 

He said strange things. He would cry out with seeming 
mirth, "A holy man! A holy man, truly! Ha! Ha! A holy man! 
Celestine, can you love a holy man?" 

And then while the people cowered at such ravings, the 
nephew arrived. He rushed to the bedside, crying, "My uncle! 
My uncle!" and M. Cailland sat up in bed and greeted him. 

"Ah, good evening, my nephew. You come in good time. 
I am glad you are here." Then in a softer voice with a silly smile 
and mysterious rolling of the eyes — "They think your uncle is 
a holy man! A holy man! Ha! Ha!" And he laughed aloud. 
Then softly tittering, "A holy man! They are not wise." 

174 



T5hz College (Brcctmgs 



He held bis nephew's hand and arm and plucked at them 
constantly. "Ah, and the music! That was holy music! Ah yes, _ 
holy music. And the soft voices! Ha! Ha! Do all soft voices be- 
long to saints, my nephew?" 

Again M. Cailland laughed his horrid laugh. M. Cailland's 
eyes were insanely bright. He mumbled and tittered like a do- 
tard. 

"Ah, the soft voices! Soft voices — and the music! Those 
two are from Heaven of course." Here his voice became a hoarse 
whisper. 

"Here. Take this. Look at it, sometime." 

He slipped a tiny scroll into his nephew's hand and then 
tittering and chuckling, he fell back and in a few minutes, died. 

M. Cailland was buried with great pomp. He was named 
a saint in spite of the horror of his last moments. 

After the funeral, the nephew returned to the cheerless 
house and after ordering lights and food, sat down before the 
fire of his uncle's apartment and perused the scroll. It was a 
simple diagram showing the position of a private passageway 
leading from the room. The nephew wondered. His uncle's de- 
lirium had been very strange for a holy man. Very. Well, the 



passage way 



He found it easily. It led to a suit of rooms sumptiously 
furnished and with every evidence of being occupied. He passed 
through the drawing room into the boudoir beyond. A beauti- 
ful creature reclined at ease on the divan. She turned at the 
sound of his steps. 

"Paul," she cried in suprise. "You!" 

"Celestine!" exclaimed the Parisian as to an old acquaint- 
ance. Then, bowing low, "My uncle has excellent taste." 

"Thank you," said the courtesan. "How is he?" 

"He is dead and buried," said Paul. 

"Ah, a holy man. A holy man, truly," murmured Celes- 
tine. "Eh bien, I suppose you are his heir." 



175 



Ot)e College (Breetlngs 




A New Campus Building 

"Do call on us," said Madam Wren 
To Mrs. Thrush one day. 

"Now that spring moving's over. 
I think we're fixed to stay. 

We like the place, — it's well built — modern- 
Has a lovely yard. 

We're in the Senior Duplex, 
On Back Campus Boulevard." 



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ol)£ College Greetings 



THE MAGAZINES WE— SEE 

Alma Blodget gives this as a result of actual interviews at 
local magazine stands. 

"Magazines? Yes, we keep quite a few." The clerk waved 
his hand at the racks full of them. There they were — every size, 
color and name, — the dignified Atlantic Monthly, the brilliant 
Red Book, the lurid True Confessions and a hundred others. 

"We sell some of every kind. The American is the best sel- 
ler; you'll find that anywhere. Red Book comes about second 
and then the Ladies Home Journal and Woman's Home Com- 
panion are the biggest favorites. Saturday Evening Post is pretty 
popular; some women buy it but the most of its purchasers are 
men. American and Red Book readers are more evenly divided. 
True Stories goes pretty fast. I don't read it myself, and don't 
think it amounts to anything, but some people want it. The 
same ones who go to sensational movies want that kind of read- 
ing material. I almost said literature, but you couldn't call 
much of this stuff literature. There are others of the same type. 
Telling Tales, True Confessions, Hearst's, Young's, and others; 
but we don't sell many of them, — say five — while we sell fifty 
Americans and twenty-five True Stories. The same people don't 
buy them all the time. Frequently they are just "pick up" 
reading or the picture on the cover stands out so much that they 
feel impelled to buy. 

"Radio magazines are mighty popular just now. There 
are a number of different ones on the market to suit the most 
amateur fan or the real professional. They all go like hot cakes. 
There's a call too for other technical magazines. Scientific 
Monthly is rather popular. Draughtsmen's journals, engineer- 
ing, agricultural and other magazines have a limited sale for 
one class. 

"Yes, we keep reviews like World's Work, Current Opinion 
and Literary Digest, but they don't sell very fast. That isn't 
an indication that they aren't read, for the people who want 
them usually subscribe for them by the year. They want to be 
sure of getting them and don't like to take the risk of purchas- 

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Z5^<t College (Brettings 



ing them when they come out at a book store. The same is true 
of Atlantic Monthly, The Dial and others of more literary type; 
I'd hate to have the number we sell a basis of judgment of the 
number read. 

"Life and Judge always sell well: so does Whizz Bang. 
More people subscribe for the other two than for Whizz Bang. 
It isn't as good for a steady diet. 

"If a man comes in for two magazines, what will he take? 
That depends on where he is going. If it's home, he'll get 
something for himself — American, Saturday Evening Post — and 
a woman's magazine for his wife. If it's for himself alone he 
takes perhaps Review of Reviews and American. The same man 
never takes Current Opinion and Hearst's. If he wants some- 
thing light he'll take Life or Judge. The only combination 
with Hearst's is another magazine of the same type. None of 
them combine with the Century or Atlantic Monthly. 

"Movie magazines are always popular. People who attend 
all movies have to keep up on the inside life of their favorites, 
Naturally we don't keep every magazine published. There is no 
call for some in a place like this, and it doesn't pay us to keep 
them on hand, even if we can return those we don't sell." 

There were still lots of magazines we hadn't mentioned. 
Many of them were dismissed as unworthy of comment. "I 
don't read them — don't think they're worth wasting time on — 
but some people want them, so we keep them." 

Magazine popularity is a strange thing, isn't it? Do you 
suppose that Addison or Steelse ever had any idea what the mod- 
est beginnings of the Tatler and Spectator would lead to? They 
can't be very proud of some of their successors, but how they 
must glory in others! 



"> » '"" < > 



"I had an awful fright last night." 
"Yes, I saw you with her." 

— Iowa Wesleyan News. 

178 



Orjc College (Breetings 



OPHELIA OBSERVES AGAIN 

We knew that Roger Carter would keep his promised 
Was'nt it a glorious serenade he and Ben O'Conner gave us? I 
love best that tragic strain with the theme, "He shall die! He 
shall die!" They haunted me, those lines, in the same peculiar 
manner that Mark Twain was possessed by the jingle 

"Punch, brother, punch with care; 

Punch in the presence of the passenjare." 
On my way to class or at the table, I mutter to myself, 
"He shall die! die! die!" causing my neighbors to cast wonder- 
ing glances. If I could remember more of the song these dis- 
turbing lines might be varied. Perhaps Roger and Ben will 
come again, and we will rouse the inhabitants of Tin Can Alley, 
who were so angry at missing this last serenade. Again, to the 
singers, our appreciation and expectation. Others have come in 
the meantime, but we demand the genuine. 

And all our own little plans for serenading are ruined! 
Faithfully on Saturday morning we warbled "Jingle Bells", 
thinking that some warm spring night it would be so sweet and 
appropriate to sing it to the School for the Deaf. But Wood- 
son in his zeal for order consigned the copies to destruction. I 
hope I never leave my history note book in the chapel window. 

You know Woodson's Airdale dog? Big as the side of a 
barn. Homely as a mud fence. He lives with Woodson in 
Music Hall basement. The other day Woodson appeared from 
these regions. His expression was not agreeable, and his lan- 
guage was not mild. On being questioned, he exploded: "That 
damn dog! He chawed up mah shoes, he chawed up mah breech- 
es, an' now he gone an' chawed up mah Bible!" But Woodson 
should take comfort in the thought that anything as full of re- 
ligion as that Airdale is now will not chaw anything again. 

While making radios, Mr. Wackerle might construct one 
which would allow the people on the back chapel rows to know 
what was being said on the stage. Or a course in lip reading 
might be given. 

179 



T5\)t (College (Breetings 



Vol. XXVI. Jacksonville, lll t May, 1923 No. 8 

STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 

Editor-in-chief Margaret Fowler 

Associate Editor Alma Blodget 

Business Manager Elson Pires 

Assistant Business Manager Avis Murphy 

Junior Editor Dorothy Dean 

Sophomore Editor Dorothy Dieman 

Sophomore Business Manager Mae Virgin 

Art Editor Ethyl Keller 

Faculty Adviser Miss Neville 



COLLEGE ACTIVITIES 

The other day I heard a girl remark that she had several 
college mementoes she was saving to hand down to her grand- 
children. I had visions of hearing about the usual things we 
put in our Memory Books, but instead she informed me she was 
to bequeath to her posterity her English History note-book and 
her date book. Rather astonished at hearing of such a thing as 
a "date book" at the Woman's College, I couldn't refrain from 
inquiring further. Thereupon I was informed that her date 
book was the book in which she kept the times of committee 
meetings, advisory council, Glee Club, Madrigal, Dramatic, 
French and Spanish rehearsals and all the other things that she 
had to attend. Then I understood. 

Perhaps she exaggerated a bit in her enumeration of her 
activities, but the question of the place of "outside" work is 
worthy of consideration. We all admit that college activities 
are the life of the school, but when they become burdensome 
to a few girls who seem to have duties in connection with every- 
thing, there ought to be reformation. 

Some girls, — ( (shall we say unfortunately?) get the repu- 
tation of being reliable and trustworthy and full of good ideas. 
As a reward for these to-be-coveted traits, they serve on com- 

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T5\)£ College Greetings 



mittees of every description, play on or manage athletic teams, 
lead Y Dub, champion Endowment movements, take part in 
English, French or Spanish plays, — in short give all their time, 
spare or otherwise, to college activities. 

"Wonderful, wonderful, activities!" 

"Happy girl to be able to develop her abilities." 

But this same girl as a reward, — or is it a punishment 
for her reliability, comes home from a meeting or rehearsal at 
eleven P. M., turns on the light, and while her lucky room- 
mate revels in slumber, opens her books, one after another, try- 
ing to get a smattering knowledge of the work for the five classes 
she has the next day, before she finally succumbs to her weari- 
ness. Add to this the uncomfortable feeling which comes to 
us all that next day in class as a result of unpreparedness, and 
where is the happiness and joy in college activities? 

But she doesn't like to refuse flatly when she is asked to 
serve on a committee; she doesn't want to shirk her duty as a 
loyal student, so she still works and gives half-time to lessons. 

Our point system takes care of the more important offices, 
but all the decoration, program, and social committees are not 
included in that. No point reward or grade comes as a result 
of strenuous committee work, and yet this takes as much time 
as some of the more important offices. 

Of course we do not wish that college activities should be 
done away with, but all will agree that parts in outside affairs 
should be distributed more evenly. Every girl should be given 
the opportunity to learn how to manage committees. To this 
end, committee work should not be confined to a few, but dis- 
tributed so that every girl may develop her ability in that line. 
In other activities, let each one choose, and not try to join every 
organization. 

If we adopt this policy of giving the unused student a 
chance to try her perhaps equal abilities, even at the expense of 
a few failures, we shall soon see an advance in scholarship of 
the over-burdened few. 

— £. M. 

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Z3be College (Greeting* 



MUCH-TALKED-OF BOOKS 

So far this year the two publications that are probably 
most interesting to college students are the much-talked-of 
Town and Gown by Lois and Lynn Montrose and a more re- 
cent book The Barb by Wm. McNally. The two deal with col- 
lege life in the manner in which Sinclair Lewis treated Gopher 
Prairie: an unimpassioned statement of conditions. As Main 
Street brought home to the American people the defects of the 
small town, these two books, it is to be hoped, will bring a 
realization of the outstanding faults of the universities. But 
whether you take up the two books with the idea of being en- 
tertained or with that of social reform, you will find them equal- 
ly readable. 

The former. Town and Gown, is composed of a number 
of short stories about different phases of university life — some 
of which are rather appealing in their frank statement of facts, 
yet they have been written by two people who wrote from ob- 
servation. The stories are as well-written as they are interesting, 
which makes them very desirable indeed. Still the book is be- 
ing demanded mainly because every university student (aside 
from other interested persons) is saying, "Have you read what 
they have written about us? Are we going to deny it — or 
what?" 

The other book, The Barb, relates the experiences of a man 
coming from the culture of a European school to the common- 
placeness, the almost-vulgarity of a Mid-Western University. 
He sees the sham, the snobbery, the futility of it all, and con- 
sequently decides to live the life of a "barb". 

The two present serious problems for the college man and 
woman to think about, and have, as well, genuine literary value. 

— Dorothy Dieman. 

CZZZMUUKZZID 

Maurine Gilpin has a novel way of making money. She 
will wash behind your ears, five cents per ear, three for a dime. 

182 



X31k (Tollcge (Greetings 



AN APPRECIATION 

It is the months of drafting, surveying, estimating — not the 
spectacular piling together of materials, — that builds the great 
building. It is the work, pondering, planning, prayer, work, 
of month after month, — not a brief campaign for funds, — 
that builds a school. We give our tribute to one who works 
day and night, quietly. Dr. Harker will be remembered by 
many of us as he sits at his desk, busy and not seeming to tire. 



Dunne 



WHAT IS LIFE? 
By Ruth B. Espatza 

Visiting the pyramid and obelisk's city, I went into Phar- 
aoh's place. A heavy cloud of incense was enveloping the gran- 
ite columns and statues of the great saloon where the king was 
seated on his high throne of gold and ivory. Priests in white 
linen and warriors with helmets and resplendent shields and 
lances were around him. 

All of them were contemplating some dancing women, 
who, following the melancholy harmony of flutes, lyres and 
drums, fluttered on nimble feet in very delicate agitation or 
twisted their bodies in graceful contortion. 

Suddenly, the lowing of a sacred ox sounded, and there 
was a holy terror in all from the king down to the dancers and 
musicians; but when the sacred ox became quiet, the dance be- 
gan anew. 

Oh! how beautiful they were in their Egyptian dresses 
which reflected lights and colors of their jewels. At that time, 
God help me, I recognized some of them. The dancers — Vona 
Cleveland, Donnabel Keys, Charlotte Rodgers and Audrey King! 
And the musicians — Marie Luke, Beulah Farnham, Ruth Bis- 
hop, and whistling, Joe Rink. 

I never was so surprised as when I met the assistant of 
Hipparcus at the great Observatory of Alexandria in white tunic 
and with veiled head, writing a poem to Osiris. Who is he? — 
Margaret Fowler! 

183 



T3ht (Tollegc Greetings 



Beyond the city, in the desert, through the burning sand, 
Catharine Stevenson and Margaret Kuhne are before the Sphinx 
asking her: How many children and how many generations will 
we send to I. W. C? 

Near the Cheop's pyramid was Elva Becker bathed in tears, 
and saying to herself, "Now, here is my tomb all ready; but it 
will cost seventy-five dollars to embalm my body — and I have 
only five." 

Suddenly with a noble gesture she stood up and said: "I 
shall work until I have those seventy-five dollars." Just at that 
minute a white cumulus cloud descended and from it came out 
two tender faces and they kissed her. Lucille Morris and Sarita 
Jones! 

There was a palace near the great temple of Karnak, and in 
it was a magnificent saloon tapestried with purple velvet and 
with a rich carpet. At the right side of the saloon was a lux- 
urious divan where were lying some distinguished maidens with 
diadems in their hair, collars around their necks, and bracelets 
on their wrists and ankles. 

What are doing? 

Embroidering a tunic for the priest. 

Who are they? Mildred Waldron, Mary Alice Harper and 
Zenith Homberger! 

Oh! what am I seeing now? Nymphs — wrapped in in- 
tangible veils and holding in their mouths torches, that emit 
torrents of diamonds over the tranquil surface of the water! 
They are swimming under the blue sky of Egypt into the em- 
erald of the Nile. Ah! Winnie Potter, Janette Meridith, Elean- 
or Dowd, Helen Bly, Beatrice . 

In that moment the seven-thirty bell rang and I had missed 
my breakfast. 

"What is life? A dream." 



184 



Ol>e College (Breetlngs 



A BLUE MONDAY 
By ifaf/? Beac/? 

Monday morning, the only morning in the week you can 
sleep late she wakes up, that chronic Pollyanna, because she 
thinks it is a shame to let such a beautiful day go to waste. "Mr. 
Gallagher and Mr. Shean" heralds her coming. She is happy. 
So would you be if she would only let you sleep. She rushes in- 
to your room and insists that you get up and go to breakfast 
with her. You have nearly fifteen minutes to get dressed and 
down stairs to the dining room. You get up, because you 
know that if you don't she'll stay and keep you awake anyway. 
Where's that elusive tooth brush? Ah, here it is behind your 
dresser on the floor. Your room mate must have put it there — 
you can always blame your room mate for putting things where 
you can't find them. While you are thus occupied the kind 
friend who woke you up is around cheering up everyone else on 
the corridor who feels badly about having been awakened so 
early. 

At last you are ready and have about three minutes to get 
to the dining room. You dash down and have the agonizing 
experience of reaching the bottom of the steps just as the bell is 
ringing and the door being closed. Your watch was slow. But 
Pollyanna friend says, "Oh well, cheer up Mary, I bet they had 
something we don't like anyway". Now I ask you, if that isn't 
enough to spoil an otherwise perfectly good day. But you are 
heroic about it and try to squeeze out a smile. Then she tells 
you. on the way back upstairs, that she can't undersand how 
anyone can possibly have such a terrible disposition as her room 
mate has. All that she did to her was to call her two or three 
times and try to pull her out of bed, to go down to breakfast 
with her. Said room mate apparently didn't care to go to 
breakfast or to be helped out of bed either and told her to get 
out and leave her alone and added further that she didn't care 
whether she ever ate or not, but she did want to sleep and wish- 
ed she would get out and let her do so. 

You have come to the door of your room — and escape. 

185 



Z3l)4 College (Greetings 



Inside you find your room mate, who has just lifted her flower 
head from the soft down of the pillow and is sitting up in bed, 
many pillows behind her, reading the morning mail. Between 
gasps of ecstacy she tells you that her sister has just received the 
most marvelous diamond and the man she is engaged to took 
her to the most wonderful frat dance the other night and she 
said — finally you get in a word and ask for your mail. There 
are several letters lying beside her on the bed. They are hers; 
you have none. 

You sit down to the study table to work on that English 
History note-book. The Treaty of Wallingford 1174, The 
Doomsday Survey 1088 and "Oh Mary! listen to me, they 
have already decided to go to California on their honeymoon." 
Your room mate is tearing up everything on your dresser look- 
ing for the hair pins and net that you used by mistake this 
morning. Stony silence and concentration on your part. Seeing 
that she will get no response from you she goes across the hall 
to tell the glad news to Helen and Bernice. You struggle for an 
hour trying to memorize kings and dates, (those pertaining to 
history). The bunch has decided to go down town for break- 
fast. But never mind, they'll be back pretty soon to talk to 
you. They are back. They tell you to forget the gloom; 
there's no reason for you to act that way just because you didn't 
get a letter from your best man. They wouldn't. They all got 
one. 

Lunch time — nothing you like. After lunch your room 
mate and Helen and Bernice decide to go to the movies. You 
can't go — that history note book as well as a little matter of 
about fifteen pages of Lit. is staring you in the face. When you 
are half through studying the bunch returns. They have some 
French translation to do and it must be done before dinner, so 
they will come in and sit on your bed and read it out loud. This 
helps a lot, especially in the matter of memorizing the periods 
of Shakespeare's works. 

Dinner time. Everybody is talking about the movie you 
missed. "Wasn't it thrilling? and oh, those soulful eyes, and 

186 



O^c College (Greetings 



wasn't she darling in the last scene?" After dinner you go out 
with a couple of friends to walk around the campus for a few 
minutes before finishing that Lit. As you come back into the 
building, you meet your room mate coming down stairs. She 
stops long enough to tell you not to study too hard, and "Oh 
yes, I borrowed your coat and hat and gloves because I'm hav- 
ing a date and knew you weren't and wouldn't care a bit." 
As you go on past one of the society halls, someone is playing 
"The End of a Perfect Day". 



onnnc 



THE LATEST FROM UTOPIA 

Being news items concerning those of our faculty who are 
dwelling in that land where ambitions are realized. 

Utopia, May i, 19 — 

Dr. Evelyn Anderson is defending herself in court on the 
charge of having put a patient to sleep by radio bed time stories. 
Dr. Anderson claims that the man is worth more dead than alive 
and has witnesses to the effect that he has a life insurance. 

Miss Swanson after these years has power to assume any 
form. She believes her mission in life is to perfect the golf stroke 
so she will usually be found in the form of a golf stick. This 
is the only way in which she can wreak the proper vengeance on 
the wayward ball. A new feature of the game as played in 
Utopia is the speed cop caddy improvement. Occasionally Miss 
Swanson assumes the form of a pen. Detectives are secretly work- 
ing to discover what she writes. 

Miss Lobdell is demanding more poor people in Utopia. 
Her social service committee is idle half the time, and some of 
them have resorted to chewing gum for amusement. 

Miss Teague just escaped a serious accident the other day. 
She was swimming rapidly down the River, for she was to meet 
a friend for lunch at the Pie Plate. As the sea weeds were grow- 
ing so close to the sides of the road she did not see around the 
curve. She unceremoniously bumped straight into a shark. The 
accident was unavoidable and both parties escaped without in- 

187 



X3^e College (Greetings 



jury. After apologies they became very much interested in each 
other. Miss Teague learned that Mr. Shark could speak French 
fluently and so invited him to sit down on the road side bench. 
Miss Teague refuses to relate what happened when her friend 
came in search of her. From all reports we gather that she 
will eat nothing but pancakes. 

Choir Wanted — Preferably men — Miss Whitmer. 

Miss Johnston has just returned from a camping trip giv- 
en by Rudyard Kipling. She reports that Mrs. Kipling is a cat. 

The engagement of Miss Abbott and Mr. Limited Subject 
does not surprise us. We offer our most sympathetic congratu- 
lations. Miss Abbott was heard to whisper to her maid that 
she did not like Slang Words. As Mr. Subject is giving a recep- 
tion for Mr. Words the last of May something interesting may 
happen. We will print further details in our next issue. 

Mr. Weber reports that he found his Bible. He recom- 
mends that all Utopians use red and blue pencils for underscor- 
ing. Without the American Eagle pencil marks Mr. Weber 
would never have been able to identify his Book. 

In behalf of some psychological experiments Mrs. Weber 
has been imprisoned for a few days on the pretense of having 
committed suicide. At the end of this time she will be hung at 
sunrise for at least ten minutes. If those present will pay close 
attention they may get some interesting notes. This is not a 
punishment for Mrs. Weber's sins but it is for psychological re- 
search in the impressions and experiences of a criminal. A special- 
ly made Utopian Retaker will record all thoughts and feelings 
of this generous woman as they take place. 

Miss Merriman has been suspended from the University of 
Utopia, where she is getting information on how to fill a Hope 
Chest. It is reported that she refuses to cut off her beautiful 
curls when it is an unwritten law at the institution that all in- 
mates should have bobbed hair. We are interested in the result,— 
will Miss Merriman comply with the wishes of the school or 
will she give up her life work? 

188 



Ol)* Collie <Breetlngs 



WE, THE SCRIBBLERS 

We were horrified to hear a Soph ask, "What is this 'Scrib- 
blers', anyway? Isn't it a class for freshmen who are defici- 
ent in English?" 

Shades of Bernard Shaw and Amy Lowell! We had meant 
to be exclusive. We had hoped to be advertised, not by an- 
nouncement, but "by our loving friends". It appears, how- 
ever, that in this unromantic age we must seek the publicity of 
the press, and classing ourselves with the manufacturers of tooth 
paste and underwear, tell you of our charms in print. 

Scribblers is a society of scribes for the purpose of scribbu- 
lation. Some of the students, it seems, are cursed with ideas, 
emotions, that will not be expressed in music, art or dramatics, 
but insist on shaping themselves into words. The resulting in- 
fant sketch, poem or story seems to its creator a thing of signi- 
ficance and beauty. But realizing that mother love may be 
blinding her eyes, she brings the child of her brain for the kind- 
ly but critical appraisal of similarly creative friends. That is 
Scribblers. 

We meet when we please, where we please, and stay as long 
as we please, discussing the race question — hero worship — any- 
thing suggested by the reading of our manuscipts, and usually 
speaking of the possibilities shown in the submitted material of 
some anonymous candidate for membership. For we do not 
flatter ourselves that our circle includes all the literary genius of 
the school. Four freshmen candidates were recently accepted, 
and besides these we number three sophomores, five juniors and 
two seniors. Among two hundred and fifty there are surely 
more than fourteen who write well, and though we hope that 
Scribblers will not grow much larger than it is now, it is always 
a joy to find that some unsuspected person shares our desire — 
to write with vividness, originality and truth. — M. F. 

We — Who is that fellow with the long hair? 

She — He's a fellow from Yale. 

We — Oh, I've often heard of those Yale locks. — Ex. 

189 



T5I)& College (Breetings 



FINED! TEN DOLLARS. 
By Alice Bar wise 

Richard Harley steered the car with ease as it rather leisure- 
ly ate up the smooth hard road between St. Louis and Charles- 
ton Woods. How he loved the whirr of the engine and the 
touch of the wheel. His slightest turn directed the car easily in- 
to the path he wished. According to his custom only one hand 
was on the wheel — his left hand. His other arm encircled the 
shoulders of a young lady. 

Charlotte had chatted away in her usual bright way as they 
left the city. Soon, however, her words had become mere re- 
sponses to Dick's questions. Finally, not even getting a re- 
sponse, Dick peeked under Charlotte's hat and found her eyes 
closed. She was far away in the Land of Nod. 

Dick put his arm cautiously around her, trying not to dis- 
turb her. Thus he protected her from the jar of the car. 

The night was a beautiful one. The moon looked like the 
white tip of a tiny fingernail. The stars sparkled gloriously, 
All was still. The only sounds which reached Dick's ears were 
the steady beating of the engine and Charlotte's breathing. 

He glanced down at her. Such a delicate, sweet girl she 
was. The wind played with her curly golden hair, which had 
slipped from the hold of the little blue turban. As he looked at 
her Dick realized how much he loved her. Indeed, she was a 
girl any man would be proud to marry. 

Just as these thoughts were idly chasing themselves around 
in Dick's mind his eyes suddenly saw lights from a car behind 
reflected in the mirror which he kept above the wind-shield. 
"Let them pass," he thought. But the car didn't pass. It chugged 
along directly behind him. Impatiently it seemed to say, 
"Move along, I'm in a hurry." 

Dick's first impulse was to speed up. A glance at the 
speedometer showed thirty-five miles. No speeding beyond law 
for him. Then he suddenly realized that it was nothing but 
those tricky speed cops, anyway. When business was dull they 

190 



Z3b* (TolUgc (Brcetings 



tried to scare up some. Since they worked on a commission 
basis it paid them well to do so. 

And here they were trying to bully Dick. If he weren't up 
to their tricks the rasping rattle of their car would tantalize him 
until he would speed up. Then they would triumphantly 
drive up beside him and yell at him. One of them would jump 
onto his fender and say, "Yep! Forty-five. I knew it!" Dick had 
had to bail himself out more than once for just such foolhardi- 
ness. But no more for him. He was on to them. 

So he allowed his car to go on at an even rate. He even 
forgot his assailants as he rode on. The wind brushed his 
cheek delightfully. And Charlotte lay relaxed within his arm. 

His reveries were disturbed by a car passing him. Hearing 
a rattle he looked to see the well-known grey Ford of a speed 
cop. "That's the time you didn't catch me," triumphantly 
thought Dick to himself. 

The tiny grey thing went ahead about fifty yards. Then 
it halted. Dick was passing it in his leisurely fashion when a 
man stuck out his head and yelled, "Stop! You're arrested." 

"Ha, ha!" laughed Dick. "Not much this time. This is the 
one time I didn't step on the gas. You'd better try someone 
else." 

"Aw, shut up. You're pinched for one-armed driving." 

Dick gasped. He glanced down at Charlotte. Here she 
was, sleeping peacefully on, quite oblivious to all about her. 

"But I — " Dick started to say when the cop interrupted 
him with the gruff command to drive to the police station or 
someone else would do it for him. 

So Dick let out the brakes and followed dociley the grey 
streak before him. At any rate he exceeded thirty-five miles 
per hour. But he couldn't blame the cops — of course they 
were eager to get back on the beat again. 

Arrived at the police station Dick gently shook Charlotte's 
shoulders. She opened her big blue eyes. "Oh, home already?" 

"Hush, dear. We're at the police station. I'm pinched. 
You'd better wait here in the car until I get back." 

191 



Obfit College (Breetings 



"All right." She smiled and languidly lay back. She had 
been with Dick before when he was similiarly summoned. 

Dick followed the officers into the court room. The Judge, 
seeing him, greeted him with an amused smile. 

'In too much of a hurry again, Hartley? Don't you pre- 
fer other ways of spending your hard-earned cash?" 

The officer walked up, saluted, and said, "Arrested for one- 
arm driving, your honor." 

"Oh." The Judge took a long breath and arching his eye- 
brows cast a suprised glance at Hartley. "So?" 

"Guilty," declared Dick. 

"Where's the young lady?" inquired the judge. 

"Out in the car." 

"Well, well. Too bad, Hartley, but this is rather serious. 
The fine is ten dollars. It wasn't designed for men like you. 
But you'll have to pay, I guess." 

Dick took out his leather wallet and slowly extracted a 
twenty-dollar bill. 

"Can you change this?" A tiny smile played around the 
corners of his mouth as the judge returned a ten-dollar bill to 
him. 

"Good night, Hartley. Don't let this happen again, my 
boy." 

"Oh that's all right. Although I'll admit it is rather a 
new experience, this paying ten dollars for having one's arm 
around one's sister." 



Dnimc 



Pleasant Polly (entertaining big sister's beau) — "Oh, Ad- 
olphus guess what father said about you last night." 
Adolphus — "I haven't an idea in the world." 
Pleasant Polly — "Oh shame! you listened." 

— Willamette Collegian. 



192 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN- 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 



Mollenbrok & McCullough 



Vickery's 
♦♦♦Colonial 3nn*.* 

The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Recep- 
tions and Luncheons 

We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any quan- 
tity. We also serve dinners,when reservation is made in 
advance. 

. 1213 WEST STATE STREET 
Illinois Telephone 93 Bell Telephone 67 




Andre & Andre 

Everything 
to completely furnish 
the home 

Wallace-Nutting Pictures 

Quality, Service, Satisfaction 

The Beat Place to Trade, after all. 



If you want a thing of good report 

Go to the men who the "Greetings" support. 



Smith Federal 
Bakery 



Cleanliness 
is your buy word 

Quality 

is our watch-word 






"The Home of Crispette" 

The Sanitary 

Pop-corn and 
Crispette Shop 

Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Loop Cafeteria ana 
Care 



POPULAR PRICES 



WEST MORGAN STREET 



COME TO— 

FLORETHS 

For Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coats 

Cosgriff's Coffee and Waffle 
Shop 

FAMOUS 2C3C WAFFLES 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE WEST STATE STREET 



Jos. Burgert 



Deal 



er in 



G oo d Shoes 



No. 26 

North Side of Square 



DORWART'S 

Cash Market 

CHOICE MEATS 

OF ALL KINDS 

Both Phones 196 
No. 230 WEST STATE STREET 



CAFE CONFECTIONERY 



For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Out Fountain 

CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELER'S FANS 

JACKSONVILLE Ry, & LIGHT CO. 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
T. A. Chapin, Vice-President £. A. Chapin 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j[ g.' Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

GILBERTS DRUGSTORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 



F. J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
popular fancies of Late Fashion, always featuring the 
youthful lines so becoming, displayed daily in our Ready- 
to-Wear Section. 

Dresses Coats Suits Skirts Furs 
Negligees Silk Underwear Blouses Lingerie 

F. J. Waddell & Company 



VOU will be pleased with our fine line of 
Jewelry and Silverwear 

Gifts That Please . . . 

RUSSELL & THOMPSON 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BURTON 



The Home of Better 
Shoe Repairing 

223 WEST MORGAN STREET 



Flash Lights 

and 

Batteries 

PETERSON BROS, 

320 E. State St. 






THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORE 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 

74 E. SIDE SQUARE 

Buckthorpe Brothers 

Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 



Schram & Buhrman 
Jewelers 

BOTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



Wiegand Market 

224 E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy 

Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 
Quality and Service our Motto 



THE 
AYERS NATIONAL BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. F. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 




DIRECTORS 

ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-President H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

H. C. CLEMENT, Asst. CaBhier W. G. GOEBEL, Asst. Cashier 



Member of Federal Reserve Bank 



The Store for 

DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

HOSIERY, GLOVES, CORSETS 

NOTIONS 



RftDJOHNS&I>0D*fc 



The Dunlap 

(EUROPEAN) 

A HOTEL THAT APPEALS TO WOMEN 
John M. Rule, Manager 



CAFE CONFECTIONERY 

jpcacock |nn 

For Dainty Lunches, Sandwiches and Salads and also 
Fancy Sundaes etc., from Our Fountain 

CATERING SODA 

Electrical Suggestions for the Student 

ELECTRIC TABLE STOVES 
DISC STOVES 
TOASTERS 
CURLING IRONS 
HAIR DRYERS 
TRAVELER'S FANS 

JACKSONVILLE Ry. & LIGHT CO. 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

FARRELL STATE BANK 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 

Capital $200,000.00 

OFFICERS DIRECTORS 

E. E. Crabtree, President F. J. Blackburn 

F. E. Farrell, Vice-President E. E. Crabtree 
T. A. Chapin, Vice-President |' ^' pjJJJJjjj 
M. W. Osborne, Cashier j' s. Hackett 
Bess Hadden, Asst. Cashier M. W. Osborne 

The Miller Hat Shop 

Exclusive Millinery 

211 West State Street 

GILBERTS DRUGSTORE 

Drugs, Candies, Kodaks. 

REXALL REMEDIES 



A 



NNOUNCING 

The removal of our office and printing 
plant to our new building, 3 1 South 
Main street Sept. 1 . 

The Roach Press 



BRADY BROS 


MYERC 


EVERYTHING IN 


MBRcJFiEfe? 


Hardware 

House Furnishings, Paints 

Auto Tires and 

Supplies 


Exclusive Agents 

Hartman Vv ararobe Trunks 

Complete Line Hand Baggage 

Mannish 


45-47 South Side Square 


Sweater Coats 



C. S. Richards Miss Ezard 

1 he Book and Novelty Shop 

FOR STATIONERY AND FICTION, BIRTHDAY AND 

SEASONABLE CARDS AND GREETINGS 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES; ALSO DEVELOPING 
PRINTING AND ENLARGING 
59 EAST SIDE SQUARE JACKSONVILLE 

I still believe in and sell "QUALITY" foot- 
wear. 

Jas. McGinnis & Co. 

62 East Side Square 



JACKSONVILLE'S BEST HOTEL 

New/ Pacific Hotel 

(European) 

First-class Cafe in Connection 

Recommended by Woman's College 
Service is our motto 



Sptetl) Studio 

Photography In All Its 
Branches 

Specialize in High Grade 

Portraiture 

S. W. Cor. Square 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe, say: 

"Our selections of Shoes in all Styles are made with the idea 
that QUALITY NEVER DISAPPOINTS." 
No trouble to show goods. 

54 North Side Square 



_ 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

KNOWN FOR 

Ready-to-Wear 

and 
POPULAR PRICED 

Dry Goods 



The 

Artcrart Printing 

Office 



213 WEST MORGAN ST. 

Telephone 400 

EMIL HARWEY 



A. E. SCHOEDSACK 

CITY STEAM DYE WORKS 

Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and Pressing 

Illinois Phone 388 — Bell Phone 98 
Terms Cash 



J. Bart Johnson Company 

Everything Musical 



49 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



J. H. ZELL 


AT YOUR SERVICE 
FOR BETTER PICTURES BRING 




YOUR FILMS TO US 


GROCERY 


The Armstrong 


A good place to get good things 
to eat at a reasonable 


Drug Stores 


price 


QUALITY STORES 




S. W. Cor Sq. 235 E. State St. 


EAST STATE STREET 


Jacksonville, 111. 






Sha nkens 

Woman s 
Fashionable Apparel 

A brief visit to the 
store will give you a better 
idea as to what is new. 



W. S. EHNIE & BRO. 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Ice Cream 
and Ices 



322-324 East State Street 



$?e !&ooke Sfyoppe 



SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



"3Fine Stationery 
(Blft Sbop Stovctties 



J. P. BROWN 

Music House 

SHEET MUSIC AND STUDIES 

Prompt Attention 
Given Mail Orders 
VICTROLAS 
and RECORDS 



TEACHERS' SUPPLIES 
A SPECIALTY 



19 South Side Square 
Jacksonville 



HARRY HOFMANN 
FLORAL CO. 



CORSAGES, CUT FLOWERS 
AND PLANTS 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouse — S. Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone Phone 154; 111. 182 

Greenhouse: Bell Phone 775 



. J. SMITH 

MILLINERY 

NEEDLECRAFT 
CORSETS 

HAND-MADE BLOUSES 

LADIES' HOSIERY 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 



\\T^ *-. 4- MEMBER OF FLORISTS 

VV alii TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

ASK US ABOUT IT 

Cut Flowers 

SAY IT WITH 
FLOWER FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

People's Furniture Company 

209—211 SOUTH SANDY STREET 

See us if you wish to ship your goods. 
We crate anything. 

STANLEY W. WRIGHT, Mgr. 

ANDREW LECK 

DEALER IN 

Meats, Groceries and Vegetables 

Telephone 59 229 E. State St. 




%J Always 



FINEST TOILET ARTICLES 

S2i9X^n sid S e T FOR BRUSHES AND 

DRUG CO. I FANCY NOVELTIES 

"Try The Drug Store First" 



ANNEX FOR LADIES 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT- 221-223 EAST STATE STREET 




Footwear 
For Young People 

FOREMOST DISTRIBUTORS 

OF FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

We Repair jrjr g-^ -53 y) jnr\ T> ^ We sbine 
Shoes 11 vJ* JT J: JjJ -tC CT Sfcoes 

On the Cornet 

For Those \Vno Discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to please 
the students who come to our city. We select only the best ma- 
terials and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 
PURE CANDIES, HOT & COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES 
All Packages Delivered 'PHONE 227 228 W. State St. 

JOHN TV. MERRIGAN 

—HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies' Hosiery, Gloves, Sweaters, Scarfs, Rain- 
Coats, Handkerchiefs, Caps, and Duofold 
Underwear. 

TOM DUFF1VER 

// it's New— We Have It 10 WEST SIDE SQ. 

EASLEY STORE 

NEW AND SECOND HAND 

217 W. Morgan St. Telephone 1371 

For Fancy Fruits and Confectionery 

P. Bonansinga 

72 E. Side Square Telephone 130 



Woman's College girls can always find a complete 
line of Black Cat Hosiery and Sweaters at 

T. M. Tomlinson's Clothing Store 

North Side Square 

C. C. Phelps Dry Goods Company 

EVERYTHING IX 

DRY GOODS AND READY-TO-WEAR 



Walsh Electric 
Company 

NORTH MAIN STREET 



Dr. W. O. WAIT 

Osteopathic Physician 

18 Year a Resident Osteopath 
TREATS SUCCESSFULLY 

ALL CURABLE DISEASES 

Office and Residence 

120 Westminster Street 

Jacksonville, Illinois 



TWIN LOAF OLD ENGLISH 

Made Clean Sold Clean 

EAT 
MORE 
BREAD 




IDEAL 



OUR 
BEST 
FOOD 



Stop and Shop 

VASCONCELLOS 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 

SELF SERVICE CASH AND CARRY GROCERY 

Let us supply the eats for your next feed 



^ I) e College <& r e e t i n 3 5 



The College Greetings is published monthly by the students of 
Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students of all 
departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the fifteenth of each 
month. 

Subscriptions, $1.25 a year, payable in advance. Single copies 
25 cents. 

Entered at Jacksonville Post Office as second-class matter. 



Contents 



At a College Window 


194 


Baccalaureate Service 


195 


Commencement Day 


196 


Dramatic Club Play 1923 


1 98 


Seventieth Anniversary of Phi Nu 


200 


Class Day 


200 


Alumnae 


201 


May Day 1923 


201 


The Class of 1923 — Their Future (Maybe) 


201 


Officers of Student Organizations 


207 


The Greetings for Next Year 


208 


Orchestra Concert 


209 


Endowment 


21 1 


The Practice House 


21 1 


The English "E' 


21 3 


Observations of Ophelia 


214 


Honors for 1 922-1 923 


215 


Athletic Association 


215 


Greetings Financial Report 


216 



Dhe College (Breetirtgs 



AT A COLLEGE WINDOW 
From the College Anthology 1921-22 

Grandma married at seventeen, 
And when she was as old as I 
She had two children, and her house 
Was famed as sweet and orderly. 

And here am I, at twenty-one, 

At a dormitory window leaning, 

With a theme to write 

Sometime tonight 

On "Culture — Its Ancient and Modern Meaning", — 

When I'd give all culture the world has known 

For a little baby all my own. 



e I'm s°i n g f° r - 



It's not man's love 
I know I'd soon tire of the' sight 
Of the same one every day, and then 
I want my virgin bed at night, 
But there's a sort of hungry ache 
Here in my arm and at my breast, 
And something tries to say that there 
A little head should rest. 

It's big round eyes would shine so bright 
As I rocked it in some twilit place, 
And it would raise a tiny hand — perhaps, 
And touch my face .... 

But here I sit a-dreaming 

When I should be writing themes. 



— Margaret Fowler '23. 
-194— 



Orjc (Lollegd (BreeUngs 



BACCALAUREATE SERVICE 

The first commencement event for the class of 1923 was 
the Baccalaureate service at Grace Church, Sunday morning June 
third. The sermon was by Dr. William Wedderspoon of St. 
James Methodist Episcopal church of Chicago. He spoke on the 
subject of Open Windows and Doors, or the Law of Imports 
and Exports. His texts were from Revelation 3: 8, and Dan- 
iel 6:10. He spoke of our keeping our windows and doors op- 
en, of learning things and thinking, — importing, so that we 
can help by exporting and serving. The sermon was one es- 
pecially applicable to a Baccalaureate Service as well as one that 
would make its audience think at any time. 

Dr. Wedderspoon also paid high tribute to Dr. Harker for 
his years of wonderful service in helping to "open windows to- 
wards Jerusalem". 

At the close of the sermon, Dr. Harker briefly addressed the 
Seniors. He spoke of the privileges they had received in being 
able to attend such a college as this. They are thus privileged not 
for their own personal gain, but that they might better serve. He 
said in part: 

''You have been educated in a Christian college, a college 
whose chief business is to inspire its students with the resolute 
purpose to use all their educated abilities and advantages after 
Christ's ideal of life. 

"The greatest yearning of my heart for all my students in 
these thirty years has been that after they have heard me speak, 
they would see my Master Christ beyond me and my teaching, 
and they would follow Him. 

"He thought not of Himself, came not to be ministered un- 
to; He saved others, Himself He would not save. 

" Tor their sakes.' He says, Tor their sakes I sanctify my- 
self — I make myself ready, and I offer myself up, a living and a 
devoted sacrifice. All that I have, and all that I am, I dedicate 
to those who need.' 

—195— 



ofye College (Breetings 



"This is the answer for you. Only as you dedicate your 
educated abilities to the program of Jesus Christ can you justify 
your college education and your special selection and equipment. 

4: s)e $ sK >jc 

"The coming years will be more giorious still. More and 
more out from the college will flow an increas- 
ing stream of educated, consecrated womanhood, carrying where- 
ever they go the spirit and the program of Jesus, and establishing 
everywhere His Kingdom of 'Peace on earth, good will among 
men.' 

"To this end you have been selected and made ready. To 
this end we set the seal of the College upon you, and send you 
out as her representatives, confident that wherever you go, you 
will honor her in faithful and devoted service after the mind of 

Christ." 

i rrmTTt > 

COMMENCEMENT DAY 

The class of 1923 took the final step in the completion of 
its college course at its Commencement on Tuesday, June fifth. 
It was as always an impressive occasion. The audience joined 
in the repeating of several of the Scripture passages so familiar 
to all students of Illinois Woman's College; and Mrs. Forrest 
sang "My Garden" and "The Year's at the Spring". 

The address of the day was given by Mr. Glenn Frank, 
•Editor of the Century Magazine. Mr. Frank's subject was 
"Can Western Civilization Salvage Itself". He spoke of the real 
causes of the last war as the supremacy of the new paganism — 
the desire for power and pleasure at any cost, over the old Christ- 
ian ideals. Germany began the war, not as the whim of a mad 
Kaiser, but because she had attained a higher degree of pag- 
anism than any other country. But while Germany pulled down 
the post that was supporting our temple of civilization the 
whole structure was rotten. The rest of the world deplored 
pagan ideals and practiced them. But after the war began other 

—196— 



"C3t)<2. College (Brcetm^s 



countries entered it as if they were on a crusade to win back 
Christianity, and the world assured itself that it was having a 
new spiritual awakening. But when the war ended, it found 
itself not on a spiritual elevation but on a moral decline from 
which it has not yet arisen. 

Mr. Frank spoke of the writers we have had recently those 
confirmed optimists who see darkness only as a necessary pre- 
requisite to light, and those who see in our present level the 
death of our civilization, because of ( i ) a biological fear that the 
best stock of the white race seems to be wearing out; (2) a pych- 
ological fear, because we are so governed by crowds; ( 3 ) an eco- 
nomic fear that our industrial system is self destructive; (4) an 
administrative fear that we shall lose sight of our purposes; (5) 
a moral fear of everything from flappers to heretic theology. 

Mr. Frank expressed the opinion that we have with us the 
necessary requisites for our racial salvation, namely "The Sal- 
vaging of our Civilization", but that wehave them in a raw state. 
What is needed is a great leader who can choose and mold and 
build a great structure of civilization. Such a leader must be a 
combination of Francis Bacon and Billy Sunday, a man of great 
intellectual attainments with the ability of interpreting to the 
common mind. Of course such a man cannot be easily found, 
but Mr. Frank believes one will come from somewhere. We 
have had one — Theodore Roosevelt, we may have another, and 
under his leadership, civilization will right itself. 

Mr. Frank is a forceful and convincing speaker, and well 
fulfills Dr. Harker's introduction of him as one who can see, and 
feel, and express his feeling. 

Following his speech, the certificates and degrees were con- 
ferred. The scholarship honors were announced as won by 
Margaret Fowler, Elson Pires, and Florence Weber. 



Dunne 



M. H. in Vergil; — The face of his father fell from the sky 
and poured forth words." 



—197— 



Oi)e (TolUge Greetings 



DRAMATIC CLUB PLAY 1923 

Every woman wants to be charming, some succeed and 
some do not. Some fail because they lack the proper opportu- 
nities for developing this much desired quality, and some people 
believe that our schools fail in not making the cultivation of 
charm a required course. 

To develope the charm in girls. Austin Bevans, who upon 
the death of his aunt is left a school for girls, that had always 
been famous for preparing girls for rigid college entrance ex- 
aminations, turns the school into "The Charm School" and 
there is the play presented by the Dramatic Club on June 2. 
The first scene takes place in the room where the young heir 
and his four friends try to do light housekeeping on the salary 
of one and the allowance of two others. Both sources of in- 
come are cut off just as the play begins. The opportunity to 
run the school is immediately seized and the rest of the play 
takes place in the school where the young men have positions as 
professors of dancing, ukele playing, accounting and history 
course. The last two do not have the same popularity that 
the first two enjoy. The students prove themselves so charming 
that the young professors have trouble preserving their dignity; 
and the head of the school, Mr. Bevans finally has to give up 
his position, because he violated the rules laid down by Mr. 
Johns, who held a heavy mortgage on the place, that he would 
not allow any of the students to fall in love with him. 

The play was most ably presented under the direction of 
Miss Ida B. Davis. All the Woman's College girls fell in love 
with the professors and had trouble in believing they were of 
their own number. Our heartiest thanks and congratluations 
for the splendid evening given us! 

The cast was: 
Austin Bevans the handsome hero who inherits the school 

— Katherine Yanseck 
His friends — David McKensie, a law student, who takes up the 

teaching of history Martha Logan 

—198— 



^>l)e (Eollcge (Breedings 



Tim and Jim Simpkins, twins who had an allowance, who teach 
dancing and ukelele playing with a little falling in love on 
the side. 

Edythe Hall, Ruth Leech. 
George Boyd, an expert accountant and equally proficient at 
teaching the young ladies to keep their accounts straight. 

Irma Sturtevant 
Homer Johns, the lawyer, who holds the mortgage on the place. 

Josephine Rink 
Elise Benedotti, the heroine, who indeed has charm. 

Ethel Morris. 

Miss Curtis, the bookkeeper who much appreciates masculine 

assistance Irene Mallison 

Miss Hay, "A connection by marriage of Homer Johns", second 

in command at the Charm School, although not entirely in 



sympathy with the new ideas 

Some of the young ladies of the institution: 
Sallie Boyd, George's sister 
Muriel Doughty 
Ethel Spelvin 
Alix Mercier 
Lillian Stafford 
Madge Kent 



Alice Barwise 

Donnabel Keys. 

Lola Lesar 

Virginia Clark 

Beatrice Hasenstab 

Marie Barton 

Nettie Steadry 



D H C 



Miss Johnston and Ruth Webb discussing the desira- 
bility of outdoor festivities: 

Miss J. — Well look at the luck the Athletic Association 
had on May Day and Track Meet. 

R. W. — Surely they haven't kept in very close communion 
with nature, have they? 

Miss J. — I don't know about their close communion, but 
they certainly believe in Baptism. 



—199— 



T3he College (Breetings 



SEVENTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF PHI NU 

Commencement week was properly started off Saturday 
evening, June the second, with the celebration of the Seventieth 
Anniversary of Phi Nu society. Almost one hundred sisters 
gathered from various parts of the globe to offer their sincerest 
congratulations and lend their assistance to a general good time. 

Phi Nu and Belles Lettres halls were charmingly arranged 
for the occasion and a delicious banquet was served there at six 
o'clock. Mrs. Lillian Davis Codding presided as toastmistress 
and a short program of songs and toasts followed. Among 
the speakers were Dr. Harker, who himself has four daughters in 
Phi Nu; Mrs. Belle Short Lambert, who has just returned from 
Europe, especially for the occasion; Miss Mary Wadsworth, who 
spoke of her work in France, and Mrs. Phyllis Wilkinson Pres- 
ton who good naturedly reminded us that a nice proportion of 
us would some day be keeping house, too. But the impressive 
event of the evening came when we all stood for a moment to 
do honor to one of the charter members of Phi Nu, Mrs. Elvira 
Hamilton Adams, who though an octogenerian, had journeyed 
from Portland, Oregon to be with us. 

Though some of us may be desirous of concealing our 
ages when we get along in years, Phi Nu is indeed proud to ac- 
knowledge her birthdays and from the spirit shown throughout 
the Anniversary, we know she will live to celebrate many, many, 
more. 

I >TTTTTT< > 

Class Day, 1923 was a little different than the class days 
of recent years have been. The program was given in Music 
Hall on Monday afternoon. A survey of our past from baby- 
hood until today was given by Margaret Fowler, and illustraed 
by various members of the class passing in pageant at the back 
of the stage. Ruth Webb as representative of '23 willed its 
most cherished possessions. Helen Massey sang, and then we 
saw our future in tableau form, interpreted by Elson Pires. 

—200— 



Obc (Tollcge (Brtetlngs 



Suzanne Rinehart played several violin solos, and the prog- 
ram concluded with a one act play, "Joint Owners in Spain." 
The scene of the play was in an Old Ladies' Home, and the 
characters were three inmates of the Home, played by Josephine 
Rink, Eva Gertrude Hodgens, and Alma Blodget, and the di- 
rector of the institution played by Florence Weber- 

The Alumnae and former students enjoyed a tea in the 
Social Room Tuesday afternoon. A varied program of stunts 
and music was given by the classes of 1 864, '94, '99, 1905, ' 1 2, 
13, '20. At six o'clock in the college dining room, the alumnae 
banquet was held. The tables were decorated with blue and 
yellow candles, and the candle lighting service was observed. 
Between courses of the banquet, songs written by alumnae were 
sung under the leadership cf Miss Esther Davis. 

Vera Wardner presided at the program which followed. 
Miss Neville presented the Class of 1923 for membership in the 
Alumnae Association; Miss Powell extended a welcome from 
the Association, and Eloise Calhoun, the class president, re- 
sponded for her class. There were short reports from various 
city associations and Mrs. Belle Short Lambert spoke most in- 
terestingly of her recent trip to Europe. The program con- 
cluded with the singing of the college song. 



Dunne 



MAY DAY 1923 

All nature seemed for days to be against the May Fete, but 
at length it lent itself perfectly to the setting and the program 
was held Saturday May 19. A large number of people were 
gathered on the bleachers and proved to be a very interested and 
enthusiastic audience. 

The Festival was a presentation of the Old Greek Legend 
of the coming of Spring with Persephone's return to earth after 
having been spirited away to the Kingdom of Death and Shad- 

—201— 



I3t)£ (TolUge (Breetin^s 



ows. It opened beautifully with the coming of dawn and the 
showing of the fields of green and yellow crops. Demeter and 
Persephone enter upon the Sea Shore where the Sea Waves are 
doing a graceful dance. 

The Sea Nymphs are seen playing and dancing nearby and 
Persephone is left in their care by Demeter- Beautifully tempting 
flowers however lure her farther and farther from the Sea Ny- 
mphs and she is finally carried off from the earth. Demeter soon 
returns and finds that Persephone is missing. She inquires for 
her from the frisking Tree Dryads, from the beautiful Fountain 
Nymphs and then from Pan and his fairies. At length she 
comes before Helios, the Sun God who tells her of her daughter's 
fate and sends his Sunbeams for Hermes, the messenger of the 
gods who is requested to go in search of Persephone. 

As Hermes returns with her everything awakens to new life. 
The hissing of the Furies is forgotten in the flourishing of the 
crops and flowers; and the Seven Graces meet Persephone while 
the Peasants dance with joy. 

In color the entire pageant was charming and effective. It 
came to a beautiful culmination in the Crowning of the Queen, 
Miss Eloise Calhoun. The entire court party was in white and 
formed a very impressive procession. The Queen was beautiful 
in every detail and carried herself with true and becoming dig- 
nity. 

The Pageant was of unusual interest because it was plan- 
ned by Miss Margaret Hamilton '22 who is now an Assistant 
Director of Physical Education at I. W. C. 



Dnnnc 



"How did you come out with your exams?" 
"Oh, I knocked 'em cold." 
"Howzat?" 
"Got zero." 

— Upper Iowa Collegian. 

—202— 



Obc College (Breetln^s 



THE CLASS OF 1923— THEIR FUTURE— (Maybe) 

I have been asked to write the prophecy for my class. 
Mercy, I had the same feeling that I have when there is an ad- 
vanced students' recital and I know my number comes next. I 
am not of a literary turn of mind and to have such a responsi- 
bility suddenly thrust upon me!! 

So I went to a very wise man whose whole occupation was 
to study the stars — gaze into a crystal ball and fore-tell events. 
I can't pronounce his name, much less spell it, so I'll just omit 
that. If ever you want to see him yourself I'll be glad to give 
you his street number. 

When I entered, the old man look up from the huge book 
he was perusing — brushed a cob-web from the arm of a nearby 
chair and asked me to be seated. Timidly I explained in what 
way I needed his assistance — he shook his head and scowled. 

"Mademoiselle, to predict the weather is simple beside try- 
ing to fortell what a woman will do. A class of girls' from the 
Woman's College is too much for any mere man. A class of the 
year 1923 with twenty-three members, — I'd rather predict the 
number of gas masks to be used in the next world war." 

That wasn't very encouraging, but at last I prevailed upon 
him to at least try (I was desperate by that time). So he ad- 
justed his crystal ball so it would register twenty years hence 
and I began to name my various class-mates. 

Mary Hall had engaged herself to a minister during our 
Senior year and I was anxious to know how she liked being an 
example to the flock. The old man looked and at last got the 
focus necessary to read the future from tht distance of twenty 
years. Poor Mary! They are moving and Mary isn't enjoy- 
ing the packing. Some of the china that had been wedding 
presents had been hopelessly demolished. It's a hard life, Mary. 

Next I named Helena Betcher. He gazed soulfully into 
the crystal ball. 

—203— 



Obe (TolUge Greetings 



" 'Tis three o'clock in the morning and the maiden is writ- 
ing furiously with a cup of incense before her." 

"No, that's coffee," I remarked. "It sounds like a neglected 
term paper to me." 

The old man continued: 

"She is to deliver a paper at the International Congress of 
Women on 'Woman's Ability to Concentrate'. She is to de- 
liver it at noon. There is a substantial check in store for her 
which she will give to Endowment." 

"Um" thought I, "Billee hasn't changed her ways. She 
never wrote a term paper until the night before it was due." 

Next I asked about Flo Dikeman, our student President. 
The old man gazed again: 

"She is a busy woman — she is matron of a school for de- 
linquent girls, president of the Ladies' Aid Society, and plays 
the piano for church and Sunday school." 

I knew it would take more than that to ruffle Flo's calm 
spirits, so I inquired about her room-mate Ada Foster. My 
ancient friend was longer than usual, but at last my patience was 
rewarded: 

"I see her in a wonderful lateritious building to which all 
the beautiful women of the land are coming. She has suc- 
ceeded Lady Duff Gordon, and has a world-wide reputation." 

"Now tell me about Ruth Webb." 

He pushed back his skull cap and gazed and gazed. 

"She is a very forceful and eloquent speaker. In fact, she 
will be one of the foremost lecturers of the day." 

I sighed enviously, but doubted not, remembering Ruth's 
postprandial glories at I. W. C. on Founder's Day and like oc- 
casions. 

Margaret Fowler was next on my list. 

"She has made a reputation for her alma mater by her 
writing. I see on the bookstands all over the country a new 
book of hers which tells us how to dispense with war, unite the 

—204— 



I5b<2 (ToUcgc Greetings 



Democratic and Republican parties, run the railroads and assure 
ourselves of proper ventilation." 

Mercy! I always knew Margaret was bright, but I didn't 
think she would carry it that far. I was meditating on the 
sad fact that some people have more than their share of brains, 
when I noticed the old man was going to sleep. I coughed to 
wake him up and asked about Eleanor Jane. 

I was amazed to learn that she was training runners for 
the world races held annually on the Fiji Islands. She had 
worked out formulas and studied ways and means and the re- 
sult of her excogitations was a new method of running, where- 
by one foot is made to do the work of two. Now you can 
plainly see that if each foot can be trained to do what two feet 
have always done before, a record breaking sprinter will, no 
doubt, be developed. 

Eloise Calhoun was finally located in the tenement district 
of New York City perpetrating various reforms for the world's 
good. Eloise may make a good reformer, but. Oh My!! She 
is assisted by Maude Craigmiles, who, whenever any of Eloisc's 
charges refused to be reformed, by the force of her logical and 
philosophical argumentation convinces the recalcitrant that it is 
for his soul's good. Luck to them. 

Next I inquired about Mrs. Wackerle- That seemed to be 
some confusion in the crystal ball. It got all cloudy and the 
star-gazer pulled his beard in perplexity. At last it began to 
clear — 

"Ah," dead silence! "Mrs. Wackerle has devoted her life 
to the laudable task of proving that there is no conflict between 
science and religion." I leave that subject to William Jennings 
Bryan and Mistress Wackerle. 

Eva Gertrude Hodgens and Dorothy Mae Smith have open- 
ed an establishement in St. Louis. It is model cafeteria and is 
conducted according to all the rules they learned at I. W. C. 

Friend Gertie has at last returned to her beloved Washing- 
ton, D. C. and has become a famous tourist's guide. She now 
conducts her old I. W. C- friends to Washington's Monument 

—205— 



Ol>e College (Breelings 



conducts her old I. W. C. friends to Washington's Manument 
and the White House with all her old aplomb. 

Paulina Tull had vampish tendencies when in I. W. C, 
but she began to take the world seriously. She is now with 
Mary Alice Harper in Central China conducting a mission 
school. This school is under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A. 
in Los Angels, California, which is in charge of Florence 
Weber. 

Harriet Hall and May Larimore have succeeded Miss Lob- 
dell and Miss Johnston on the I. W. C. faculty and are nobly 
endeavoring to live up to their principles and reputation. 

Jo Rink went on the stage and for fifteen years had a won- 
derful success, but she has disappeared. Let us hope it is only 
temporary — she may be creating a new part or originating one 
of her famous pet expressions. 

My predicting companion was very much interested in 
Alma Blodget. She deserted Latin for journalism and is now 
the editor of the largest newspaper in the world edited by a 
woman. The financial part she leaves to Elson Pires and I'm 
sure you'll agree that it is in competent hands. 

Helen Massie is one of the music critics who make or 
crush "absolutely" aspiring Metropolitan stars. 

By this time I was curious as to what would befall me in 
the future, but I found my friend absorbed with his own 
thoughts. At last the man's state of statuvolence seemed to be 
sound slumber, rather than that conduced by any extended 
for-knowledge of events. Becoming impatient last, I went 
to the old man's chair and looked in the crystal ball for myself. 
It began to cloud and then to clear. It seemed that I was look- 
ing into a deep well, at the bottom of which pictures were form- 
ing. Interesting, to say the least. Fiddle and bow, an old shoe 
and a fountain pen. What were they? I'll tell you in twen- 
ty years. — S. R. 



—206— 



Ol)£ (Tollege (Brewings 



OFFICERS OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



1923-24. 

Student's Association : 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 
Y. W. C. A. 

President 

Vice-President 
Illiwoco : 

Editor 

Business Manager 
Greetings: 

Editor 

Business Manager 
Athletic Association 

President 

Vice-President 
May Day Chairman 
Belles Lettres President 
Lambda Alpha Mu President 
Phi Nu President 
Theta Sigma President 



Carrie Dyarman 

Luro Anderson 

Beatrice Hasenstab 

Ruth Bishop 

Mary Elizabeth Roark 
Winifred Potter 

Irene Fruit 
Hazel Moore 

Audrey King 
Mildred Waldron 

Helen Bly 

Catherine Randle 

Avis Murphy 

Esther Purl 

Harriet McComber 

Fredericka Balch 

Wilhemine Wagner 



D n C 



Dr. Harker says that there is so much knowledge in col- 
lege because the freshmen come with so much knowledge and 
the Seniors leave with so little. According to Miss Johnston, 
I. W. C. has ben enriched more than usual by the Class of 1923. 

A certain freshman: "Let's go to Batsey's in the morn- 
ing for breakfast." (Roars of laughter)" Oh, I mean 
Patsey's!" 

—207— 



I5I)£ (College ©reelings 



Vol. XXVI 



Jacksonville, III., June, 1923 



No. 9 



STAFF OF THE COLLEGE GREETINGS 



Editor-in-chief 
Associate Editor 
Business Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 
Junior Editor 
Sophomore Editor 
Sophomore Business Manager 
Art Editor 
Faculty Adviser 



Margaret Fowler 

Alma Blodget 

Elson Pires 

Avis Murphy 

Dorothy Dean 

Dorothy Dieman 

Mae Virgin 

Ethyl Keller 

Miss Neville 



Editor 

Associate Editors 

Business Manager 



SENIOR CLASS 

Alma Blodget 
Suzanne Rinehart, Maude Craigmiles 

Elson Pires 



THE GREETINGS FOR NEXT YEAR. 

Any peaceful reform takes a lots of talk before it is ac- 
complished. For years there has been agitation for a college 
news sheet to supplant the Greetings. News published in the 
Greetings is "cold" by the time it appears. That is why less 
and less news has been published. A news sheet, it is argued, 
will not only relieve the Greetings of any responsibility for 
recording the mad round of college activities, but will be a 
better medium for arguments on such subjects as grades and 
societies, and will be able to present in a snappier manner per- 
sonal items and jokes. The Greetings can then strive to be as 
literary as possible. This venture will be watched with keenest 
interest by those who have discussed it in the past. 



—208— 



^Ije College (Breellngs 



At the annual Greetings breakfast this spring, the old and 
new staffs decided to put before the student body such a plan 
for the Greetings next year. The students enthusiastically 
adopted the suggestion. Therefore, next year we shall have a 
bi-weekly news sheet, and a bi-monthly literary magazine. Both 
will be under the direction of the same staff, consisting of: 

Editor-in-chief — Audrey King, '24. 

Associate Editor — Margaret Dryden, '24. 

Assistant Editors — Lena Bennet, '25, Mary McMillan, '26 

Business Manager — Mildren Waldron, '23. 

Assistnat Business Managers — Carol Roark, '25, Kathleen 
Calhoun, '26. 

Art Editor — Irene Spurgeon, '26. 



D H C 



ORCHESTRA CONCERT. 

The commencement season would not be entirely complete 
without the annual orchestra concert. The orchestra, under the 
direction of Mr. Pearson, was assisted by Madame Colard, who 
sang "The Swan", "The Nightengale", and by request, as an 
encore, "The Year's at the Spring". The numbers by the or- 
chestra were unusually good. The whole event, so long looked 
forward to came up to all expectations and was one of the most 
enjoyable events of the last week. 



H C 



"Why do you call a fast automobile rider a scorcher?" 
"Because he goes out at a hot pace, makes pedestrians boil- 
ing mad, warms-up the police, gets roasted in court, and calls it 
a burning shame." — Southern California Trojan. 



—209- 







Preshniftfti 



Ohe College Greetings 



Anybody sad? Nol 

Anybody glad? Yes! 

All right, let's yell! 
Did someone say girls have no pep? For the sake of his 
poor misinformed mind, we wish he had been here for the four 
days we were raising Endowment. No one who saw Billy Hall 
leading yells and the rest twisting through the streets of J'ville 
in a snake dance would have any doubt as to girls' enthusiasm 
and ability to put things over. Four days is really not a very 
long time but it wasn't for every one of the I. W- C. girls, and 
the faculty too, to get in their pledges so that the $5000 still 
needed to reach the $20,000 might be raised, 100% ! No won- 
der we painted the town red on Saturday morning when we 
found we had raised more than $250 over our $20,000. Dr. 
Terry seemed to enjoy it too even it did cost him treats for the 
Executive Committee. Charley horse, stiff legs, and all aches and 
pains were forgotten as the parade formed back of the truck 
packed with girls apparently gone mad and yelling like maniacs. 
It was a glorious culmination of a year's efforts in shampooing, 
shoe-blacking, pressing, bed-making etc. Even if we were a 
little tired when it was all over, no one regretted the part she had 
taken or the time she had spent. There will not be an I. W. C. 
girl who will not scan the papers on July 4, no matter if she is 
in New York or California, to see how the big campaign ends. 
We know the $250,000 will be raised and we can shoot a whole 
package, or two or three, of giant fire crackers in celebration. 

t >tttttt< > 

THE PRACTICE HOUSE 
The practice house — What a thrill it gave us when we dis- 
covered that we were really going to have one this year. In- 
stead of merely studying from text books about the problems 
of household management we were going to have the opportu- 
nity of studying them first hand, and of helping to solve some 
of them ourselves. 

First came the question — Where shall it be? With the 
—211— 



Ol)e (TolUgt (Br^Uncjs 



endowment drive on it was impossible to equip a house of our 
own. Miss Eleanor Thompson came to the rescue and put her 
home and her household at our mercy for a month. We want 
here to express to her our appreciation for her hearty interest and 
cooperation with the Home Economics Department and with 
the college in thus making it possible for us to chain down our 
theories to actual facts by putting into practice the things which 
we have learned in previous courses in Home Economics. The 
work was carried on under the supervision of Miss Grace Tickle, 
the Head of the Home Economics Department. Credit is also 
due to Miss Helen Merriman, Director of Household Arts, who 
helped to plan the course. We wish also to thank Dr. Harker and 
Mr. Metcalf for their share in making possible the financing of 
the undertaking. 

In the practice house, the Seniors in the Smith-Hughes course 
in Home Economics are given practical experience in the care and 
management of a home. They live in the house thirty consecu- 
tive days, there being five or six girls in residence at a time. There 
are as many positions to be held as there are girls in the house, 
each one of which held for a period of five or six days. The 
positions are those of Hostess, Housekeeper, Assistant House- 
keeper, Cook, Assistant Cook and Waitress. Serving in these 
various capacities the girls become familiar with all the house- 
hold duties and operations. 

They handle the finances of the house in a strictly business- 
like manner. They plan the menus, do the marketing, pre- 
pare and serve the meals, and buy household supplies. 

The girls are responsible for the general appearance and at- 
mosphere of the home and its upkeep in general. They are grad- 
ed on such points as accuracy, promptness, executive ability, co- 
operation and initiative. 

We are convinced that the course in Practical Household 
Management is proving to be a valuable addition to the equip- 
ment of instruction in the Department of Home Economics and 
are hoping that in a few years we have a house of our own. 

_212— — E. G. H. 



^>l)c College (Breetlngs 



THE ENGLISH "E". 

For several years it has been the custom to give awards to 
the freshman and upperclass students who submit the best three 
essays — broadly interpreted to include essays proper, poems, or 
stories, written for some class or school work. This year, the 
kind of award was changed. As in former years, the Fresh- 
man submitting the best manuscripts receive the gold circle. The 
upper-class winner received a blue "E" instead of a circle. This 
is the award presented to Audrey King, of the Class of '24. The 
wearing of the "E" admits students to great honors and one 
worth striving for. We think it a great idea and heartily con- 
gratulate the first wearer. 

I >TTTTTT< > 

Senior mail window had its usual crowd. The member of 
the faculty who wished to telephone finally managed to edge 
her way through and the line fell back to give her some oppor- 
tunity to talk. The line grew longer; the girls in the office 
sorted mail rapidly, and finally put some letters in the window. 
There were minutes of agony. 

"Jo, here's one for you. Flo, here's a very long one from a 
school board. Maybe you'll have another chance to contract." 

Mugs came sauntering in to get her letter. "Hurrah, 
there's a check in it." She realizes her mistake at so loudly pro- 
claiming her affluence, when a half dozen voices start up; 
"Don't forget you owe me a quarter." "A half dollar to me." 

"Ah, what's your letter? Isn't it from a school board? 
Got a job?" 

"No such luck. This is another letter of regret." 

Eloise came along to gather up the acceptances to the Phi 
Nu banquet, the line departed, hoping for better luck in the 
second mail. 



—213- 



Orjc (Tollege Greetings 



OBSERVATIONS OF OPHELIA 

To observe is a great pleasure sometimes; it is a greater 
pleasure to be able to interpret rightly what one observes. Op- 
helia deserted us this month, so her roommate, much less expert 
at seeing things must practice observation. 

Have you heard about Ophelia herself? She mailed her reg- 
ular postal card home the other day, and in her mad rush — you 
know how you never can get hold of her — addressed it to Jack- 
sonville instead of to Springfield. Geniuses can get by with 
things like that; we wish the rest of us could. 

Seniors tables are the seats of various important business 
meetings. Weighty matters are discussed and settled there. The 
latest thing is that Flo was contracting, leaving her knowledge 
to the school, perhaps, in accordance with the rule for Seniors. 

Speaking about leaving makes us want to explain. If any 
unitiated under-classmen heard the Seniors wailing on the day 
of last chapel about "It" being too long or too short, and 
thought we meant either the chapel service or until commence- 
ment, we'd like to correct them. The trouble was only about 
the length of our gowns. 

Endowment did go finely, didn't it? We'll all recom- 
mend either Flo or Vic for a job as scrubwoman. We've already 
heard that several distinguished townspeople have tried to pro- 
cure them for this important position. And didn't Uadore Cab- 
bage Slaw? 

The Seniors can't decide whether graduating is like "He 
shall die! He shall die!" or a response to the rest of the world. 
"Come on in, the water's fine!" Some of them are finding it a 
cold, cold world, as evidenced by the way letters of "We regret 
to inform you the position has been filled" come rolling in. 

The Seniors had heard many times of the great amount of 
leisure there was in that last week when everyone else was taking 
exams; but somehow that week failed to live up to expecta- 
tions. We were all so busy that we didn't have time to realize 
we were going to leave. We might not have had sense enough to 

—214— 



Otje College Greetings 



get ready, if it hadn't been for the assistance of the rest of the 
school. 

Another evidence of the creative ability at Illinois Woman's 
College was the song sung by Miss Fredricka Balch at the recital 
given by Miss Balch and Miss Suzanne Rinehart. The music 
both for violin and piano were written by Miss Rinehart. 

< ) H i > 

HONORS FOR 1 922-1 923 
Wesley Mather's Prizes — 
Essay Contest 

First prize — Mrs. Helen Birch Filson '24. 
Second prize — Beatrice Hasenstab '25. 
Expression Contest 
First prize — Ethel Morris '25. 
Second prize — Frances Brown '26. 
English Department prizes 
Freshmen — First prize — Birdie Arbuthnot. 
Honorable Mention — Mary McMillan. 
Upperclassmen — First prize— Audrey King. 
Honorable Mention — Dorothy Dieman. 
Greetings Short Story Contest 
Mary MacMillan, first; Birdie Arbuthnot, second. 
Greetings Poetry Contest 
Dorothy Dieman, first; Audrey King, second. 

< 1 n ( > 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
Award for most points won this year — Maurine Gilpin. 
Tennis cup — Janette Meredith. 
Hockey cup — Sophomores. 
Basket ball Shield — Sophomores. 
Numerals — Helena Betcher '23, Eleanor Jane Dinsmore '23, 

Donnabel Keys '25, Winifred Potter '25. 
Arm Bands — Eloise Calhoun, Flo Dikeman, Florence Weber, 

Catherine Randle, Maurine Gilpin, Helen McPherson, 

Ruth Bradley. 

—215— 



Ol)e College (Breetlngs 



All Star College Basket Ball team (chosen by faculty Basket 
Ball Tournament officials) — Beatrice Hasenstab, Hazel 
Moore, Forwards; Maurine Gilpin, Donnabel Keys, Cen- 
ters; Winifred Potter, Helen McPherson, guards. 
Girls who passed Red Cross Life Saving Examination and 
received Certificates — Eleanor Jane Dinsmore, Helen Bly, Sari- 
ta Jones, Janette Meredith, Frances Brooks, Eleanor Dowd, 
Maurine Gilpin, Beatrice Hasenstab, Hazel Moore, Catherine 
Stephenson, Julia Williamson, Winifred Potter, Helen Hall, 
Donnabel Keys, Virginia Harper, Hazel Iungerich, Helen Mc- 
Pherson, Frances Rowles, Ella Thompson. 



r 


i ii t \ 




GREETINGS FINANCIAL REPORT 


DEPOSITS 




Balance 




$186.40 


Subscriptions 




219.32 


Advertisements 




590.85 


Extra copies sold 




I.QO 




$998.47 


expenses 




Magazine Fund 




$ I3.OO 


Eight issues and Extra 




57I.OI 


Subscription Blanks 




3.5O 


Envelopes 




6.00 


P. O. Deposit 




8.00 


Incidentals 




2.34 


Illiwoco 




20.00 


Breakfast 




IO.9O 


Prizes 




IO.OO 


June Issue 




80.OO 




$724.75 


Balance 




$273.72 



—216- 



THE 
AYERS NATIONAL BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



DIRECTORS 

OWEN P. THOMPSON 
E. F. GOLTRA 
JOHN W. LEACH 
GEORGE DEITRICK 



t^pi&jsLt?* rUWl 




TaSfifsa 




i 








I 




»|Kfe g 








IB * BlilllffllSI " 








^psF- 


^^^-.,,™H 


, 



DIRECTORS 

ANDREW RUSSEL 
H. M. CAPPS 
O. F. BUFFE 
M. F. DUNLAP 



OFFICERS 

M. F. DUNLAP, President 

ANDREW RUSSEL, Vice-President H. J. RODGERS, Vice-President 

O. F. BUFFE, Cashier 
E. M. DUNLAP, Asst. Cashier H. K. CHENOWETH, Asst. Cashier 

H. C. CLEMENT, Asst. Cashier W. G. GOEBEL, Asst. Cashier 



Member of Federal Reserve Bank 



The Store for 

DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

HOSIERY, GLOVES, CORSETS 

NOTIONS 



R'ABJOHNS&DEID'Q 



The Dunlap 

(EUROPEAN) 

A HOTEL THAT APPEALS TO WOMEN 
John M. Rule, Manager 



F. J. Waddell & Company 

Garments for Young Women 

— A constant stream of New Models, embracng all the 
popular fancies of Late Fashion, always featuring the 
youthful lines so becoming, displayed daily in our Ready- 
to-Wear Section. 

Dresses Coats Suits Skirts Furs 
Negligees Silk Underwear Blouses Lingerie 

F. J. Waddell & Company 



y OU will be pleased with our fine line of 
Jewelry and Silverwear 

Girts That Please . . . 

RUSSELL & THOMPSON 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



L. L. BURTON 






Flash Lights 




and 


The Home of Better 


Batteries 


Shoe Repairing 


PETERSON BROS, 




320 E. State St. 


223 WEST MORGAN STREET 





YOUR PHOTOGRAPH WILL MAKE ONE GIFT 

THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN— 

OUR PORTRAITS SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 

Mollenbrok & McCullough 
♦♦♦Colonial 3rtn... 

The only High Class Place in the City to hold Banquets, Recep- 
tions and Luncheons 

We make a specialty of Real Ice Cream and deliver in any quan- 
tity. We also serve dinners,when reservation is made in 
advance. 

1213 WEST STATE STREET 
Illinois Telephone 93 Bell Telephone 67 




t Andre & Andre 



Everything 
to completely furnish 
the home 

Wallace-Nutting Pictures 

Quality, Service, Satisfaction 

The Best Place to Trade, after all. 



If you want a thing of good report 

Go to the men who the "Greetings" support. 



Smith Federal is yi^fuy word 

TlnJpPW Quality 

AJW'IK'C J jf is our watch-word 



Cully Coffee Company 

The Home of Good Coffee 



PHONE 268 



222 WEST STATE ST. 



Everything in Dry Goods and 
Millinery 

FLORETH'S 

West Side Dry Goods Co. 



A 

Good Place 

To 

Trade 



A 

Good Place 
To 
Trade 



Widmayer's High Grade Meats, Etc. 

Quick, Prompt and Courteous Service 

217 West State Street 
W. F. Widmayer C. E. Scgner 



chemist of skill investigate, 
Answer this quiz of mine: 

1 think I know what Carbonate, 
But where did Iodine? 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 

Best of Everything 



The Very Best The Very Best 
Photo-plays Music 

The Very Best 
Ventilation 



Shoes of the Hour 

Edwin Smart 
Shoe Co. 



No. 1 1 WEST SIDE SQUARE 



ASK ANY COLLEGE GIRL 
WHERE 

Lane's* Book: Store 

IS LOCATED 
THEY ALL KNOW THE PLACE 

It's Well Worth Considering 



Fancy Box Stationery 
Address Books 

313 W. STATE ST. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 



Program Pencils 
Wanl Gold and Silver 
Eversharp Pencils 

\A/. B. Rogers 



Use Brazola Coffee 

Sold by 

Jenkinson-Bode Co. 

Coffee Roasters and 

Wholesale Grocers 



Jacksonville Courier Co. 

READ THE 
EVENING COURIER 

For Today's News 



FINE JOB WORK a Specialty 
Catalogues, Pamphlets, Letter- 
Heads, etc., at lowest prices. 



WOMAN'S FURS 

The styles you will enjoy the quality will give satisfaction 

FRANK BYRNS HA S T 



STORE 



Economy Grocery 



Quality — Courtesy — Service 

East State Street 



PURE FOODS 



Phone 49 



"The Home of Crispette" 

The Sanitary 

Pop-corn and 
Crispette Shop 

Fresh Buttered Pop-Corn 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

227 E. State Street 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Loop Cafeteria and 
Care 



POPULAR PRICES 



WEST MORGAN STREET 



COME TO— 



FLORETHS 

For Everything in Dry Goods, Millinery, Coats 

Cosgriff's Coffee and Waffle 
Shop 



FAMOUS 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 



WAFFLES 

WEST STATE STREET 



Jos. Burgert 

Dealer in 

Good Shoes 



No. 26 

North Side of Square 



DORWARTS 

Cask Market 
CHOICE MEATS 

OF ALL KINDS 

Both Phones 196 
No. 230 WEST STATE STREET 



THE SCIENTIFIC WAY OF RETAILING GROCERIES 
IS EXEMPLIFIED IN ALL 

PIGGLY WIGGLY STORE 

YOU'LL FIND ONE AT 

74 E. SIDE SQUARE 

Buckthorpe Brothers 

Rialto 

BEST PICTURES ALL THE TIME 
COME IN 



Schram & Buhrman 
Jewelers 

BOTH PHONES JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 



Wiegand Market 

2:2-4 E. State Street 

for Cooked Meats 

Princess Candy Company 

The Home of Fine Home-made Chocolates and 

Candy- 
Tasty Lunch Served at all Hours 
Quality and Service our Motto 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 

Erected 1909 



AN'S COLLEGE 



ILLINOIS WO 

College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music. 
School of Fine Arts. 
School of Expression. 
School of Home Economics. 
A Standard College. 

Regular college courses leading to Bachelor's De- 
gree. Pre-eminently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located in the Middle 
West, in a beautiful, dignified, old college town, noted 
for its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are looking 
for a good college. 
Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE, 

Jacksonville, Illinois. 




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